Before sugar, we were talking about cholesterol

I’ve been tied up the past month, finishing and closing my New York Times Magazine article on sugar and high fructose corn syrup, It came out in the newspaper today. But before the sugar article took over every spare minute of my life,  my wife, Sloane, a source of wisdom and humor (and patience) in the family, strongly suggested I get my blood lipids checked and post the results for those who were dismayed or discouraged by my choice not to do so on the Oz show. Sloane wasn’t the only one to suggest this was a good idea. Some of those commenting on my blogs were insistent, to put it mildly.

So it took me awhile to get to a Quest lab with a prescription. Then it took another week for the results to come back. That was three weeks ago. Now I finally have the time to post them. Keep in mind as you go through these that I do indeed eat three eggs with cheese, bacon and sausage for breakfast every morning, typically a couple of cheeseburgers (no bun) or a roast chicken for lunch, and more often than not, a ribeye or New York steak (grass fed) for dinner, usually in the neighborhood of a pound of meat. I cook with butter and, occasionally, olive oil (the sausages). My snacks run to cheese and almonds. So lots of fat and saturated fat and very little carbohydrates. A deadly diet, according to Dr. Oz. Without further ado, here are my numbers,

 

 

Speak Your Mind

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Comments

  1. Evan says:

    I pretty much knew that you were healthy from what you’ve been eating Gary! I too see how pointless these numbers are though. Why bother finding out what they are if I am eating healthy?

  2. Aglaee says:

    your results are not surprising at all and I sure hope Dr. Oz takes the time to take a look at it and I would be curious to see how it compares with his own results! =)

  3. Anonymous says:

    Great stuff Gary.

  4. Anonymous says:

    Well done, Gary. Thanks for sharing. It was great to see you at Caltech.

  5. Anonymous says:

    What a cruel joke it would be, if eating the diet we evolved to eat was “deadly.” But wait…if this is a deadly diet…shouldn’t we have become extinct about a million years ago? Great NYT article, btw — thanks for a job well done!

    • Steve Kelem says:

      The diet can still be deadly and the species survive, even thrive, if you have kids before you die.
      We, as a species, have evolved to survive most childhood diseases. Scientists have found ways to allow previously-fatal genotypes to survive and be passed on to the offspring. We will not evolve (genetically) to survive diseases that grownups will die from as long as we have kids to propogate our genes before we get sick.

    • Mike Parish says:

      “if eating the diet we evolved to eat was “deadly.” ” Yes, our ancestors evolved eating cheese, eggs, bacon, sausage, butter and olive oil…..not. These are all post agricultural products and had nothing to do with our ancestors. Even if you give the egg idea some thought you’ll realize that eggs prior to farming were available only in the spring for a very short period of time, less than one month at most and in were hard to (and dangerous climbing) and in most countries get were tiny.

    • JR Murphy says:

      The answer is of course not.

    • JR Murphy says:

      The answer to Anonymous’ (April 18, 2011 at 6:36 am) question is “of course not”.

  6. Anonymous says:

    What a cruel joke it would be, if eating the diet we evolved to eat was “deadly.” But wait…if this is a deadly diet…shouldn’t we have become extinct about a million years ago? Great NYT article, btw — thanks for a job well done!

  7. The low CO2 is interesting, I believe this is due to respiratory compensation for ketones in the bloodstream in order to maintain blood pH. Effectively we low carb folk breathe more to reduce CO2 in our bloodstream to reduce the acidity of the bicarbonate ion, in order to offset acidic ketones. Anyone else seen this on blood test results ?

    • Burning fat also produces less CO2 than burning carbohydrate because fats are poor in oxygen compared to carbs.

      • don’t follow your argument – the CO2 would depend on the carbon content of fats vs carbs, the oxygen will come from the lungs to supplement the (small) amount of oxygen in carbs. Sucrose C12H22O11 for example appears to have a lot of O in it but only enough to make 11 H2O molecules, needing 12 O2 from the lungs to make 12 CO2.

        Oleic acid (major component in olive oil) is CH3(CH2)18COOH which needs 19.5 O2 from air to burn the C plus another 18 for the H (approx).

        You might end up in the right place with your lower CO2 from food hypothesis because the H in the fats provides a lot of energy that sucrose doesn’t have, but you got there by the wrong route. The C:H ratio is key.

        In the end the blood gases are regulated by respiration not nutrition.

        • Alan Schaffer says:

          It’s not quite as simple as how much carbon is in a molecule. I don’t know all the physiology, but the respiratory quotient of fat is lower than that of carbs. In other words, more CO2 is produced in the oxidation of carbs than fat. When I treat ICU patients with advanced lung disease, I find they do better on low carb, high fat diets. The more CO2 we produce, the more we have to breathe to eliminate the CO2. But that isn’t the issue. The primary process here is a metabolic acidosis created by the generation of ketones. The acidosis lowers the pH. We respond by “blowing off” more CO2 to bring the pH closer to normal.

    • marial says:

      Yes! My CO2 level was also measured as out of range, think it was 19 or 20. It was the only out-of-range result on my labs. I had been eating low-carb/primal for about a year at that point.

    • marial says:

      Yes! My CO2 level was also measured as out of range, think it was 19 or 20. It was the only out-of-range result on my labs. I had been eating low-carb/primal for about a year at that point.

    • Dan Hagg says:

      Looking at Gary’s labs the anion gap is 16 which is elevated. among the most common of the common list of causes of anion gap acidosis would be ketones, the bicarb falls to maintain electroneutrality in the blood as the ketones are effectively unmeasured anions whose paired hydrogen ions have been buffered. the bicarbonate in this case is regulated by the kidneys more so than the lungs. these lab values don’t tell us what his dissolved carbon dioxide is. i suspect that this is a typical fasting morning result and a late day sample would be different.

      • Alan Schaffer says:

        You are right about the high anion gap metabolic acidosis. But fasting overnight won’t produce a high AG acidosis. As Gary is on a ketogenic diet, I am sure he has this mild high AG acidosis any time of day, and is experiencing the benefit of his ketonemia.

  8. Doug McGuff (Body by Science) recently put up a post (http://www.bodybyscience.net/home.html/?p=988) entitled Not Everything Needs to be Measured. He argued that he doesn’t even know what his data are.

    “It is difficult for most people to accept that I do not even check my cholesterol numbers. If my numbers were less than ideal, I would respond by doing what I am doing already.”

    Subject to a disclaimer re those already ill, he also says:

    “Many, many times the human urge to measure and document can cause much more harm than good. My advice is to eat a hunter-gatherer diet, perform a BBS type workout, remain active and productive and resist the urge to have some sort of documentation of how you are doing.”

    Sounds good to me.

    • Dana Seilhan says:

      On the other hand, those of us willing to document this stuff will be the ones proving to the doubters that our way of eating does a lot of good. Without our evidence, they will keep believing the vegan party line that animal foods fatten, clog arteries, and destroy bones.

    • Dr George FS says:

      I think the point is that without measurement people will not be able to see firstly where they are and secondly where they are heading.
      If you are going to be scientific about your improvements without regular observations you will be floating in the dark.

    • Anonymous says:

      Type your reply…

    • Anonymous says:

      Michael,
      Doug’s attitude was my attitude. What would I do if I found out my total cholesterol was 300 or my LDL 200? Go on a low-fat diet? Take a statin? I doubt it. So why bother checking when you’re committed to your own research. Still my wife made a good point and the Oz show changed the formula a bit.
      Best,
      gt

      • I have total cholesterol over 300…
        Yes it is disconcerting despite the rationalizations, even for one similarly committed to believing the science.

      • I have been eating this way for three years, now, since being diagnosed as prediabetic in February, 2008, and finding Dr.Richard Bernstein’s The Diabetes Solution shortly thereafter. I dropped 40 pounds, and have kept my BGs under control. While my HDL and triglycerides have improved, my total cholesterol and LDL have not:

        At diagnosis, my lipid panel looked like this:

        TC: 248
        LDL (direct): 190
        HDL: 40
        Trig: 148

        Two years later, it looked like this:

        TC: 357
        LDL: 231
        HDL: 95
        Trig: 44

        In between, it was slightly higher. After a few conversations with my doctor and one of her partners, during which I made clear my extreme reluctance to take statins, she has decided that she doesn’t need to track my cholesterol.

        • Anonymous says:

          But don’t you know that your high-fat, high-protein diet is horrible for you? :-) ))))

        • Magarietha Zondagh says:

          Hi Jerome, I hail from Afrikanerdom (the white Afrikaans speaking lot in South Africa) and a lot of us carry a faulty gene that gives us familial hypercholesterolaemia in different types of the disease. I would be over the moon if my numbers were like yours without pills. My natural cholesterol levels are way over 400 (imperial – struggled to work it out). In the metric system it’s betweeen 11 and 13 without pills. I don’t use statins because it gives me rhabdomyolises, so my whole family are on a fibrate type of drug together with ezetimibe. AND, I am also on this diet. Nothing in the world changes my cholesterol. I once went on a veg only diet without pills for a full month (was miserable) and my cholesterol afterwards was the highest it ever was. If I had YOUR cholesterol I would never worry again in my life.

  9. Anonymous says:

    Well done Mrs Taubes. Sensible move.

    Happy birthday for 30th April, Gary.

    How come the test doesn’t include a Magnesium reading? That’s also part of heart health, I understand.

    Nina

  10. Anonymous says:

    Gary

    I’ve just tried to post the link to this on Dr Oz’s site by your episode, but it repeatedly ignores my log in. Coincidence? I’ve sent it to Dr Oz via the ‘contact us’ button.

    Nina

  11. Anonymous says:

    OK my mistake. Message should appear on Dr Oz site with the link.

    Nina

  12. Mr. Taubes – I’m curious as to why this article only discussed sugar’s suspected health impacts. If I understand your arguments elsewhere, you believe/suspect all carbs to be implicated in these health problems. Perhaps you limited the scope of this article to very specifically address the potential health problems that stem from glucose and sucrose, but if you feel that all carbs are equally suspect, I would have thought you’d at least mention starches as well. Am I correct in thinking that starches are still high on your list of suspected contributors to metabolic syndrome?

    • Dana Seilhan says:

      I don’t know about Gary’s take on this but I do know indigenous groups have been documented eating starchy tubers without the degenerative diseases we get here. It may be that in the absence of excess sugar, starch is not quite as bad for you.

      Mind you, we seem to have a multi-whammy going on here.

      Choline is thought to be protective against fructose’s adverse effects on the liver. Best sources of choline: eggs and liver. We are discouraged against eating eggs and liver.

      Vitamin K2 (not K1, which must be converted, and is converted poorly) aids in the production of the substance osteocalcin, which in turn stimulates the fat cells to release adiponectin, which increases insulin sensitivity. Best sources of K2? Animal foods, particularly grass-fed dairy, and they must be full-fat since K is a fat-soluble vitamin. We are discouraged from eating full-fat dairy; indeed, in many cases, we’re discouraged from any dairy at all. The only reason the government’s holding out on dairy and telling us to keep consuming it but cut the fat is so many people still believe dairy is the best source of dietary calcium.

      Vitamin A is beginning to be linked to diabetes prevention. Most people try to get their vitamin A from beta carotene, yet research suggests that as many as 40 to 50 percent of us are not able to convert enough beta carotene to adequately meet our vitamin A needs. Again, the best source of vitamin A? Liver.

      And of course we are discouraged from eating animal fats and told that polyunsaturated oils are the most healthful for us. Yet these are inflammatory in the body, and systemic inflammation is linked strongly with diabetes.

      I could go on and on. So many puzzle pieces and they all add up to wrecked health.

    • Anonymous says:

      Hi Douglas,
      I do think it’s possible, even likely, that sugars trigger the initial insulin resistance and then that in turn makes all carbs. It’s the simplest possible explanation for why some populations eating carb-rich diets have high levels of obesity and diabetes and some don’t. The latter — the Southeast Asians, for instance — don’t eat sugar. The former do. But more than anything as soon as I write about all carbs, it looks like I’m doing my schtick again and the way the media works, the schtick has to be new. So by focusing exclusively on sugar I could get the story into print. Had I branched out anywhere along the way into the dangers of all carbs, I’d appear to be treading on familiar ground. So I made compromises to get the story into print — but I think what it says is important, obviously, and most likely right. The ultimate question is whether you can trigger metabolic syndrome with starches, or whether they exacerbate it. I don’t know, but I’m willing to buy that they make it worse and it’s sugar that triggers it. And I’m hoping that the NYT M article will help motivate the NIH to fund the necessary studies to find out.
      Thanks for the thoughtful question.
      gt

      • Warren Dew says:

        I thought southeast Asians ate quite a bit of fruit, and therefore sugar?

        • Amanda says:

          Fruit usually has a lot of fibre as well as sugar, so it slows down the processing of fructose. Overall fibre content is probably pretty high, since we’d eat a lot of raw vegetables too. I guess that’s a difference that makes a difference. All but one of the diabetic SE Asians I know (I’m Thai-American, so a lot) became so after moving to the US.

          I would not say that SE Asians don’t eat refined sugar, though. Many savory Thai dishes have small amounts sugar added, and desserts can be VERY sweet. Normally the serving size on sweets is quite small though. I actually think the SE Asian diet is a good argument for moderation in all things (except for chili peppers, which are always to be used to excess), with a bias towards less-processed foods. My Thai grandmother is currently pushing 100, with no particular health regimen at all. So you can pry white rice from my cold dead hands. :)

          • Anonymous says:

            And you Thai’s also eat a lot of coconut milk. and you are not afraid of saturated fat from beef, pork and chicken. (I love Thai food and Indian food. It’s my downfall when it comes to reducing carbs.) And that probably works to slow the rate at which all the carbs–sugar, rice, etc.–enter the bloodstream and so moderate the amount of insulin floating around. I think it’s possible to eat carbs in moderation if (and this is a big if) you have never eaten low fat, high carb, (with massive amounts of sugar) as so many people in this country have on the advice of our good government and medical profession. Mediterranean populations as well as Southeast Asians do and–correct me if I’m wrong–I believe they don’t have the widespread chronic health problems that we do. Because they have always eaten carbs, especially sugar, in moderation along with plenty of good fats.

      • I think your approach to this article makes a lot of sense when looked at from another direction as well. When trying to get science to look at the question of carbs in general, it’s a pretty broad subject with a lot of ways to set up studies into the subject. But if you can get initial testing to be focused on something a little more specific, i.e. sugar’s effects, perhaps answers can be uncovered more quickly, and be more useful in breaking the hegemony of ‘fat/calories are the culprit’ thinking. Thanks for taking the time to answer.

      • I think that the Asian population that doesn’t get obese eating high carb foods are simply less glutinous people with fewer and lesser varieties of food available to them anyway. — There is also the fact that about 25% of our population right here in the United States that eats high carb diets are thin and average people despite the way they eat. — Again less glutinous. They just enjoy their “buzz” at a certain level and consciously stay that way without overindulging.

        • M says:

          Good comment – I think you meant ‘gluttonous’ – as in being a glutton.

        • Anonymous says:

          It appears you haven’t read Gary’s seminal work, “Good Calories, Bad Calories” or his more recent book, “Why We Get Fat and What to do about it”. If you had, you’d know it’s not about gluttony or the lack thereof. And thin does not necessarily equate with healthy. My friend’s husband has always had a sweet tooth and preferred cookies and bread to meat at every turn. Did he get fat? No. He remains quite normal in proportion, but developed type II diabetes. Sadly he prefers drugs, rather than diet, to control his diabetes and cholesterol and his doctor encourages him in this. He’ll probably die of a heart attack in the not too distant future!

          • It’s not about gluttony unless your a glutton and many of us are just that. Closeted or otherwise! You equated thin with healthy, not me! — Sugar and hybrid carbohydrates and carbohydrates in general, are all deadly poisons. Simple as that!

        • Anonymous says:

          If you look closer you will see that they are skinny fat.

        • Miriam says:

          Ha. Have to disagree with this too. A little background: I just have started losing weight on this diet; quite a bit in the last month or two, despite not worrying about it too much over Thanksgiving. I’m overweight, but previous to trying this I’ve been working hard to make sure we were eating well: only whole grains (I made all our bread from scratch, and we never touched white rice or white flour, except for cakes on holidays and birthdays), almost no sugar (just holidays or birthdays), lots and lots of vegetables and fruit. I was making us only boneless, skinless chicken or fish. I cooked with olive oil only and that in low amounts. We had a very little cheese, and occasionally some nuts. We ate the Food Pyramid very strictly. But we just kept getting bigger and bigger, slowly, over those 3 years. I had just given up losing weight. What was the use? We were eating the same or less than everyone around us, I was always hungry, but I couldn’t lose a pound. I would eat, loading up on as many whole grains as possible because that was supposed to make you feel full, only to be starving an hour later. We just talked about that last night, as we marvelled how this diet makes you feel full and I never crave anything anymore: how many times previously I would be near tears an hour after eating because I was truly, really HUNGRY. It wasn’t that I just wanted to eat, or craved something sweet or anything like that. I was actually really hungry, like I’d just run a marathon. My only hope was just to eat well and basically healthy, even if fat, by avoiding all refined grains and most sugar, as well as saturated fat and toxic food. I never wanted to move a muscle if I could help it, and had to force myself to exercise. I never had that “exercise high” that lots of people love to talk about, where you exercise hard for about 20 minutes and then feel like you’re walking on air or something. I would finish and then just collapse, utterly and completely exhausted. Since eating this way, I am never hungry and never tired. I sometimes jump on the elliptical or go for a bike ride or walk just because I have so much energy I can’t work at my desk anymore!

          So that’s the lead up. The import store where we shop is a big stop for a lot of Western foreigners at lunch time. Some of them buy stuff for lunch; others just an after-lunch snack. I see the same groups every time: ultra-fashionable, skinny-as-a-rail Europeans for the most part, almost all under 40. (Because we’re all expatriates, it tends to be very young people who come. Then they leave later in life. It’s relatively rare to see a Westerner over 50 who isn’t a tourist.)

          The women tend to come in and buy a lot of fruit. The men? 10 of them stand in line, every one of them with a candy bar and 1/2 a liter of Coke. Every one. They love Ritter Sport chocolate bars from Germany. When I would get in line with my whole wheat flour and an entire cart full of fruits and vegetables, with maybe 4 chicken breasts and a some deep water fish from New Zealand, they would stare pointedly at me like I was the dirt scrapped off the bottom of their shoes (often making rude comments as well). Then proceed to buy and eat 1,000 calories worth of candy bars and soda. Two days ago I walked up to the store as a very tall, impossibly think European man walked out. He gave me a look of disdain and pushed past me: as he shoved an entire bag of candy into his coat pocket.

          “Thin” means nothing for people like that. Now when I see them I feel terrible for them, because I realize how horribly unhealthy they really are. Meanwhile they feel so safe in their thinness that they think they can eat anything, and are killing themselves in the process.

        • Miriam says:

          Oh, and there’s this: ” I think that the Asian population that doesn’t get obese eating high carb foods are simply less glutinous people with fewer and lesser varieties of food available to them anyway.”

          We had a good laugh at that. Obviously you’ve never seen lots of Asians eating.

      • Anonymous says:

        As soon as I saw the sugar article, I thought, “he should have written that BEFORE Big Fat Lie, GCBC, and Why We Get Fat.” It would have established your credibility and made it a whole lot easier to go out on the carbs-are-what’s-evil limb. Who knows, it might have changed the course of the obesity epidemic!

      • Aha! I’m glad I found this response. I initially had the same question, and even posted on Huffpo that I guessed that you had to go the “sugar is dangerous” route to get this article published. Brilliant, as always!

  13. I love it. Well done. Eventually, the world will wake up and realise that we were designed to eat plenty of protein and saturated fat, and that the new carb loaded diets are making us sick. One day soon I hope. My blog talks about similar issues: http://christinecronau.com/the-great-cholesterol-myth/

  14. Anonymous says:

    too funny. congrats on being healthy! where was the caveat about these numbers not meaning anything and the question being what would the numbers be if you were eating a different diet? ;) you are clearly please and it is very much deserved! i am glad that we will get to continue reading your work for a long time to come. now, keep your eyes on the road!

  15. Anonymous says:

    Gary that is fantastic! My wife and I have been following a lo-carb dietary plan since Feb. 21. Due, in large part, to your books and the New Atkins book. We feel fantastic! Additionally, my wifes blood glucose levels, which have been under questionable control for some time now, IMMEDIATELY fell into normal range. (Fasting <110, 2 hrs after eating <140). She was thrilled. We go in for fasting blood work on April 25, with the results appointment the following week. We are very excited about seeing the results.

    Thank you, for the research, the long hours, and tireless effort you have put into both your books. You have given us inspiration to be healthy, and possibly extended our lives for several years.

    Chuck G.
    Wichita, KS

  16. Anonymous says:

    Looking good Gary.. I bet you feel great!

  17. This is a conversation that addresses the short term and the “numbers” of a particular issue. Is this the issue of most concern, or does is distract us from a bigger understanding. What of the effects our systems experience in the long term development of disease and illness. What of inflammation and the correlation between protein levels, especially animal sources and incidence of cancers and other systems breakdown. (The China Study). Absolutely, there is imbalance and over dependence on carbohydrate calories. The direction of best utilization of nutrients in support of cell health is with plant based foods.

  18. NomadicNeill says:

    Great stuff.

    Gary although you have a big following in the paleo and crossfit spheres you never mention them.

    Is this because you’re afraid that it will be too easy for the mainstream media to dismiss you if you seem to align yourself with them?

    • Dana Seilhan says:

      Gary hardly ever *blogs,* I think he just wants to get said what most needs to be said and move on. He sounds like a pretty busy guy.

    • Anonymous says:

      In all honesty, it just never came up. I’m more worried about being perceived as an Atkins acolyte than an ally of the paleo and crossfit camps. And even with my anxieties about Atkins, I believe in giving credit where due, even if it costs me.
      gt

  19. Anonymous says:

    Very good, Gary.

    Quick question: do you supplement with vitamin D at all? Your levels are very good.

    • Anonymous says:

      Yes. Over the counter D3.
      gt

      • tickyul tickyul says:

        You do know that there are various websites where you can order just about any bloodtest, no doctor visit needed?????

        • Putterman says:

          That’s not actually true in NYS where Gary resides. The NYS Dept. of Health requires a doctors prescription for a blood test because people are too stupid to manage their own health (a little sarcasm).

  20. Jim says:

    Looks pretty good to me. Regarding your diet: you mention grass-fed beef for dinner. Are your other food selections pastured or free-range?

    • Anonymous says:

      Hi Jim,
      Free-range and grass-fed as much as possible, but with kids, compromises are made for what they’ll eat. Although having read Eating Animals by Safran Foer, I always feel guilty for the compromises.
      gt

  21. Sue says:

    “Large boyant LDL”, great Triglycerides, <1 risk factor….awesome!!! Would love to see Dr Oz match that. Although I heard that he secretly does eat what most would consider low carb, but still probably not as healthy as you. You are my hero! I sent you a long email a couple days ago.

  22. Sue says:

    “Large boyant LDL”, great Triglycerides, <1 risk factor….awesome!!! Would love to see Dr Oz match that. Although I heard that he secretly does eat what most would consider low carb, but still probably not as healthy as you. You are my hero! I sent you a long email a couple days ago.

  23. Pablo Silva says:

    Further adieu? I’m sure you meant further ado, right?

  24. Gary, I’m looking forward to the day when you are finally able to get into the mental aspects in all this. — Patiently waiting! — To big a pill to swallow in this day and age to be sure. — Your New York Times April 13 article was well thought out and a wonderful piece of work! Exceptional! You are a gifted communicator who has moved this thing along ten years or more.

    Yours Truly
    Tom Bunnell

  25. You can go to a Walgreen’s or CVS or other drug stores in your area and get a lipid panel without a prescription.

    Also, are you in Michigan?

    • Anonymous says:

      Nope. He’s in Cali. But I too wonder why the lab-prescribing doctor is from Livonia, MI. I googled him and he seems to be a quack-weightloss doctor. He gives weight-loss injections and advocates eating a canned “cat food diet” (not real cat food). Strange, no?

      • g says:

        I was wondering about that too, after reading your post. The guy does seem kinda fishy, at least how he presents himself. And the emphasis on injections and pre-packaged bars, etc. Odd that Taubes would go through him when the idea was probably to appear legitimate to people who follow Oz, etc. Maybe just someone he knows from conferences who could quickly order a panel? Weird, though…

        • Anonymous says:

          who nagler is has no bearing on whether the results are credible. red herring.

          • g says:

            I don’t think it does either. But appearances matter in the court of public opinion, so I wondered why go with someone with a website like that when folks like carbsane will run with it? I figured Gary just needed a script and hit up someone he knew, and it sounds like that’s the case. If Oz posted results from some woo-woo psychic surgeon type, people would bring it up also.

          • Anonymous says:

            you cant really guard against logical fallacies; thats whats so great about em–theyre versatile. it really doesnt matter what gary does. thing is, the results arent coming from a woo woo guy; theyre coming from quest.

          • g says:

            Yes, but he got his labs through someone with a diet website who comes off kind of quack-ish. For someone who talks so much about “bad science” and “these were some of the worst scientists” and all that, it’s an odd choice is all. It doesn’t make the results bad, but it does make even me, who’s read GCBC and bought like four copies for friends/relatives, etc., wonder about his judgement a little. I would imagine that someone who just saw Taubes on Oz and happened to Google the doctor’s name or read Carbsane’s take or what-have-you, they might just write Taubes (and his ideas) off, unfortunately.

          • Anonymous says:

            but nagler didnt do the science… your questioning garys judgment over this logical fallacy makes me question your judgment. if they write his ideas off for it, theyre fools. good riddance.

          • g says:

            It’s not a logical fallacy. Posting lab results with someone’s name on them who comes off online as being a bit of a quack could be seen as a lapse in judgement. That’s all. If someone is listed as your doctor, that can come off as some sort of endorsement, intended or not. And since the point of listing the results was to ease the minds of those newly reading his works for the most part, it seems like something worth commenting on other than “he’s a friend.” Like whether Taubes is a supporter of appetite suppression injections and “the cat food diet” and all that. Either Taubes is okay with that stuff, or he didn’t know that aspect of Nagler’s practice. I’m kind of curious as to which.

            I’m not trying to make more out of it than that. I’m not saying it means anything about the veracity of what Taubes argues, which is where a logical fallacy would come into play (“Taubes is wrong – his bloodwork was signed by a quack.” Not saying that.). I’ve spent plenty of time trying to hip people to what Taubes says, so I’m not some knee-jerk critic. And I’ve spend hours upon hours (way too much time actually) pointing out actual logical fallacies in the online postings of T. Colin Campbell. Anyway, I get so tired of people, regardless of where they fall on an issue, acting like whoever they champion is unassailable. Nutrition is seeming more and more like religion, unfortunately.

          • g says:

            Also, the volume I’m writing about this is a gross distortion of how much I care about the topic. It’s the “logical fallacy” responses that I’m responding to, mostly…although I am curious about Taubes’ view of Nagler’s practice. But I’m much more interested in seeing Oz post his own results, or explain why he thought replacing salmon with steak on his show with Taubes in his ridiculous “one-day diet” was anything but disingenuous. Or what “the sacredness of food” means in the world of science that he allegedly holds dear. Or why he treated Taubes with such hostility and yet has con men like John Edward on his show (“Someone in the audience has lost someone whose name starts with “D”…).

          • Anonymous says:

            nagler didnt produce the results. his name is of no consequence to anyone other than the irrational. trying to mitigate susceptibility to logically fallacious arguments is impractical, since by definition they arent dependent on facts anyway.

          • g says:

            Did you even read what I wrote?

          • Anonymous says:

            i did.

          • g says:

            I can’t ever have a worthwhile point because “his name is of no consequence to anyone but the irrational”? I was about to point out how this utilizes a logical fallacy (not that your repeatedly just shouting “logical fallacy” without being specific is much better either), but in reading it again I’ve just suddenly got the feeling you’re quite aware of that fact and that I’ve been trolled, so I’m going to bow out.

          • Anonymous says:

            no. but you had no point to make anyway. run along.

          • g says:

            Charming.

          • Anonymous says:

            cute

          • BeezerQ says:

            Quest Diagnostics is a large business of medical testing labs in the US. According to their FAQ, a doctor’s order is required to have a lab test done, as patients cannot order tests themselves.

            http://www.questdiagnostics.com/common/faq/faq_patient_inquiry.html#requesting1

            Gary Taubes lives in Berkeley, California, and Dr. Nagler is in Michigan. After getting Nagler’s lab order, Mr. Taubes probably went to a local Quest office to have his blood drawn. It is not necessary to go to the doctor’s office to have the test done.

            Quest probably does thousands of lab tests daily, and Mr. Taubes’ would have been one among many.

            Who ordered the tests is irrelevant — only the results count.

          • Anonymous says:

            This is precicely what I was concerned about – the public opinion of critics.

          • g says:

            Where did I say the results weren’t credible?

      • Anonymous says:

        Bill Nagler is a bariatric physician and a friend. I haven’t got a physician in California — just moved out a year ago — so I asked Bill for the script. Nothing nefarious. Just easy.
        gt

      • Anonymous says:

        What difference does it make who the doctor providing the script is? He didn’t do the tests, the lab did!

        • Anonymous says:

          I’m not disputing the lab results. I just wondered what the Michigan connection was because I live here. The first thing that sprang to mind was “Is this a good, low-carb friendly doctor? I could use one of those!”. But upon investigation he seems to be a very unusual doctor. Not someone I would have pictured GT aligning with. Gary responded that it is his friend. See what “g” said below. No need to get defensive. I’m not an Oz supporter or a Taubes critic. Just a curious low-carber.

  26. Bkayser says:

    It’s one thing to argue in favor of a low carb diet because we are dubious of the conventional wisdom of blood cholesterol – we won’t play “their” game. But it’s remarkable to entirely dismiss the established recommendations for a healthy diet and still optimize conventional blood cholesterol – “they” don’t even know how to play “their” own game. While others may have a blasé impression of these numbers, I’m blown away (and I’m sure Gary can’t help but feel a little victorious). I’ll join Gary and stick with my daily three-egg and cheese breakfast.

    • Ian Graves says:

      First of all, the scientific evidence makes it quite clear that there is a link between cholesterol and heart disease. For example, in all the years of the Framingham Heart Study, noone with a total cholesterol <150 has had a heart attack. To say that figure is coincidence would be delusional.

      Additionally, "they" can indeed play "their" own game. The typical LDL of someone on a plant-based diet is <80, generally even lower, not Taubes's 116. Here is a standard example: http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/diet-changes-lower-disease-risk-pt-1. Just 12 weeks on a plant-based diet and LDL dropped from 157 to 80. The Tarahumara Indians, who traditionally ate plant-based diets and had no diseases of affluence, often had LDL levels of ~50.

      It is possible that Dr. Robert Lustig is right, and both high-fat, animal-based, diets and low-fat, plant-based, diets can be healthy if sugar is cut out. It seems unlikely that such diametrically opposed diets, however, could both be healthy for the human body. Keep in mind that Dr. Robert Atkins lived to 72. Donald Watson, the founder of veganism, lived to 95. Dr. Esselstyn is 77 and going strong. Dr. T. Colin Campbell is 76 and going strong.

      • Mary says:

         Dr. Atkins slipped on the ice while walking to work — so his death at the age of 72 proves nothing.
        (http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/atkinsdiet/a/dratkinsdeath.htm)

      • Anonymous says:

        I’d like to see a credible source for your claim about the Framingham data, because I find it hard to believe.  Total cholesterol isn’t even considered a good predictor today.

        And cardiovascular disease, of course, isn’t the whole of medicine. All-cause mortality matters much more, and the authors of “Serum cholesterol levels and six-year mortality from stroke in
        350,977 men screened for the multiple risk factor intervention trial” report that at serum cholesterol levels below 160 mg/dl, all-cause mortality actually *increases*, while at levels up to 200 mg/dl, the increase is negligible. They found coronary heart disease reductions with declining total cholesterol, yet even at <140 mg/dl, the rates were well above zero.

        The graph is reproduced here: http://www.healthforeveryone.org/tag/mortality
        and the abstract is on PubMed.

        • The data are good that high cholesterol in the Framingham study correlated with heart disease.  This is a classic case that is taught in statistics courses but as in my answer to Robert Mauri, this is different saying that if you lower cholesterol with diet that that will make any difference in outcome.  

      • David Nelsen says:

        Ian, if you read Good Calories, Bad Calories – you will see that cholesterol under 160 is bad for mortality but not necessarily bad for strokes/heart attacks.  You need to dodge all potential killers, not just heart disease and the graphs in the book show issues below 160 and above 260. 

      • Robert Mauri says:

        You could, though likely won’t, read many books that discuss Framingham in more detail, such as Fat and Cholesterol are Good for You, by Dr. Ravnskov, in which the overall death rate is a bath tub curve (high at low total cholesterol and high at high total cholesterol, with lower death rates in the middle).  But really, Framingham doesn’t matter as this is epidemiological evidence, which proves correlation not causation.  Moreover, many studies indicate that lowering total cholesterol does nothing for improving heart disease and that it’s incredibly hard to lower cholesterol through diet.  I could go on and on…

        • The goal is not to reduce cholesterol.  The Framingham study showed that there was no correlation between dietary total fat, saturated fat, dietary cholesterol and heart disease.  The argument was that because saturated fat raised cholesterol and cholesterol correlated with heart disease, therefore saturated fat caused heart disease.  Not all operations are transitive like equality (A=B, B=C, therefore A=C).  Because the Framingham data is statistical, you must show that the same people whose dietary SF correlated with higher cholesterol are also the ones whose high cholesterol correlated with heart disease.  This was obviously not the case since A did not predict C.  I tried to make an analogy between focussing on secondary markers with the point in Moneyball that baseball focussed scouts looked at speed and athletic ability rather than the ability to actually produce runs ( http://wp.me/p16vK0-80 )

  27. Mark Lanza says:

    Well it appears that your lipid levels are indeed something to be satisfied with. Mine, on the other hand, dramatically worsened after switching to a diet similar to yours. In fact, my current LDL numbers are now higher than what my previous total cholesterol figure was.

    Can’t figure it out ~

    • Laurie D says:

      There are a number of factors to consider. It takes a good 5 to 6 months to see the best results. Numbers can have dramatic temporary changes earlier than that following a switch to a low carb diet, particularly if you eat at ketogenic levels. Further, if you only know your total LDL number, but don’t know the subtypes, your LDL number is meaningless. If it’s higher but it’s all Pattern Type A, that’s fine.

      • Mark Lanza says:

        See my reply above to Dana. I’m well aware of the apolipoproteins and their affects on CVD. My question is simply why do lipids increase. I’m not the first person to notice this.

    • Dana Seilhan says:

      LDL is the lipoprotein that carries cholesterol away from the liver into other parts of the body. Sometimes cholesterol is used as a repair molecule. Is there anything else going on with your health that might need repairing?

      • Mark Lanza says:

        Everything else on the blood panel tested fine, from CRP to A1C to mineral levels to thyroid to testosterone…and on. I purchased a glucometer, and glucose readings have never exceeded 100, even after meals.

        I had a typical lipid panel done, and also a VAP. The B/A ratio of LDL was OK, but my overall CH soared from 271 to 348, with triglycerides increasing as well.
        I’ve been full paleo since Oct ’08, and am not on a ketogenic diet.

    • Anonymous says:

      If LDL goes up because LDL type became type A (large and fluffy) its a good thing.

  28. I read the sugar article and loved it! I remember when I was a kid, many decades ago, sugar was evil. Then the low fat fad happened and sugar wasn’t evil anymore, fat was.

    Hey, those results look good, except maybe for the VLDL. Your D3 levels are rather low too. You might find some of your cholesterol results improve if you increase your D3. Dr. Davis of http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com has had wonderful results (verified by coronary calcium scans) fixing calcium deposits in the cornary arteries, and subsequently improving cholesterol scores, by making sure his patients have good blood levels of D3.

    Anyway, you did get the good test so I assume they directly counted your LDL particles instead of calculating them. I hear the Friedewald calculation gets messed up if your triglycerides are below 100. So low carbers should get VAP tests to get more realistic results.

  29. Anonymous says:

    I’d love to see Dr. Ornish’s lipid panel.

  30. John Hanson says:

    Awesome typing, hs-CRP, and TG values. Ignored the rest *grin*

  31. Jimmy Moore says:

    Gary, awesome numbers! Your HDL and trigs say it all. Go boy! And I was surprised by how high your Vitamin D3 numbers were. Do you hang out in the sun a lot or do you high-dose supplement?

    • Anonymous says:

      Hi Jimmy,
      Supplement, since there hasn’t been any sun here in Berkeley for the past few months. I may have to write an article on the vitamin D story just so I can learn for myself what the science says. At the moment, I’m just going with the flow since so many people I respect recommend it.
      gt

    • Anonymous says:

      Hi Jimmy,
      Supplement, since there hasn’t been any sun here in Berkeley for the past few months. I may have to write an article on the vitamin D story just so I can learn for myself what the science says. At the moment, I’m just going with the flow since so many people I respect recommend it.
      gt

      • No sun in Berkeley?! Surely we have entered dark times.

        • Anonymous says:

          Yeah, the Bay Area has been more like Seatle the California.

          Gary, I’m digesting your audio book as quickly as I can (pun intended).  I’ve already made a change in my diet to reduce sugar intake and eliminate carbs.  So far today I’ve have a ton of energy and been able to concentrate through some pretty mundane tasks with out getting drowsy or loosing focus.  I’ve gotten pretty overweight over the years and I always figured it was my sedentary job and the fact I stopped playing hockey.  My first day into this paradigm shift and I feel better then I have in years.

  32. Twinkie diet also reduced cholesterol levels. http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/11/08/twinkie.diet.professor/index.html

    • Dana Seilhan says:

      And that guy also lost something like 8 pounds of lean mass and his bodyfat level was just under obesity for his age and activity level. He posted his body comp test results on Facebook and I went and looked at them. Lower cholesterol does not mean better cholesterol. It’s the particle numbers and size that matter, if anything about cholesterol matters at all.

      Also, that guy cheated. He did not live on only Twinkies. He also ate vegetables and took a multivitamin. I believe he also said he drank a protein shake every day but it’s been so long since I read his stuff that I don’t remember for sure now.

    • in addition to what Dana said, it’s also worth noting that losing weight is pretty much a sure-fire way of lowering cholesterol. And we’d probably see the pattern B on his test.

    • Anonymous says:

      twinkie diet guy should get a darwin award (i know, he didn’t die so it doesn’t count)! anyone following that diet, for whatever reason, is just thinning the herd. nice knowing you…

    • Paula says:

      Here’s Tom Naughton (of “Fat Head”) who ran the numbers.

      http://www.fathead-movie.com/index.php/2010/11/16/the-twinkie-diet/

      And explains them. This is THE answer to the “Twinkie Diet” B.S. Gary posted it as a response in his latest Is Sugar Toxic article.

  33. Very nice! What do you suppose would have happened had you checked your cholesterol on the dr Oz show? Your numbers might actually be better than those of dr Oz… :)

    Besides, they mention you on Huffington Post today (not a very intelligent blog post though):
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-katz-md/sugar-health-evil-toxic_b_850032.html

  34. Anonymous says:

    I eat pretty identically as Gary, and started eating that way about 13 months ago. I had a cholesterol test after about a month on the diet and totals were higher (I later read something about that being reflective of fat I was losing breaking down and being more measurable in the blood at first) and of course my doctor freaked out and wanted me to take statins (which I thankfully refused). I was recently retested and this was about 12 months into the diet, and my totals were higher than Gary’s (267 total), but I have high HDL (74) and I got tested for LDL particle type, and found I had an even better type A fluffy reading than Gary’s. So I believe I am probably genetically predisposed to somewhat higher readings, but I don’t buy into the typical medical establishment reaction that the total is all that matters. I’m 61, I have no health issues whatsoever, and my weight is again normal thanks to over a year on this type of diet. After a lifetime of feeling terrible due to how I ate (lots of sugar!!), a really low carb, grainless, sugarless way of eating has been a revelation to me. My body shape and weight normalized when I started eating this way.

    • Paula says:

      CMCM49: I’m curious. What made you change how you were eating? (FYI for hubby and myself, it was reading GCBC – AND this was of eating was a revelation to us as well!)

      • Anonymous says:

        Paula, before reading GCBC I had already learned that I did best on that sort of diet through doing a fairly traditional Atkins program. Eliminating grains and thus gluten led me to realize I had celiac disease, and that I was also extremely carb sensitive. Eliminating those things along with sugar made such a positive change in all aspects of my health, not to mention allowing me to easily drop the weight I wanted to lose and get back to what I consider my “normal” state. So GCBC and then WWGF both really illuminated the “WHY” of all my good results from eating this way. Suddenly it all made such sense. I originally embarked on Atkins to lose about 30 pounds but learned so much more along the way!

        • Paula says:

          CMCM49: Nice, thank you for the answer! Hubby and I too have learned so much more along the way! His acid reflux which had plagued him all his life went away immediately, we don’t get colds (well, we’ve each had one in a year, but brief — with symptoms amazingly attenuated; a great visual for how this can possibly be is to be seen on YouTube: Jorge Cruise’s “Death by Sugar” — one sees in a darkfield microscope blood of a guy who has lost 47 lbs being on Atkins BEFORE and 15 mins AFTER a carb/sugar binge — and the ‘whys’ of the great health changes of LCHF become clear; blood cells before are separate, round, and truly beautiful; the post-carb/sugar-binge rouleaux and spicules are truly hideous, and if you wiki rouleaux, cancer is mentioned prominently…Tho I’m not saying this takes precedence over GTs “Is Sugar Toxic”s “mot” that fatty liver seems to be the harbinger of all that follows via metabolic syndrome…Yet the beautiful blood of LCHF makes one understand the ‘whys’ at least of the energy and sense of well being one feels; and the ability to fight infection…).

          Other health benefits noticed: joint pain completely gone, daily sleepiness gone – we’re in our mid-50s and feel like we’re in our 20s. Crazy energy. Prior to 3/21/10 when we started, we’d never been off carbs & sugar our entire lives. Not for a single day. He lost 25 lbs, I lost 20, in 4 mos, with zero exercise at that point. My TGs 105 to 54; HDL 52 to 65. Another inspiration is to google and watch “The Unconquerable Dave’s” submission with photos to marksdailyapple.com! Amazing.

          Funny thing: Watching the game with friends on Thanksgiving. All the guys in a row on the couch. Big Belly #1, Big Belly #2, Big Belly #3, Flat Belly #1 (my hubby), and Big Belly #4. Big Belly #4 points to his (Big Belly #4′s) belly, then hubby’s belly and says, “Hey, what’s up with that?” Ha ha ha! If you knew this guy! His joking insinuation was, “Hey, we’re ‘normal’ – what’s up with you?”

          After being blessed truly by personal knowledge of LCHF’s efficacy in reaching, as you say, one’s “normal” state, it becomes poignant and disturbing to see all about one people to whom GT’s (and Robert Atkins’) message is obviously essential. Yet one is separated from them by a wall that human communication can’t breach. And if you try, it’s like telling an alcoholic “Put down that drink and you can get your life and your loved ones back” but he cannot, being owned, and I mean owned, by his problem. Maybe we’re lousy communicators: I think I’ll have a card that says “Taubes” printed out to hand to anyone who comments on how hubby and I now look. And refuse to say more!

          I think the secret is, people have to learn each thing (that GCBC teaches) themselves. They have to be disabused of notions (with GCBC’s proofs) one at a time (a wonderful process as those who have read GCBC can attest), that one pent-up schpiel just can’t teach them. They need to be initiated into the secrets themSELVES. By an education THEY seek.

          The cancer not seen in traditional diets, but rampant in Western ones: My best girlfriend, my age (56) got CANCER last summer (actually, she’s Big Belly #4′s wife) and after radiation and lots of hope that it had been squelched for good; it returned last month – now it’s chemo and radiation. And now this woman who has taught me so much in my life is probably going down for the count. She won’t give up the carbs and sugar (tho in WWGF which hubby and I just reread, there is one mention of LCHF curing cancer potentially, if memory serves; it would certainly prolong her life). I’ve promised not to bother her any more after subjecting her to my schpiel – before her 1st encounter with the cancer I’d given her a copy of GCBC…but people are resistant… :-/ Even tho she says she KNOWS Atkins works ’cause she’s done it…

  35. donmatesz says:

    Great results Gary, and you also provided more data against the D’Adamo blood type theory. According to him, people with A-type blood should eat vegetarian diets and get high lipids and increased heart disease risk when eating meat. Its totally bogus, I debunked it on my blog, and I am going to link to this to show that A-types can eat meat-based diet with excellent results.

    http://donmatesz.blogspot.com/2010/12/blood-type-diet-primal-perspective.html

    • Dana Seilhan says:

      D’Adamo is probably wrong, but you could at least quote him accurately. I’ve read something like three of his books. He does NOT say type As have to be vegetarian, only that they CAN be vegetarian with fewer bad effects. However, he also states that vegetarians fare better on chicken and fish and not so well on red meat, so yes, he’s wrong about that.

  36. Dana Seilhan says:

    Holy dude, you were thorough! Direct count of cholesterol particles! Not Friedenwald! *applause*

    I hope to have numbers as good as yours at some point. It would help if I’d stay on the wagon. Sigh.

  37. I did had my lipid panel (not quite as extensive as this one) this past January and compared it with July 200 when I was low fat/high whole grains and since getting back onto sat fat and off grains by number are all way better (trig down by about 50%, HDL up, LDL down)…my ribs for breakfast the past two days sure tasted better than bran buds!

  38. Glad to see VLDL and hs-CRP included in the test.

    Those were the ones I was most interested in seeing.

  39. Anonymous says:

    Last time I had bloodwork, my HDL was 137. No anomaly….. it’s always in that area since I have been lowcarbing. Been lowcarbing for going on 13 years. Best decision I ever made.

    • My HDL runs between 89 and 110 and I thought that was off the charts! I took an online health evaluation and the drop-down box for HDL stopped at 100. Wow – 137! What does your doctor say?
      The last time I went to my doctor was almost 2 years ago. She is usually pretty open-minded about my lifestyle choices (including the fact that I only go in every 3 years or so and refuse mammograms and colonoscopies and opt for the least expensive screenings which she says are actually OK; I never meet my insurance deductible, so even routine screenings have been out-of-pocket costs; I believe with “Obamacare” these will be covered, so I may go in this summer.) Well, back to the point. Since my HDL was 90, my total cholesterol was “border-line high.” When I received my lab results by mail, she had actually written ” let me know if you want to do something about your cholesterol.” Say what? I thought for a moment that she was joking, but I suspect she wasn’t. It is possible the comment was a “CYA” necessity to avoid potential lawsuits? If I go in to see her in a month or two, I will probably ask her about it. I haven’t had a blood draw since. I thought about going to a health fair where I work and paying the $30 for the lipid profile. Then I thought, what would be the point? I feel fabulous at age 58 and I have no intention of changing anything in my diet/lifestyle, so I saved the time and $30.

  40. Your Vitamin D scores show D2 of 42ng/ml.
    This indicates you’ve been using the prescribed form of vitamin D2 ERGOCALCIFEROL.
    May I suggest you read
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17023693
    The case against ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) as a vitamin supplement.
    Dr Davis’s blogpost The case against vitamin D2
    and
    http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/full/89/11/5387
    Vitamin D2 Is Much Less Effective than Vitamin D3 in Humans
    Over the counter vitamin D3 is much cheaper, safer and more reliable than prescription D2 and it doesn’t speed up the catabolism of the vitamin.

    • Anonymous says:

      Hi Edward,
      Nope, over the counter D3. The Pharmaca store brand in CA.
      gt

      • I had the same thought about D2. My tests always show all of my vitamin D as D3 and 0 D2. Strange.

        Congratulations on the report — I think you are likely to be with us keeping science honest for a good long while.

  41. g lll says:

    I love you Gary and additionally, I’m curious where is the rest of the beef, um, I mean, INSULIN fasting level?? That ALSO would’ve beat the cr*p out of carb-o-philic, sarcopenic, low HDL Doctor Oz’s labs…!!

    Naturally other low carb, high saturated fat (like me) reflect similar metrics as you (not that we need to measure them)
    http://drbganimalpharm.blogspot.com/2009/06/benefits-of-high-saturated-fat-diets_12.html

  42. g lll says:

    I love you Gary and additionally, I’m curious where is the rest of the beef, um, I mean, INSULIN fasting level?? That ALSO would’ve beat the cr*p out of carb-o-philic, sarcopenic, low HDL Doctor Oz’s labs…!!

    Naturally other low carb, high saturated fat (like me) reflect similar metrics as you (not that we need to measure them)
    http://drbganimalpharm.blogspot.com/2009/06/benefits-of-high-saturated-fat-diets_12.html

  43. Andy Lopez says:

    Now to further allay your wife’s fears you should have her tested, for comparison of effects of any differences between your respective diets. Seems like I remember you saying she’s still skeptical & doesn’t eat the same as you, i.e. less fats.

  44. I don’t know, Gary. I’ve got better numbers and I’m a diabetic. Of course, I’m a ketosis prone T2 and we are known for remission. That’s it! You’re in remission. Congratulations.

  45. Dr. Oz’s insistence that high saturated fat must be bad was a reminder to me to get my bloodwork done. The result? Total Cholesterol has gone up as expected, but so is my HDL, by a whopping 43%. Triglycerides are 25% below the low reading of the reference range. I blogged about it here: http://carboholicsanonymous.blogspot.com/2011/04/impact-of-meat-diet-on-triglycerides.html

  46. Bryan Stell says:

    I purposefully made sure to consume a can of coconut milk (full fat) and 85/15 grassfed beef daily for 2 weeks pre-lipid panel. My HDL was 81, LDL 53, TOTal 154 Triglycerides 33. Your liver makes cholesterol regardless of how much saturated fat you make. Might as well consume it.

  47. Oh dear, you are deficient in CO2. What will Oz say?

  48. Anonymous says:

    Take that, Dr. Oz and all the others that continue to insist that a high fat diet is sure to kill you !

  49. Tom Schibler says:

    suck it Oz. Really triglycerides and Vit D numbers

  50. Tom Schibler says:

    suck it Oz. Really nice triglyceride and Vit D numbers.

  51. I’m A Positive too Gary. Can I have some of your blood? :)

  52. Elevated VLDL-3 levels may correspond to an increased risk of heart disease and diabetes because they interact with the vessel walls?

    • Paula says:

      Exactly. In GCBC, p. 172, GT puts it this way: “Small, dense LDL [i.e. VLDL] can squeeze more easily through damaged areas of the artery wall to form incipient atherosclerotic plaques. Sniderman describes small, dense LDL as the equivalent of “little bits of sand” that get in everywhere and stick more avidly.

      “The relative dearth of cholesterol in these particles may also cause structural changes in the protein that make it easier for it to adhere to the artery wall to begin with. And because small, dense LDL apparently remains in the bloodstream longer than larger and fluffier LDL, it has more time and greater opportunities to do its damage.”

  53. Anonymous says:

    Uh, if he’s eating sausage and bacon every day isn’t he significantly increasing his risk of pancreatic and bowel cancer? So, lower your cholesterol then die of bowel cancer? Sorry guys, not buying this. AND – these studies aren’t saying that fat is the unhealthy bit about processed meats – the culprit is one of the additives – so it’s not part of the low-fat conspiracy/dogma industrial complex.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-550729/Why-eating-just-sausage-day-raises-cancer-risk-20-cent.html

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/7921095/Additives-in-sausages-and-bacon-increase-bladder-cancer-riskcan.html

    • I didn’t mean to “like” this. Studies are showing that pancreatic tumors preferentially feed on fructose.

    • Anonymous says:

      1. How do you know he’s not eating sausage and bacon that do not have the (questionably) harmful additives? He didn’t specify. There are plenty of options for bacon and sausage that do not have nitrites and nitrates (I’m assuming those are what you were referring to) and, since he eats grass fed steak, my guess is GT also opts for the more natural processed meats, too. I know I do.
      2. If you don’t want to eat those particular kinds of meats, you can still benefit from his kind of diet. There are plenty of other options for food to eat while still avoiding sugars, starches, and other bad carbohydrates. Then you can avoid cancer AND heart disease, because there is evidence that higher cholesterol levels protects against cancer!

  54. Contact Dr. Oz and ask him to publish this result on his show and comment. It would be interesting to hear what he has to say.

  55. Just got here via your NYT article (really well done, kudos). Your obsession is more fully developed than my own!

    Do you think your BUN number is on the high side because of all the protein metabolism? I’ll have to read more of your site to figure out why you’re not replacing some of that protein with leafy vegetables.

  56. Just got here via your NYT article (really well done, kudos). Your obsession is more fully developed than my own!

    Do you think your BUN number is on the high side because of all the protein metabolism? I’ll have to read more of your site to figure out why you’re not replacing some of that protein with leafy vegetables.

  57. nkosi says:

    Interesting article but what are the implications for fruit consumption if Lustig is right? If I understood the article correctly, frutose is more dangerous than glucose? If this is so, should we avoid fruits where the fructose to glucose ratio is more than say 1? Or should one still be concerned with the total amount of glucose in one’s diet, even if fructose is reduced? How much of each is safe? How much fruit can one eat before elevating fructose to unsafe levels? Is there ANY researched guidance on this?

    • Anonymous says:

      Another thing to note about the fruits we eat is that they are genetically modified to have higher fructose(sweeter) then would occur in nature. That’s because we like sweet things. Wild fruits invariably have lower fructose then farmed fruit.

    • montmorency says:

      I worry that Lustig gives fruits a pass, partly because the fructose is diluted by water, and partly because of the fiber/fibre.

      But how much fiber does, say, an apple contain? Or a melon?
      Not that much I’d think, and they both can taste incredibly sweet. I don’t think the fiber is doing much in the way of slowing down absorption.

      Plus you can get addicted to fruit. I was. I could eat a whole bag of apples, or a bunch of bananas in a sitting. And / or I would combine them with grapes. Or have, say, bananas, grapes, nuts, and – get this – dried fruit in a bowl and pig out on them. No wonder I became overweight and pre-diabetic.

      Now, we don’t hear enough about dried fruit. They sell it in healthfood and wholefood shops and on the healthfood counter of your local supermarket. Sweet, brown and deadly.

      “But Mike, “, I hear you say: “It’s fine in moderation. Normal people don’t pig out on it like you did”.
      Well fine. Good for you little goodie-two-shoes, if you can moderate this stuff.
      I can’t. Perhaps I have an addictive personality, or am, as my Mother might say (or Gary’s Mother might say) just plain greedy.
      So now they have to be a complete no-no for me, at least.
      Other people may do fine on them.
      But then, some other people do fine on white bread and spuds.
      :-)

      Regards,
      Mike Ellwood

  58. Anonymous says:

    Gary, this is spooky. As you know I have also been on the 3 eggs a day, high fat, very low carb diet about 2 years. Just yesterday I had my lipids checked, with almost identical results as yours:
    T Chol 192, TG 65, LDL-C 114, HDL-C 65.3, VLDL 13, Chol/HDL 2.9
    Weight staying mid 180s. Thanks again for your good work.

    • Anonymous says:

      Hi Frank,
      Spooky it is, since you don’t eat any meat at all and I live on it. Nice numbers and nice to hear from you, as ever.
      gt

  59. Anonymous says:

    Gary,

    Even you Lp (a) and Apo B were in the healthy range! I hope you make sure that Dr OZ sees this. Why test cholesterol when you know the numbers will look like this? The reason is that doctors use this, as a measurement of health and proof that low carb is anti-inflammatory and healthy. One last point, the lipid profile demonstrates the effect of inflammation, rather then the cause of inflammation. Way to go!

    Jeffry N. Gerber, MD
    http://denversdietdoctor.com

  60. Anonymous says:

    Longevity, wellness, prevention and treatment through lifestyle modification including diet, weight loss and exercise. Teaching patients how to make better food choices based on carbohydrate content, glycemic index, low carb and Paleo diet. Family Medicine, Family Practice, Family Doctor and Occupational Medicine. Board certified physician, Dr. Gerber, Jeffry N. Gerber, M.D., Denver’s Diet Doctor, is located in Littleton

    Jeffry N. Gerber, MD
    http://denversdietdoctor.com

  61. Anonymous says:

    Longevity, wellness, prevention and treatment through lifestyle modification including diet, weight loss and exercise. Teaching patients how to make better food choices based on carbohydrate content, glycemic index, low carb and Paleo diet. Family Medicine, Family Practice, Family Doctor and Occupational Medicine. Board certified physician, Dr. Gerber, Jeffry N. Gerber, M.D., Denver’s Diet Doctor, is located in Littleton

    Jeffry N. Gerber, MD
    http://denversdietdoctor.com

  62. Karl Schmidt says:

    Actually, I think Gary was correct in what he said – a cholesterol test is pretty worthless (unless you have a E3 genetic problem). The one they should be using is the oxLDL test – like the triple marker available from Shiel Medical Laboratory. IMO, it is only oxLDL that causes the immune response and cascade that causes coronary Artery Disease.

  63. Imani says:

    Thank you for publishing your results. I was so mad when I saw you on Dr. Oz because of the way he treated you and distorted what you were saying. Now you have the only kind of proof that they seem to understand.

  64. Philip Lee says:

    The recent AHA statement on triglycerides recommends that they be reduced by, among other recommendations, limiting carbohydrates to 50 – 50 percent of caloric intake, “added” ( Poured on top rather than mixed in?) sugar <10 percent, and saturated fat <7 percent. I do not think GT is following the program!

  65. I think that you are right about dietary fat, but you may be wrong about hormone replacement therapy. Others may also be wrong about sunscreen.

    As you have pointed out, when looking at a preventative health practice you need to look at total mortality from all causes, not just the effect of the preventative practice on an individual disease.

    If you will look at the chart on page 64 of the hardback version of “Hot Flashes, Hormones & Your Health” by Dr. JoAnn Manson you will see that women in their fifties who took hormone replacement therapy had lower total mortality from all causes combined. In other words, for women in their fifties hormone replacement therapy reduced their chance of dying.

    A similar approach with the use of sunscreen would be to look not just at the effect of its use on skin cancer incidence but rather its effect on total mortality from all causes combined. As you probably know, one of the side effects of sunscreen is that it reduces vitamin D absorption and vitamin D is a powerful anti-carcinogen.

  66. Razz Putin says:

    That’s a riot! I didn’t know that Taubes had chickened out publicly on Oz’s show. Anybody would see that refusal as necessarily detracting from credibility, except for the truly blind-followers. That’d be like somebody being asked to take a drug test, but they refuse and come back with a test weeks later.

    Did he fast for days or weeks and then take the test? That’s make his numbers look good. Of course, if they weren’t good then I bet he never would have showed them. No matter now much Gary claims that the numbers don’t matter (and he might possibly be right), even so a large portion of the population (aka customers for Gary) would have been scared off.

    As far as speculation about why he didn’t foresee being asked by Oz? I think it’s simple: Gary is very far from being the world’s greatest genius that his followers claim him to be. I bet he does have a good memory, and probably is an obsessive organizer. But aside from that, I doubt that he has any true understanding of things. After all, he did write his whole ‘epic tome’ but apparently had no idea that proteins can provoke insulin secretion. That’s just one of his epic flaws.

    IIRC, if you were to check Eades’ site, you’d find Eades saying that Oz secretly believed in Gary’s ideas, but that Oz couldn’t say so because Oz’s viewers weren’t ready for that big switch. Hehe… so Gary maybe thought he was heading into another Gary-Taubes-lovefest, like he usually gets.

    Well, in the end we know that somebody submitted some blood sample that had Taubes’ name on it. He could have removed all doubt, though, by simply not chickening out with Oz. Cluck, cluck, Gary. Your numbers might have even been good, but now you are suspect.

    Then again, Atkins’ heir could have released his hospital records to remove doubt, too.

    Btw, why does the world’s greatest genius call it a ‘prescription’? It’s an ‘order’. A prescription is for a drug, or for some device(s), such as syringes, e.g.

    Hey, should this blog be subtitled, “The Emperor’s New Clothes” :)

    • DracilC says:

      Cute, but I give this a 3/10. The Birthers have already done this shtick.

    • Jean-Luc says:

      You’re just as funny as those guys that think the moon landing was faked.

      • Razwell says:

        I agree Jean. :)

        Those fake moon landing people obviously are very unaware that the ” paper trail” is public record. Anyone who bothered to look this up would know no one would go to all that trouble and detail to fake a landing.

        The paper trail simply debunks all moon myths. More examples of the loons who abound on the Internet.

        Take care,

        Raz

    • Your postulating might be a little more credible if Gary were the only one with great blood lipids. But many more of us are getting similar results.
      http://www.carboholicsanonymous.com

    • Anonymous says:

      Idiot. Fasting won’t suddenly lower triglycerides or HDL/LDL ratio.

    • Razwell says:

      If the public had been more educated on the cholesterol/coronary artery disease literature , I would bet Gary would have done it.

      However, Gary knowns and understand many people are not educated and a potential elevated result ( as can happen to anybody regardless of diet) would or might scare off people.

      My own lab work is very similar to Gary’s. My HDL is 68 and total cholesterol is 187 mg/dl. My LDL is anywhere from 70 to 127 mg/dl. This varies by season. Winter it is more. Summer it is less.

      No one is omniscient on the subject of obesity or athersclerosis Razz Putin. To do so would REQUIRE A COMPLETE UNDERSTANING OF HUMAN CELLULAR METABOLISM. Science does not currently understand cellular metabolism – ONLY BITS AND FRAGMENTS.

      You are the one being a fraud here. Genuine science always admits uncertainty and unknowns.

    • I sense the presence of an unpublished and professionally jealous “writer”  
      Eating low carb also makes people less cranky and improves their sex life too!  cheers!

  67. Jobert says:

    Just wanted to add my blood test results to your page here. I also have switched in the last 12 months toward eating very little processed food, and lots of saturated fat in the form of eggs, butter, whole milk, whole milk yogurt & cheese, etc. I do still eat carbs in the form of whole wheat pastas maybe once a week, and my own homemade wheat bread made from wheat berries I grind myself. Very fresh and minimally processed.

    Anyway, my cholesterol totals came back great. I’m 33 years old.
    195 total cholesterol
    121 LDL
    63 HDL

    I have always been thin no matter what I eat, but I find that eating this type of diet makes me have the most energy. If I don’t have my pastured egg in the morning, I get hungry by lunch time and start to feel my blood sugar levels drop.

    It’s going to be very, very difficult for me to reduce the amount of sugar I consume. While I don’t eat packaged meals anymore, I do have a sweet tooth for candy now and then. I’m going to have to start picturing the poison control center frown face sticker when I see candy.

  68. Your diet is almost identical to mine. My blood profiles are very similar, although my HDL tends to run between 90 and 110.
    My son works for Whole Foods and was really excited about getting his “biometrics” measured to qualify him for a larger discount. He is also a low-carber (age 22 and convinced that his “ADHD” that nearly wrecked his life was due to his high-carb diet as a kid). His numbers came back in the “gold star” categories for almost everything, except that his LDL was 113 (very similar to yours). That was enough to preclude him from getting even a small increase in his employee discount. He is really bummed about this. I really wish the public would get over the “total cholesterol” and “high LDL” fallacies. I am pretty sure Whole Foods did not differentiate between the types of LDL. I suspect my son has the light, fluffy LDL with his very healthy, low carb, organic diet. Well, maybe your wonderful work Gary, will finally lead to a revolution in the understanding of insulin and human metabolism and the real causes of heart disease.
    I LOVE your articles and books and have followed your work for ten years. In my family, you are a HERO!

  69. Jean-Luc says:

    Oz and his unquestioning ilk will just exclaim, “Total cholesterol of 204?! YOU NEED STATINS!”

  70. Anonymous says:

    Gary, pretty impressive numbers. You are a lucky man and I agree it’s not the totals as much as the breakdown of lipids and your lipid subfractions are beautiful. Good genes, Good environment or both. Congrats. Mike C. MD

  71. Gary, you didn’t have to do this.

  72. Anonymous says:

    As a born-again low-carber and even crusader (pitty my poor relatives and colleagues), I am thrilled to see GT post his lipids (kudos to his wife for her communication instincts). But alas, I cannot share in everyone’s enthusiasm for red meat. I eat eggs and whole-fat dairy and butter and olive oil and coconut oil. I eat chicken skin and fatty chicken sausages. But I keep running across new (post-GCBC) studies showing a relationship between red meat consumption and cancer. Ajit Varki at UC San Diego has done some really intriguing work on the sialic acid neu5Gc that suggests a mechanism (inflammation, immune system stuff; nothing to do with satfat) through which red meat might cause cancer. I am really curious to see some discussion about this from GT or any other of you knowledgeable folks in the low-carb community.

    • Anonymous says:

      I don’t pretend to be an expert, but what I do know leads me to suspect that, if there is a problem with red meat, it is red meat that is raised on corn and/or soy feed–i.e. industrially raised, found in supermarkets everywhere, beef. I would seriously doubt that consuming grass fed beef would lead to cancer, particularly since the fat in grass fed beef has a great lipid profile and is high in CLA. CLA (Conjugated Linoleic Acid) from natural sources (not supplements) may actually provide some measure of protection from cancer–at least according to some studies. I won’t eat red meat out, but do fix and eat it at home. I purchase only the grass fed variety.

    • Anonymous says:

      I believe the studies that show a relationship between red meat consumption and cancer include processed meats in the “red meat” category. Crazy, no?

      • montmorency says:

        Crazy, yes. Another factor is how fatty the red meat is or how much fat is eaten with it. (Barry Groves suggests this may be a factor).  I wonder if the fat content of the meat is ever taken into account in these studies?

  73. Anonymous says:

    It is so awesome that you are blogging now! You rock Taubes!

  74. Great VAP, you must have a great family history as well. Please share with your readers that they can learn more about the VAP cholesterol test, and see other patient cases, at my blog: http://www.cobblescorner.com.

    Mike Cobble, M.D.

    • Gary’s readings do not necessarily mean he has a great family history. My daily diet is nearly a carbon copy of what Gary purports to eat. I have been eating that way for 11 years. My lab results are similar to his, except that my HDL tends to run between 89 and 110. My family history is terrible, including a grandfather, father, sister and aunt (on different sides of the family) with so-called Type II Diabetes, a grandmother who had her first of several heart attacks at an early age and whose mother, sister, and brother died of strokes in their 40′s. My mother has been taking blood pressure meds since I can remember. So, I attribute my great health to my decision 11 years ago to abandon my 20 years of low-fat dieting that was taking a toll on my health and well-being, and follow a low-carb lifestyle that made sense when I read and understood the science of insulin and human metabolism.

      • Anonymous says:

        What do you mean by so-called Type II Diabetes? I’ve been diagnosed, three of my mother’s siblings were. Low carb (no sugar, little starch in green veg) will keep my glucose at an acceptable level.

        • What I mean by “so-called Type II Diabetes” is that I do not acknowledge chronic high blood sugar to be a “disease.” There is so much misunderstanding caused by calling high blood sugar from excessive carb consumption in a person with insulin-resistance “diabetes” and allowing it to become a medical condition that is then treated with pharmaceuticals and insulin injections that I don’t know where to start.
          High blood sugar in people with a functioning pancreas must be differentiated from the very different condition “Type I Diabetes” in which the pancreas no longer produces insulin and requires intense medical monitoring and treatment.
          High blood sugar in those of us with insulin-resistance is a symptom, not a disease. It cannot be cured, but can be managed with diet and other lifestyle changes. No medications needed (they cause more harm than good) and prescribing insulin injections should be considered malpractice.
          All that said, I was well on my way to being another “diabetic” until I discovered the writings of Atkins, Eades, and Gary Taubes, among others who explained the science behind insulin-resistance. My father died of congestive heart disease and was nearly blind from retinopathy 15 years after his diagnosis with “Type II Diabetes.” His father was also “diabetic” and died a month after a leg amputation. My mother’s sister had serious high blood pressure as early as her 20′s, struggled with her weight, and died in her early 60′s with breast cancer and “diabetes.” (She made many, many trips to the Mayo Clinic, and they apparently were not able to help her) Having seen these loved ones suffer horribly in spite of their medical treatment for “diabetes,” I am convinced that proper diet was all that was needed to prevent those tragedies. I am on a campaign to end this travesty, and my first step is to call this condition what it really is and let people know that there is a simple and effective way to manage it.
          I am convinced that I was on the same road to the horrors of “diabetes” had I not reversed the trend with my change to a low-carb diet 11 years ago. My brother has had the same result. My sister has not been as fortunate, I think because she continues to see a doctor and take a lot of medications and her high blood sugar had progressed quite far before she started cutting her carb intake. (I think she still eats to little fat and maybe too much protein and carbs for her severe resistance) So that’s my personal experience and why I am so adamant about low-carb dieting for people like me and my family and so angry at the medical profession. (BTW – my ex-husband was a general internist who preached low-fat, low-fat, low-fat. My son had severe ADHD and my daughter was a morbidly obese teenager. Happily, they are both now low-carbers and happy and healthy; their father, sadly had terrible health and even some cognitive impairment – my kids say they are worried about how much sugar he eats; his grandfather also died after a leg amputation from “diabetes” and he was always adamant that if we ate low-fat we wouldn’t get fat and get diabetes; my kids say he suspects he may be borderline “diabetic.” Sigh).
          Are you sorry you asked?

        • What I mean by “so-called Type II Diabetes” is that I do not acknowledge chronic high blood sugar to be a “disease.” There is so much misunderstanding caused by calling high blood sugar from excessive carb consumption in a person with insulin-resistance “diabetes” and allowing it to become a medical condition that is then treated with pharmaceuticals and insulin injections that I don’t know where to start.
          High blood sugar in people with a functioning pancreas must be differentiated from the very different condition “Type I Diabetes” in which the pancreas no longer produces insulin and requires intense medical monitoring and treatment.
          High blood sugar in those of us with insulin-resistance is a symptom, not a disease. It cannot be cured, but can be managed with diet and other lifestyle changes. No medications needed (they cause more harm than good) and prescribing insulin injections should be considered malpractice.
          All that said, I was well on my way to being another “diabetic” until I discovered the writings of Atkins, Eades, and Gary Taubes, among others who explained the science behind insulin-resistance. My father died of congestive heart disease and was nearly blind from retinopathy 15 years after his diagnosis with “Type II Diabetes.” His father was also “diabetic” and died a month after a leg amputation. My mother’s sister had serious high blood pressure as early as her 20′s, struggled with her weight, and died in her early 60′s with breast cancer and “diabetes.” (She made many, many trips to the Mayo Clinic, and they apparently were not able to help her) Having seen these loved ones suffer horribly in spite of their medical treatment for “diabetes,” I am convinced that proper diet was all that was needed to prevent those tragedies. I am on a campaign to end this travesty, and my first step is to call this condition what it really is and let people know that there is a simple and effective way to manage it.
          I am convinced that I was on the same road to the horrors of “diabetes” had I not reversed the trend with my change to a low-carb diet 11 years ago. My brother has had the same result. My sister has not been as fortunate, I think because she continues to see a doctor and take a lot of medications and her high blood sugar had progressed quite far before she started cutting her carb intake. (I think she still eats to little fat and maybe too much protein and carbs for her severe resistance) So that’s my personal experience and why I am so adamant about low-carb dieting for people like me and my family and so angry at the medical profession. (BTW – my ex-husband was a general internist who preached low-fat, low-fat, low-fat. My son had severe ADHD and my daughter was a morbidly obese teenager. Happily, they are both now low-carbers and happy and healthy; their father, sadly had terrible health and even some cognitive impairment – my kids say they are worried about how much sugar he eats; his grandfather also died after a leg amputation from “diabetes” and he was always adamant that if we ate low-fat we wouldn’t get fat and get diabetes; my kids say he suspects he may be borderline “diabetic.” Sigh).
          Are you sorry you asked?

          • Anonymous says:

            Thanks for your response. I’m not sorry I asked, at all. You confirm what I’ve thought — where is this diabetes disease in my now defective (since diagnosis) body — and how can it disappear if I don’t consume sugar or starch, just protein and mostly green veg and whatever saturated fat comes with the protein. I understand I am what might be called sugar sensitive after a lifelong sugar addiction (but why am I addicted to sugar and others are not? why are all of my family on both sides heavy sugar/starch and alcohol consumers?). I explained for years to doctors that my mother’s two sisters were diabetic but I wasn’t tested till my mother’s brother had part of his leg amputated for poor circulation and diabetes II, then I was at 12 HbAic — now I am at 6 with low carb — and doctors still tell me how dangerous the low carb diet is! I was lucky that the doctor at diagnosis did not suggest drugs (because she certainly did for everything else) but losing the sudden weight gain, then she worried I might be anorexic because the weight fell off on Dr. Richard K. Berstein’s low carb diet. My husband and I had a laugh at me being anorexic — not if a chocolate bar is in sight! My husband thinks meat is good and is glad all the information provided validates that saturated fat is good. I still don’t get the idea of insulin “resistance” — I seem to be resistant to many things — is that some other “disease”? And why don’t people try a glucose meter to see their body’s reaction to various foods? Maybe you have to get sick enough and realize the orthodox medical profession provides only drugs and surgery and look elsewhere.

          • Anonymous says:

            Thanks for your response. I’m not sorry I asked, at all. You confirm what I’ve thought — where is this diabetes disease in my now defective (since diagnosis) body — and how can it disappear if I don’t consume sugar or starch, just protein and mostly green veg and whatever saturated fat comes with the protein. I understand I am what might be called sugar sensitive after a lifelong sugar addiction (but why am I addicted to sugar and others are not? why are all of my family on both sides heavy sugar/starch and alcohol consumers?). I explained for years to doctors that my mother’s two sisters were diabetic but I wasn’t tested till my mother’s brother had part of his leg amputated for poor circulation and diabetes II, then I was at 12 HbAic — now I am at 6 with low carb — and doctors still tell me how dangerous the low carb diet is! I was lucky that the doctor at diagnosis did not suggest drugs (because she certainly did for everything else) but losing the sudden weight gain, then she worried I might be anorexic because the weight fell off on Dr. Richard K. Berstein’s low carb diet. My husband and I had a laugh at me being anorexic — not if a chocolate bar is in sight! My husband thinks meat is good and is glad all the information provided validates that saturated fat is good. I still don’t get the idea of insulin “resistance” — I seem to be resistant to many things — is that some other “disease”? And why don’t people try a glucose meter to see their body’s reaction to various foods? Maybe you have to get sick enough and realize the orthodox medical profession provides only drugs and surgery and look elsewhere.

          • Hello dlmc… A good place to start is by watching Tom Naughton’s FatHead movie.. free on HULU or YouTube (I think).  I have just finished reading Gary Taubes’ book Why We Get Fat (excellent!) and have just started Good Calories, Bad Calories.  Of course there is always Atkins.. a good cover to cover read as well. You are clearly craving more information… beats craving candy any day!  I am more than 100 lbs lighter because of low carb eating!  I forget about eating for 5-6 hours at a time…. that alone feels like magic.

  75. Wooohooo thanks so much for doing this Gary. When my husband triglycerides were through the roof–he’s a typical meat, bread and potatoes Brit, heavy on the bread and potatoes, I suggested he switch to eggs for breakfast vs toast or sweetened yogurt shots, delete the bread on his lunch sandwich and eat plenty of meat or fish with no potatoes at dinner. In 3 months his numbers were in a healthy range.
    Your article in the Times is exceptional as always Gary.

  76. Wende Mate says:

    GT,

    Your blood test results are not dissimilar to those I received about 7 years ago after following a similar diet, which I adopted after reading “What If It’s All Been a Big Fat Lie?.” Because my total cholesterol numbers were up, my doctor advised me to stop the diet. After explaining to me that “calories in – calories out” was the ONLY way to explain my weight loss (regardless of what I told him I was eating), he finally convinced me that I was on was dangerous path and I went back to eating a diet based on the USDA pyramid… with the eventual result of gaining back every pound I had lost.

    Reading Why We Get Fat gave me the confidence to go back to the diet that my gut knew was the right one for me. The only problem is that it is no longer working very well. When I starting eating low carb/high fat again, I initially lost 15 lbs, but have not been able to lose any more weight for almost three months now. The major difference is that I am now menopausal. As such, the sections about LPL in WWGF were of great interest to me, but there was no clear recommendation as to what to do about it. So my question now is:

    Can LPL levels be tested, and is there a way to reconcile changes in LPL to this way of eating?

    I have searched the internet for information regarding menopause and a low carb/high fat lifestyle, but cannot find anything that seems credible. Some information indicates that HRTs cause weight gain, others say that HRTs prevent weight gain. Most of the information I have found seems to be more anecdotal rather than based on any actual studies.

    I imagine there must be other women who are struggling with this as well, so if you can lead me to any credible information about effectively losing weight during menopause while eating low carb/high fat, I would appreciate it more than you know.

    Many thanks,
    WM

    • Anonymous says:

      Hi Wende — I’ve been eating meat, fat and eggs for years! and my #’s were always low but early in menopause the total went up to 200 or so, the HDL higher than the LDL at about 100. For a variety of reasons, I became convinced that taking bio-identical hormones would improve my health (strong family history of breast cancer, also some heart disease and colon cancer) and once on the bio-identical (NOT conventional) HRT, my total cholesterol fell to 160 and the balance stayed about the same… I recommend bio-identical HRT to all my patients as a means to improve their health! (See Holtorf’s article in Postgraduate Medicine, January 2009?)

      A week or so before the great NYTMagazine piece on sugar, the NYT had an unfortunately incomplete critique of conventional HRT, lacking any information on bio-identical.

      The estrogen component should function as an anti-insulin (WWGF) and the progesterone kept to a low normal amount so it doesn’t cause weight gain.

      You’ll need to check with a doc near you specializing in bio-identicals.

  77. David says:

    Hi Gary,
    Do you know of the research that shows that the Friedwald equation, which is used to calculate LDL, is inaccurate and overestimates LDL numbers when triglycerides are very low? You had the expensive direct measurement, but most people on low-carb diets are getting inaccurate estimates.
    http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/06/ldl-calculator.html

  78. David says:

    Hi Gary,
    Do you know of the research that shows that the Friedwald equation, which is used to calculate LDL, is inaccurate and overestimates LDL numbers when triglycerides are very low? You had the expensive direct measurement, but most people on low-carb diets are getting inaccurate estimates.
    http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/06/ldl-calculator.html

  79. Fouad Kassab says:

    Hi Gary. I’ve read your fantastic book yesterday. I’ll certainly be reading it a couple of more times to make sure I understand it all, and that I haven’t missed anything. I totally understand the insulin connection in the storage of fat and it explains a lot of things about my weight and health. A question that I don’t have an answer for is, if we’re eating mainly protein and fat (let’s say we’ve eliminated carbs), how come we can eat as much as we want (knowing that many of us tend to over eat)? What happens to the excess amount of food/calories (I know you hate thinking about calories)? Does our body burn/use the energy provided to us in form of fat and protein completely, despite it being provided an excess? Thank you. The insight you’ve given me is just amazing.

    • Anonymous says:

      Since Gary can’t reply to every question: The tendency to overeat is caused by what we eat. Appetite becomes less once you are low carb. According to Dr. Mike Eades (who along with his wife Dr. Mary Dan Eades authored Protien Power and Protein Power Life Plan) falling blood sugar (even if it is too high) is interpreted by the body as hunger. In addition to both being MD’s they both explain the science well and each as a website with many blog posts. You might find answers there.

  80. Anonymous says:

    Im a little confused, can we eat legumes and pulses?

  81. Anonymous says:

    Im a little confused, can we eat legumes and pulses?

  82. joana says:

    Hi Gary,
    Your books are great! Just what I needed to change my diet: science, good science.
    I’m just wondering what is the diet of your kids. I have an almost 2-year-old son and I keep him on a low carb diet as much as I can convince my husband. Would love to read a blog post about this.
    Thanks!

  83. joana says:

    Hi Gary,
    Love your books, just what I needed to change my diet: science, and good science when possible!
    I wanted to know your kids’ diet. I too have a toddler and try to feed him low carb and high fat as much as I can convince my husband. Would love to read a post on this.
    Thanks!

  84. I’m new to this and maybe others can shed some light for me. I have not ordered Gary’s books yet and I think I will be purchasing GC/BC very soon.

    Anyhow, I went grain-free two months ago. Eating all natural, nothing processed, etc. I have had a return of thyroid symptoms. This is not fun and I need to find out if this is a rebound reaction that will correct itself. My thyroid labs are low while taking 4 1/2 grains desiccated thyroid. I’m hesitant to increase my dose if resistance is the problem. Right now I have swollen tongue, hair falling out, and sleeping half the day. I can’t even work right now. Does anyone have any suggestions?

    After two months grain free, my HDL has gone up 2 points, LDL down 2 points, and triglycerides up over 100 points. I think the triglycerides are up due to the low thyroid function.

    My other question is if the progress with cholesterol numbers will continue to progress over time or do you get to the point (maybe 6 months in) where that’s the best they’ll be?

    Thank you for any input.

    Gary, I printed out your blog post for my doctor. He was intrigued and VERY interested!

    • Anonymous says:

      I would think the low-carb hypothesis applies only if you’re alright hormonally speaking.

      • Thank you, Arrow. I will “google” the low-carb hypothesis for more information. I am eating vegetables and figured I was getting enough carbs that way. Maybe not.

        Also, had several other hormone tests done and will have those results next week. Very well could be something there.

      • My tests included estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, and DHEA. Do you know if I got them all covered? I’m expecting low progesterone because I’ve read that low thyroid will cause low progesterone. I didn’t know it could be the other way around.

    • I wanted to update this thread as my Free T3 came back upper end of range. What the heck?!! Ok, so no conversion problem from the diet. yay!!! So…. resistance problem… I think I have it traced to my ferritin level which has dropped. Time will tell. In any case, I no longer think the problem was the diet.

      You know, the doctor had run my Total T3 which was mid-range. The last time my Total T3 was mid-range, my Free T3 was low. So, I assumed that my Free T3 would be low. How wrong I was!

  85. ROBERT says:

    I was disappointed in my recent numbers:

    Total- 291
    HDL- 90
    LDL- 186
    TRIG- 73
    RATIO- 3.2
    CRP- 7.7 (this one really bothers me)

    I had been eating a lot of tomatoes, plus weekend boozing for about two years. Why are my numbers so high? I eat paleo, btw.

    • Anonymous says:

      How is your thyroid? Do you exercise? How consistent is your paleo-diet?

    • Robert, do you have the breakdown for the LDL? Small or Large, Pattern A or Pattern B? My thoughts are that with your HDL/TRIG ratio, you most likely have Large buoyant LDL, which are neutral. I personally would be very happy with that cholesterol profile. Although, I am a newbie and not nearly as informed as others here. Perhaps others will comment as well. I can’t comment on CRP because I have yet to learn about that. Good luck to you.

    • Anonymous says:

      Booze = carbohydrates!

  86. Razwell says:

    Awesome article, Gary. I linked it to my own blog. I want to get the word out. Interstingly, my own HDL is exactly 68. :)

  87. Razwell says:

    I also wanted to say that for all the outspoken critics of Gary Taubes and Robert Lustig, Science Daily shows the research demonstrating fructose is NOT a good thing.

    Google “Science Daily limiting fructose might boost weight loss’ and “Science Daily Why is fructose so fattening ?”.

    It’s his critics who are wrong. Genuine science is demonstrating fructose to be not your friend as far as obesity, and cancer , as well as liver health.

    Gary Taubes and Dr. Robert Lustig ‘s assertions of the harmful effects of fructose are backed by genuine science.

  88. That is very interesting. I wish there were a way that my son could let the “powers that be” at Whole Foods know about this and have them re-evaluate his biometrics. His triglycerides were 50 and LDL 113. Because his LDL was considered high, they refused to give him the increased store discount they use as a “reward” for being healthy.

  89. Gary, if you read this, please, please write a rebuttal. This article is a perfect example of the sort of poor science you have made you career exposing. I’d like to see all of the articulate, intelligent low-carb supporters on this blog go straight to Huffingpost and expose this article for the “hooey” it is.
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tim-harlan-md/lowcarb-diets-linked-with_b_851506.html

  90. Nicola Moxey says:

    Out of interest, is there anything in that panel that might lead you to change anything in your lifestyle/diet?

    • montmorency says:

       Nicola,

      I’m in the UK as well. I went to an “online doctor” firm called E-Med, who can prescribe/order a test to your specification from a lab they use. They have a brochure of tests you can pick from. It’s a bit like online shopping :-)   It meant a trip into London, to pick up the prescription/order and then go on to the clinic to have the blood test, but that wasn’t a problem for me.

      It cost an arm an a leg – pay to join E-Med, pay for the prescription, and pay for the test, but I considered it worth it. Not something I can afford to have done very often though although I might have a less extensive test done next time. I’ve posted elsewhere about my concerns with HbA1c. You can have that done on the NHS, but you can’t exactly go your GP and demand it. And if you did, you would be more or less obliged to accept any drugs he insisted on, or probably get struck off his patient list and/or being put on the “awkward squad” list. I don’t go near my doctor. I just know that I would be statinated, and there is no way I’m going to let that happen.

      Actually, E-Med said they would copy my results to my GP unless I objected. I thought about this and then decided not to object. (After all, what could he actually do? Bring me in with a SWAT team?). But it’s been two years now, and I’ve never heard from my GP’s surgery about it. Perhaps E-Med forgot to send it, or more likely the surgery (large group practice) were too busy to be bothered about it.

      Not directly-related note: I ordered a copy of the US paperback version (it’s better than the British paperback) of GC, BC and had amazon send it directly to them, with a brief covering note of the type that amazon allows with gifts. I had meant to make it anonymous (I didn’t want to draw their attention to me), but my name must have been in there somewhere, and I got a communication of surprised but polite thanks from the practice manager :-) Of course, there is no guarantee that anyone there has read it.

      Regards,
      Mike

  91. Razwell says:

    The Cochrane Collaboration came out with an extensive review of the science and said there is very little evidence that statins benefit those with no history of coronary artery disease and at low risk. I am happy more people are being exposed to the contradictory evidence to the lipid hypothesis. Much more mainstream now.

    On a side note, in those who have heart disease, statins’ mechanisms of action are most likely their 11 pleotropic effects, not cholesterol reduction.

  92. Joe says:

    I enjoyed GC/BC immensely when I read it.

    However, some critics might look at the total cholesterol number and think it is too high. The “healthy” number I used to hear was 180. Now, sometimes it is 200 and the reference number on the test results gives a healthy range as “< 200". I don't know if Drs. Oz or Ornish would have expected to see something like 250???

  93. Anonymous says:

    Thank you so much for your post. I have a question for you. How do you reconcile the fact that cows are very polluting? I espouse your work (read everything), but I am still having a hard time dealing with the fact that cows pollute.
    Julie (I am a registered dietitian and nutritionist by the way!)

    • The pesticides and chemical fertilizers that plants require in order to feed 6 billion people on this earth, pollute the earth at an even greater ratio than that of cows and other livestock and poultry.

      • Anonymous says:

        As far as the fruits and vegetables we eat, I encourage all my clients to eat organically grown produce. However, the pesticides and chemical fertilizers used on the crops grown to feed the livestock and poultry is part of the pollution problem I am talking about. Plus the run off into the rivers, many of which lead to the Gulf of Mexico, and the algae blooms forming as a result which are killing the food that the fish there eat. There is plenty of research on the negative effects.
        I am not discounting GT’s diet, I am just questioning how this world would survive if everyone ate that much meat. I also wonder if the same health results could be attained from a low caloric, vegetable-based diet, without grains, starches or sugar, and supplemented with protein. I also think that there are so many genetic differences, that perhaps some would do well with one approach, and others with a different one? I know plenty of extremely healthy people who eat mostly vegetables, and there are many cultures or isolated groups that have eaten this way and suffer very little disease, such as the monks at Mount Athos in Greece.
        I would guess the real answer is to stop having so many babies.

        • Those organic fruits and vegetables your encouraging your clients to eat are all hybrids, hybrid to increase their sugar content. Usually heirloom hybrids. Combine this with the abundant availability of all fruits and vegetables and the fact that we all become addicted to these massive amounts of sugar that nature never intended, and you are looking at the huge dilemma that we all face in our world of health as well as psyche. — Sugars in these massive amounts become “stimulant drugs” not unlike cocaine and speed and effect our minds and bodies and lives, dramatically.

          • Anonymous says:

            If I am recommending hybrid kale that has a higher sugar content, then it is minute. I hardly fear that. And, if we are talking about hybrid, so are all the cows in this country. I have never seen anyone get addicted to vegetables, and if they just ate a lot, their health markers were beautiful.
            Besides, this is not my question. And I addressed it to Gary Taubes.

        • Exactly! The problem is that there are too many people on the planet to allow us to eat both how we should and in a sustainable way. It’s the double-edged sword of agriculture: it allowed for an incredible increase in population but at the same time ruined our health.

        • Galia L. says:

          Mostly, people who have problem with weight, eat too much of everything because they are too hungry on their diet of carbohydrates , proteins and fats. If you remove most of the carbs from their diet, they would loose their hunger and eat less amount of food less often. People who eat grains eat too much food overall most of the time.They eat 5 – 6 times a day.It is not necessary to eat too much meat on LC diet. I eat 2 times a day on my diet, and now buy less groceries and generate less garbage. Production of grains does not do out planet any good as well.

    • Of course a huge pollution problem from intensive beef production is the lakes of fecal matter… the other is the methane. But perhaps if cows were fed their natural diet – grass – rather than soy and corn and other grains, they wouldn’t be in such dire digestive distress and the methane problem would resolve. As to the lakes of fecal matter… was this a problem when herds of millions of bisons lived on the prairies?

  94. Randy says:

    Gary – My results are just in as well. It was funny – I had to tell the doctor what tests I wanted ran in order to get the right ones done. They commented that they had not seen any this in-depth for a normal physical. My numbers are almost identical to yours – I have been primal/paleo for about 6 months now – hardcore and strict. I eat lots of meat and eggs as my normal daily intake with little to no carbs on many days – lost my taste for most of it. No grains and no starches or sugars ever!

    The big difference in my numbers were my Vitamin D 25 Hydroxy – My number was 126 – that is right 126. I had a really low number a year ago – 24. I have been taking 8,000 iu gel caps (over the counter daily for over 6 months). I am now cutting back to 1,000 iu’s to see how they level in 3 months. My doctor was not overly concerned just said I should cut back for 3 months to see where it levels at.

    I am a 54 y/o male and very active. I have never felt this good in over 25 years!!! I am 6′ 2″ and 190 pounds now – down from 235 pounds. My Body Fat with calipers is right at 11% now…. :) My doctor was so surprised from the results considering what they were a year ago. He actually took notes to my diet and exercise as well as the reference materials I was using which includes your books.

    Bottomline – I am fully on board and sold out! It was funny – I really did not need the lab tests to tell me how I felt or was doing. I can see it in the mirror and feel it with how my body is behaving. I feel wonderful!!! Thank you for your incredible work in this area and for telling those that will list

  95. Let’s see if Dr. Oz will post his blood test results online

    Re-Tweet this post with @DrOz and #DrOz in the tweet

    Sample Tweet: @DrOz – @GaryTaubes posted his cholesterol test online – Are you willing to do the same? – http://t.co/OgmsIhH – #DrOz #health #lowcarb

  96. TC Knight says:

    Great post, Gary! Back in the ’70s (I’m 59), I got rid of a lot of bodyfat by simply eating all I wanted of meat, cheese, and eggs, along with a small salad every once in a while. I’m low-carbing again, but I include a lot more veggies than I did back then, though I hate ‘em and would prefer to just use a freeze-dried low-carb (high ORAC) fruit/veggie powder. What does your veggie intake look like? Do you use a supplement like Greens+ or Superfood (Biotest)? Also, have you ever figured your calorie intake?

  97. Anonymous says:

    Many years ago a doctor used my lipid test results to push me in the direction of a “cholesterol-reducing” diet away from my Atkins-inspired (and very successful) regime. My health suffered. I started to apply the same scepticism that drove me to Atkins to the question of the cholesterol theory of heart disease.

    The quality of science I found was comparable but not quite as bad as that applied to diet. But I found Taubes-like work by Uffe Ravnskov, Malcolm Kendrick, T.J. Moore et al. I no longer bother with lipid panels (or doctors).

    Once upon a time doctors examined the excreta of their patients. The advent of the thermometer and blood pressure devices shifted the focus to these simple tests. Now we religiously test blood as the arbiter of health.

    None of these tests amount to much but they do drive “treatments” which often do more harm than good.

    To everybody over-analyzing their blood test results – read Ravnskov.

    • montmorency says:

      Excellent points. As Gary pointed out in GCBC, the basic cholesterol test became popular, among other reasons, because it was relatively simple to do. Even when the science advanced, the more sophisticated tests could only be done in a few labs and would have been expensive. 

      Until the advent of antibiotics, about the only thing the average general practitioner had to offer was bedside manner (not to be under-estimated though, for its placebo effect). Their only bit of practical science was the thermometer and the sphygmomanometer.

      Antibiotics finally gave them a magic bullet and they became prescription-happy. (The problems with over-use of antibiotics took a generation or so to emerge).

      Anti-depressants were another magic-bullet, finally something to keep the bored housewives out of his hair.[I'm over-simplifying for effect and using irony here :-) ]

      And when statins came along, at last a magic bullet for heart problems. Prescription pads had to be ordered in bulk and the result is a billion-dollar pharmaceuticals industry.

      Go to a doctor and by and large he will prescribe because that is what doctors do. Patients came to expect it and even demanded prescriptions when the doctor was reluctant to comply (especially in Britain where NHS patients rarely paid the full cost of the treatment).

      Doctors do what they always do and what is expected of them, not what is actually in the bests interests of the patient.

      I don’t doubt there are honourable exceptions, as there always have been.

  98. Anonymous says:

    So help me out with this Science Daily piece. As summarized by science daily, the results seem to be saying that saturated fat is bad because it prevents the body from clearing sugar, and the effect is worse when combined with caffeine. But if I’m following (and maybe I’m not getting it), you could equally interpret the results as meaning–if you are going to eat a fatty diet and drink coffee (which may not be harmful in themselves or together), for pete’s sake don’t also consume sugar. In short, why is fat and/or coffee the villain of the piece and not sugar. What am I missing?

    All that said–is it news that fat, sugar and caffeine together are uniquely bad? Here’s the article:

    Got a Craving for Fast Food? Skip the Coffee, Study Suggests

    ScienceDaily (Apr. 1, 2011) — Eating a fatty fast food meal is never good for you, but washing that meal down with a coffee is even worse, according to a new University of Guelph study.
    See Also:
    Health & Medicine

    * Diet and Weight Loss
    * Obesity
    * Cholesterol

    Plants & Animals

    * Food
    * Molecular Biology
    * Fisheries

    Reference

    * Blood sugar
    * South Beach diet
    * Saturated fat
    * Diabetic diet

    Researcher Marie-Soleil Beaudoin has discovered not only that a healthy person’s blood sugar levels spike after eating a high-fat meal, but that the spike doubles after having both a fatty meal and caffeinated coffee — jumping to levels similar to those of people at risk for diabetes.

    “The results tell us that saturated fat interferes with the body’s ability to clear sugars from the blood and, when combined with caffeinated coffee, the impact can be even worse,” said Beaudoin, a PhD student who conducted the study with U of G professors Lindsay Robinson and Terry Graham. “Having sugar remain in our blood for long periods is unhealthy because it can take a toll on our body’s organs.”

    Published in the Journal of Nutrition, the study is the first to examine the effects of saturated fat and caffeinated coffee on blood sugar levels using a novel fat cocktail which contains only lipids. This specially designed beverage allows researchers to accurately mimic what happens to the body when we ingest fat.

    For the study, healthy men drank about one gram of the fat beverage for every kilogram of body weight for their first meal. Six hours later, they were given a second meal consisting of a sugar drink.

    Typically when we ingest sugar, the body produces insulin, which takes the sugar out of the blood and distributes it to our muscles, said Beaudoin.

    But the researchers found that the fatty meal affected the body’s ability to clear the sugar out of the blood. The subjects’ blood sugar levels were 32 per cent higher than they were when the men had not ingested the fat cocktail.

    The researchers also tested the impact of caffeinated coffee combined with the fatty meal. For this test, participants received the equivalent of two cups of caffeinated coffee five hours after ingesting the fat beverage. An hour later, they were then given the sugar drink.

    The results showed blood sugar levels increased by 65 per cent compared to what they were when participants had not ingested the fat and caffeinated coffee.

    “This shows that the effects of a high-fat meal can last for hours,” said Beaudoin. “What you eat for lunch can impact how your body responds to food later in the day.”

    Besides testing the participant’s blood sugar levels, the researchers looked at gastro-intestinal effects by measuring incretin hormones released by the gut after ingesting the fat. These hormones signal the pancreas to release insulin to help clear the blood of sugar. The researchers discovered these hormones’ responses to carbohydrates are blunted after ingesting the fat beverage.

    “Ultimately we have found that fat and caffeinated coffee are impairing the communication between the gut and the pancreas, which could be playing a role in why participants couldn’t clear the sugar from their blood as easily,” said Beaudoin.

    The results of the study are particularly important for people at risk for metabolic diseases and Type 2 diabetes, she adds.

    “We have known for many years that people with or at risk of Type 2 diabetes should limit their caffeine intake. Drinking decaffeinated coffee instead of caffeinated is one way to improve one’s glucose tolerance. Limiting the intake of saturated fatty acids found in red meat, processed foods and fast food meals is also beneficial. This study has shown that the affects of these foods can be severe and long lasting.”

    • Anonymous says:

      This kind of article is truly “in the weeds”. Its head-spinningly difficult to study the low-level interactions within the human body. Our models of the operation of the body are hugely incomplete and essentially missing as far as I can work out. Here lies madness.

      Try reading Mary Enig on the chemistry of dietary fats. What ultimately matters in my mind is longevity and the guidelines for that are much easier to discern than the impact of random combinations of food and drink.

      Good Luck!

  99. VINCE says:

    Looking at a Quest report from last year, my Lipid panel official report does not list as much detail as yours. Is there a specific type of report your doctor had ran? I have a lab appoint this Friday and want to request additional analysis, however I’m not sure what I would ask my MD to request.

    Thanks!

  100. Razwell says:

    Anthony Colpo is up to more unfair Gary Taubes bashing. My rebutall can be found at my blog.

    Anthony Colpo is NOT a genuine scientist. GENUINE scientists understand obesity is hellishly complex and far, far from solved.

    GENUINE science admits vast unknowns about obesity. Colpo et al admit NONE of that.

    I think I have done a good job of discrediting CarbSane and Colpo completely with the information from GENUINE science by world renowned obesity scientists at my blog.

    To solve obesity we will need a complete explanation of the fat cell lipid exchange mechanism . We do not even know the chemical behavior of fat cell receptors currently.

    Top tier, world renowned obesity scientist Dr. Jeffrey Friedman ADMITS eat less move more does NOT work to solve obesity and we need to look toward in 21 st century medical science advances to guide us, rather than an often repeated NOSTRUM . As we discard our belief systens and dogma and assumptions a NEW VIEW EMERGES.

    One day Manuel Uribe and numerous other morbidly obese 800 pound plus people who suffer will be succesfully treated and cured.

    Fat cell dysregulation is a disease state. it is MORE than time for the medical commnity, and diet industry to TAKE RESPONSIBLITY for the FAILURE of their own fat loss advice., Scmmers ALWAYS put the blame on the patient, rather than EXAMINING the efficacy of their own methods.

    Obesity is almost as hereditary as HEIGHT.

    Intelligent readers will be able to tell whose information is the real deal.

  101. Wolf Rhys says:

    Looks like a great report. I just did a VAP through HealthcheckUSA.

    I’m not sure what to think because

    1. LDL Density Pattern was A (good)
    2. Metabolic Syndrome Risk? No (good)
    3. Triglycerides 106 (decent)
    4. Lp(a) 5 (good)

    5. apoB100 184 (Seems very bad)

    Part of the problem I’m having is interpreting a test like this. If I go to my doctor, she will faint at the overall cholesterol and prescribe statins.

  102. Paula says:

    “EVER TRIPPED OVER AN INCH?”

    Dang, I’m going to start stealing other people’s posts from the internet, that’s what I’m gonna do! I was googling to see if I could find reactions to GT’s “Is Sugar Toxic” article and I like this lady! Dana Seilhan.

    http://www.grist.org/corn/2011-04-22-taubes-sugar-makes-excellent-case-diversifying-agriculture

    And after watching the documentary “King Corn” and reading Lierre Keith’s “The Vegetarian Myth,” I totally agree with what Dana S. says here – in short, dig it — and she’s very funny!

    24 Apr 2011 10:48am DANA SEILHAN WRITES:

    Animal fats were all we *had* before the advent of industrial food and it was probably the only thing sparing us from completely ruined health on a diet that heavy in grains. People don’t understand that grains make us sick too–paleopathologists have seen proof of it in the remains of ancient societies. They can tell a farmer culture from a forager (hunter-gatherer) culture just by how diseased and underdeveloped the remains look.

    And yes, sometimes you should demonize a food group.

    We don’t get nourishment from a group of food (and we don’t get nourishment from calories–good lord, man, calories are a legal fiction, not a real object! Ever tripped over an inch?), we get nourishment from nutrients. If we’re getting enough of the nutrients we need, it doesn’t matter where they come from.

    What I’d like to see happen with American food production–and I realize this is a pipe dream–is that we bring back the bison herds. I mean into the millions like they had been before we came along and mass-slaughtered them. Fill the Great Plains with the herds again. We’d have more animal food than we’d know what to do with and that’s a far better use of Plains land than growing crops on it.

    Don’t put them on feedlots, just harvest them when they’re ready. Meat would become so amazingly cheap that we would become truly food secure. And have people grow their own vegetables on their land or in community gardens. Presto, our nutritional needs would be taken care of. If someone wanted to eat grain they’d have to grow it themselves–and they’d quickly understand why grain’s not an efficient food even when it’s fed to people, much less all the health problems it causes.

    Pipe dream. But in my ideal world that’s what we’d do.

  103. Paula says:

    As far as Dana Seilhan’s “Bring back the bison herds” … I love that! Pipe dream? Well, I’m smoking it! Joel Salatin has the right idea with his Polyface Farm and sustainable agriculture. We’re going to visit this summer. Watch him on YouTube. After you watch King Corn and Big River (both by Curt Ellis and Ian Cheney)…a couple of stunning documentaries (on streaming Netflix) by these zany but serious guys…who set out to do and see things for themselves.

    After the revelation of reading GCBC and GT’s other things on diet (and finding how incredibly well the diet works) and THEN getting hooked on learning more about it all…in short, stumbling on “King Corn,” “Food, Inc.” – reading and watching Mary C. Vernon, reading the WAPF folks on the venerated “soy” with its thyroid issues (babies should be no where NEAR it, much less the sugar in baby formula) — yadda yadda yadda, one thing is clear:

    We are planting America MASSIVELY — watch the King Corn on streaming Netflix, then read Lierre Keith “Vegetarian Myth” — in CORN, WHEAT and SOY. MASSIVELY. You won’t believe it till you see it. They ruin the earth (anhydrous ammonia anyone? Kills all the earthworms, and THEN spray your Round-up on your Round-up Ready Type 2 yellow dent corn etc. genetically modified by Monsanto to withstand the Round-up…).

    CORN, WHEAT and SOY are all lowest common denominators, nutrition-wise. They’re TERRIBLE for us and for the animals we force to consume them. The corn burns thru their stomachs, they have lifespans of less than 2 years instead of 12… Instead of grazing on pasture which they were meant to do (no fecal effluent; on pasture they just fertilizes their own food!), we torture these animals in CAFOs (confined animal feeding operations) that cover half the state of Montana, not to mention other states, and then all that fecal effluent is collected in massive lakes, to be sent MASSIVELY down our rivers — not to mention all the pesticides sprayed on this HUGE ACREAGE of crappy s—- crops…

    THEN, just to be so wonderful, we dump all our excess corn (that we’re not making into ridiculous ethanol) on developing countries to ruin their economies…their farmers’ incentives and lives, and everyone’s health…just as we’re doing to our own.

    Ellis and Cheney’s “Big River” documentary shows them following the river that runs thru these (massively planted, fertilized and pesticided) states, thru water treatment plants (where they interview those who run them who say the bad stuff can’t be gotten out of the water) and then they arrive at the Louisiana gulf, off of which is created a dead zone the size of the state of CT. Shrimp off Louisiana? Not no more, honey. Fishermen in Louisiana take good-will trips up the river to try get states NOT to fertilize so heavily. But the gov’t lets them. In fact The gov’t makes this all this happen. The EPA gives these heavily subsidized farmers all along the Mississippi an “OK” to pollute. They’re exempted.

    Not to mention all the pharmaceuticals we employ due to the crappy SAD diet consumed in Western societies. THINK of how ALL the medications people take end up in the water supply. They don’t? They do. This is not just a concern of me on a screed. I know a fertility doctor who has seen a HUGE difference since the 1980s in his practice; much more difficult to get women to conceive than it used to be. Now he has to take every trick out of the bag to effect it, and sometimes that still doesn’t work. He wonders about all the hormones of all these women on the pill (95% of the of-age female population) peeing out this man-made concoction all their fertile lives into our water supply — what it’s doing not only to women, fertility-wise, but to men as well.

    If I had $700,000 – I’d give it to GT to study this pharmaceutical angle. The BCPs, the statins, the Viagra, Zoloft, and God knows what else… What would we call this book?

    • Galia L. says:

      Here is a stolen blog post from Don Matez http://donmatesz.blogspot.com/2011/03/operation-hope-meat-is-medicine-for.html about benefits of herding to the earth

      “Savory won the 2010 Buckminster Fuller Challenge Prize of $100,000 for the Africa Center for Holistic Management (ACHM) in Zimbabwe by demonstrating that by INCREASING the number of livestock on barren land by 400% we can convert it from desert back to productive grassland:”

      • Paula says:

        Thanks Galia, great stuff, I’ve saved it! Right on the money!

        Reminds me of Will Allen, Founder/CEO of Growing Power, Inc. located at Silver Spring Drive, Milwaukee, WI. He got a MacArthur Genius Grant for his work in urban (vertical use of land/space, not horizontal) sustainable agriculture, has some great stuff on YouTube. Allen raises tilapia (and yellow perch) where the water is competely cleaned by plants grown long-wise above the long fish tanks (a pump is used to get water up to the plants and it all cycles in a circle; never a need to “clean” the water in any other fashion).

        Farmers “cut out” of small-scale farming are being taught by Allen to convert their barns (in the midwest! Land of the cold winter!) to raise fish and plants in this way. The tilapia need heated water, so they’re above-ground; the perch need cold water so their tanks are dug in-ground.

        Allen’s urban farming community (in the same bldg where they raise fish) also creates compost in huge bins using worms; very cool how they separate the worms from the earth to start a new batch…

        • Galia L. says:

          I do believe that food production model will be different in a future.
          Humans survieved bacause they used their brains in order to adjust for
          changing enviroment. Earth is not big enough to feed growing population
          according to current model of food production , whatever it is meat or grain
          production, but it doesn’t mean we all have to sustain on grains.
          Agricalture always distrois enviroment, herding is not. Cows are not the
          only animals suitable to be a meat source.What about goats? What about
          rabbits? They breed well, taste good.There is a lot of food wasted, instead
          of being fed to the farm animals. We live in a wasteful society.Who knows,
          may be in a future we would be breeding incects in order to get our
          proteins, or the regulation in my subdivision would require having couple
          goats or sheeps instead of maintaining a perfect lawn using fertolisers,
          fungecides,pesticides,herbicides (whole warfere, actually, against Florida
          inviroment.).

  104. Gary — We can fairly well ascertain that the beginnings of agriculture on this earth and the effects of this deliberate “farming” and the growing of plants and vegetables, some tens of thousands of years ago, in lets say Asia and Greece and the Mideast and Central and South America and other places throughout this world, be it one place it all “started or began” and then spread from there, or the mysterious evolution of same, in different parts of the world in approximately the same time eras, is an unknown — We do know from observation that this deliberate and accidental seeding of natures wild seeds in any given area and then nurtured by man, produced abundant and manageable plant-life and crops and man’s proliferations began. These were some eons ago, we know that. — What we don’t know, is exactly when the “hybridization” of these “plants” began. — We do know some things about the civilizations that developed in response to this hybridization and agriculture that we now call “hybrid carbohydrates” and the resulting “high carbohydrate” and “high yield” and “high sugar” content and consumption of these plants by man. — These hybrid, high sugar content plants, made sugars abundantly available to man and he loved it, as he loves it, now. — They also made him stimulated and “high” and effected his whole being, but he didn’t that and still doesn’t “know that”, yet today. Hybrid carbohydrates, right along with agriculture, are the core of this dilemma we find ourselves in. — Alcohol, the highest form of these sugars is also a major player here, as is caffeine and it’s effects on man as well as nicotine and it’s effects. — Keep up the great work Gary, you are on to ” The Mother Lode”, but it’s not “Gold”, it’s greater, much greater, than gold. It’s the core of modernization and civilized life and man. Be that “good” or be that “bad” is up to the observer and you to say. — Good luck and may the “sugar and stimulant gods” be with you. Tom

    • Here is a point to ponder. — We all assume that the hunter/gatherer that turned to agriculture and farming, kicked off the population explosion that eventually got us to this six billion plus people on this earth, today. It seems logical and there are few to none other explanations for this phenomena. — Now lets take my “hybrid carbohydrate” hypothesis, that these massive amounts of sugar in these hybrids are “stimulant drugs” in that capacity and that did, in fact, induce this “feeding frenzy” and “sexual frenzy” that made for this proliferation and not simply the farming and raising of crops. — An interesting point I believe. Additionally and cumulatively, this is where I believe this whole “mental” and “Psyche” phenomena stems from. — Sugar and carbohydrates in these concentrations, are stimulant drugs with enormous implications. “They exaggerate everything”, besides destroying our body chemistry in the process.

  105. Anonymous says:

    Mr. Taubes, you are my hero. Yes, I am a dietitian and a medical librarian!

    One question—your new book had the Duke diet which included lots of “greens” and veggies; your blog indicates no veggies in your diet. I’m curious if you think adding (or skipping) them makes any difference?
    I have read both of your books from cover to cover (LOVED Good calories, Bad Calories) and admire your writing skill so much that words fail me!
    p.s. do you ever “cheat” on your diet…have a piece of fruit or chocolate occasionally…

  106. Anonymous says:

    Have you ever commented on this study that is touted by Dean Ornish?:

    “A major study was just published in the Annals of Internal Medicine from Harvard. In approximately 85,000 women who were followed for 26 years and 45,000 men who were followed for 20 years, researchers found that all-cause mortality rates were increased in both men and women who were eating a low-carbohydrate Atkins diet based on animal protein.

    However, all-cause mortality rates as well as cardiovascular mortality rates were decreased in those eating a plant-based diet low in animal protein and low in refined carbohydrates. Although this plant-based diet was called an “Eco-Atkins” diet, it’s essentially the same diet that I have been recommending and studying for more than 30 years.”

    Ornish says you have to look at stuff like mortality and not just risk factors like HDL. What do you think about this? Is there any reason to think this study isn’t legit?

  107. Anonymous says:

    I am curious if GT has read the article on HuffPost – Low-Carb Diets Linked With Type 2 Diabetes – it seems to be predicated on the science that GT found to be incorrect/unfounded. But I would be interested if he had a response. link http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tim-harlan-md/lowcarb-diets-linked-with_b_851506.html

    • I’ve been wondering the a same thing. A rebuttal by a respected source like Gary is sorely needed. That article is a travesty and needs to be answered with the science of insulin and sugar metabolism.

  108. Great book and article ! Thanks for postng your labs , but I’d like to see a more accurate determination of your LDL-particle count – its the NUMBER of LDL particles that determine risk, not their SIZE. This lab (Atherotech) uses a “calculated ” measure of LDL particles, their calculated apoB , rather than a clinical outcomes validated, direct measure of atherogenic particles, such as a real radioimmunoassay ApoB or better yet, the NMR LDL-P (see http://www.lipoprofile.com or http://www.myhdl.com). It would also be interesting to see what inflammatory markers reveal (such as PLA2 and myeloperoxidase, available at http://www.myhdl.com) .
    For those interested in advanced lipoprotein testing, these two labs are the gold standards, and one can find a Clinical Lipidologist (“cholesterol expert”) through the National Lipid Assn. website at http://www.learnyourlipids.com.

    Gregory S Pokrywka MD FACP FNLA NCMP
    Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Women’s Menopausal Health

    Assistant Professor of Medicine
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
    Diplomate American Board Clinical Lipidology and Fellow, National Lipid Assn.
    Certified Menopause Practitioner: North American Menopause Society
    Director: Baltimore Lipid Center. Board Member, South East Lipid Assn.

    • Anonymous says:

      Correct me if I’m wrong, but if you have a certain mass of LDL particles, and know their size, you can calculate their number.  And if you have a mass of LDL particles, and you know their number, you should be able to calculate their size.

      That is to say, if I had “200″ LDL, and I found out I had 50,000 particles, I’d know those particles were very small, and if I had “200″ LDL, and I found out that they were all the size of “1″ LDL, I’d know I only have 200 of those particles.

  109. Paula says:

    This shows pics of bones of diff groups…From Dr. Eades…

    http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/low-carb-diets/nutrition-and-health-in-agriculturalists-and-hunter-gatherers/

    Tom – Interesting hypotheses! I remember the first time I came upon any such ideas: reading Protein Power Life Plan by the Eades, and their “aside” that we may have settled down to raise crops due to the addiction factor of grains (including making them into alcohol…very addictive…). No wonder man settled down, to hang out at all the bars in town ;-)

    Some other hypotheses about the world, agriculture coming to the fore and the world becoming more populous:

    Agriculture, Cities and the Arts seem always tied; the arts (metallurgy, etc – I’m not talking about the fine arts! medicine, mechanical farming devices) allow us to sustain greater populations.

    POPULATION FLUCTUATION IN THE PAST: Aristotle believed the world is eternal and experiences periodic cataclysms — plagues and what not — during which human civilization is reduced in size, resorts to primitive savagery whence it slowly rises, recovering all that was previously lost, until the next cataclysm…

    Then came Francis Bacon (1561 – 1626) with his project of “torturing Nature to reveal her secrets for the relief of man’s estate” – i.e. the project of modern science. Which wasn’t NECESSARY. Man had survived and would have survived without it. Irony: Science definitely has brought about the “relief of man’s estate” – a great prolongation of our lifespans (esp. if we eat LCHF ;-) while at the same time giving us the ability to destroy ourselves and our world…

    Hmmmm…

    Does make you wish we could start over.

  110. Razwell says:

    CarbSane EXPOSED at my blog. She blocks all my comments, the better I expose the lack of evidence in regards to the Caloric Hypothesis .

    Did you ever notice that Harvard educated doctor, Dr. Weil , supports Gary Taubes? And that the only people who rail on him all the time are UNDEREDUCATED self appointed Internet gurus who are DEEPLY ignornat of the complexity of obesity?

  111. tim says:

    After my wife’s recent blood work to (satisfy her doctor about her cholesterol), I was interested in Gary’s lipid profile. The high HDL was especially interesting since some folks commented on this as being really high and good. My wife’s HDL was 182 which was higher than her LDL of 154. Her VLDL was only 5 and her triglycerides were 24. Her total cholesterol was 341. That was down from 420 just six months ago. However, her HDL is always high, giving her a favorable ratio. The doctor is amazed and has never seen an HDL this high, certainly not higher than the LDL at this level. Even with the high HDL, he wanted to make sure about her heart and vascular system (conventional doctors are still so keyed into the cholesterol/heart hypothesis!) so he ordered three ultrasound scans of her peripheral arteries, aorta and carotid artery. He then ordered a complete heart workup including a treadmill stress test. All arteries were clear and the stress test was normal. My wife is 56, weighs 121 and is 5′ 5″. She eats a paleo diet including bone marrow beef broth, heart, liver and egg (yolks only!)–all from pastured animals. She eats cold-water fish some and takes cod liver oil. No grains, sugars, caffeine, processed foods (except for the cod liver oil) or fake sugars.

    My question is this; if a good ratio of HDL to LDL is favorable but a high total is not, how does a conventional doctor decide whether she is at high risk or low risk of heart disease. Since we don’t buy into the whole “cholesterol is the root of all evil” idea, the levels don’t matter to us. It’s just that their logic seems to break down when trying to deal with a case like my wife. By the way, after all the tests, her doctor seemed satisfied that she is “okay” and said that he had never before seen a lipid profile like hers.

    If Gary, or anybody else, would like to answer one other question, we would love to know what supplements, if any, are are recommended with this kind of “paleo” diet.

    • Paula says:

      Tim, I like the particulars of your wife’s diet and her numbers are amazing! I’m going to get hubby to try it.

      The famous “Hyperlipid” also has very high total cholesterol and is not worried about it.

      Here, by the way, Hyperlipid writes about what they feed their kids: http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/search/label/What%20do%20I%20eat%3F%20%281%29
      http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/search/label/What%20do%20I%20eat%3F%20%281%29

      As for your question: “If a good ratio of HDL to LDL is favorable but a high total is not, how does a conventional doctor decide whether she is at high risk or low risk of heart disease?”

      FOR THAT, I GIVE YOU (THANK YOU, G.T.!) p. 172 of Good Calories, Bad Calories (of course conventional doctors don’t know anything and are just drug pushers, till — hope springs eternal — they read this):

      “…Peter Kwiterovich, a lipid-metabolism specialist from Johns Hopkins, together with Allan Sniderman, a cardiologist from McGill University. Kwiterovich and Sniderman collaborated with Krauss on the last of his three papers on the heterogeneity of LDL. In 1983, they reported that the disproportionate elevation in the apo B protein in heart-disease patients was due to a disproportionate elevation in the amount of the smallest and densest of the low-density lipoproteins.

      “This explained what Krauss had set out to understand: why two people can have identical LDL cholesterol levels and yet one develops atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease and the other doesn’t – why LDL cholesterol is only a marginal risk factor for heart disease. If we have low LDL cholesterol, but it’s packaged almost exclusively in small, dense LDL particles – the smaller balloons – that translates to a higher risk of heart disease. If we have high LDL cholesterol, but it’s packaged in a smaller number of large, fluffy LDL particles – the larger balloons – then our heart disease risk is significantly lower. Small, dense LDL, simply because it is small and dense, appears to be more atherogenic, more likely to cause atherosclerosis.

      “Small, dense LDL can squeeze more easily through damaged areas of the artery wall to form incipient atherosclerotic plaques. Sniderman describes small, dense LDL as the equivalent of “little bits of sand” that get in everywhere and stick more avidly. The relative dearth of cholesterol in these particles may also cause structural changes in the protein that make it easier for it to adhere to the artery wall to begin with. And because small, dense LDL apparently remains in the bloodstream longer than larger and fluffier LDL, it has more time and greater opportunities to do its damage.

      “Finally, it’s possible that LDL has to be oxidized – the biological equivalent, literally, of rusting – before it can play a role in atherosclerosis, and the existing evidence suggests that small, dense LDL oxidizes more easily than the larger, fluffier variety.

      “Through the 1980s, Krauss continued to refine this understanding of how LDL subspecies affect heart disease. He discovered that the appearance of LDL in the population falls into two distinct patterns or traits, which he called pattern A and pattern B. Pattern A is dominated by large, fluffy LDL [GARY’S LIPID PROFILE SHOWS THIS!!!!] and implies a low risk of heart disease; pattern B is the dangerous one, with predominantly small, dense LDL. Pattern B is invariably accompanied by high triglycerides and low HDL. Pattern A is not. In 1988, Krauss and his collaborators reported in JAMA that heart-disease patients were three times more likely to have pattern B than pattern A. Krauss called pattern B the atherogenic profile. Diabetics have the identical pattern.”

      • tim says:

        Paula,
        Thanks, that’s very interesing and it answers my question. We are reading GCBC but haven’t gotten the part you quoted. By the way, my wife first tried this kind of diet because of severe hypoglycemia. She had passed out several times from low blood sugar so it was getting dangerous. Plus, whe was dealing with Crohns/IBS for years. The inflammation from that problem also caused esophageal pain mimickiing a heart attack. Well, this diet of raw heart, liver, yolks, bone marrow beef broth with the occasional cooked wild-caught salmon has solved both problems and she is doing well. No more pain!

        • Paula says:

          Tim,

          I’m glad to hear she is doing SO well – plus she has the most amazing numbers I’ve ever seen! I really think LCHF is the answer to just about everything. My 17-year-old daughter’s not completely on board; she started laughing hysterically at the table on Mother’s Day — when I finally got her to be coherent, she had been trying to say that she was sure I blamed the extinction of the dinosaurs on High Fructose Corn Syrup. :-_

          Here’s a VERY interesting url: http://www.scdiet.org/7archives/lutz/lutz7.html Just do Ctrl F and type in Crohn’s Disease to get to that section. It’s Wolfgang Lutz, M.D.’s “Dismantling a Myth: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in Our Diet.” He talks about what LCHF can do for LOTS of conditions.

    • Philippa says:

      Tim,
      The only answer to your question that I can think of is that the conventional doctor you refer to is misinformed. It’s well established by now that low HDL and high triglycerides are the most potent predictors of heart disease. I would suggest that it’s impossible to be at risk with a high total cholesterol count if your wife’s HDL and triglycerides are stellar.

      I’m in a similar situation myself and it’s something I’ve given a lot of thought.

      Philippa
      http://carboholicsanonymous.blogspot.com/2011/04/high-hdl-is-good-for-you.html

    • Elenor says:

      “a treadmill stress test”  I suppose he ‘forgot’ to mention that stress tests are pretty useless for women?!  {eye roll}  Wonder how much $ he makes for prescribing that test…

  112. Paula says:

    LOW CARB MEMORY: Watching the game with friends on Thanksgiving. All the guys in a row on the couch. Big Belly #1, Big Belly #2, Big Belly #3, Flat Belly #1 (my hubby), and Big Belly #4. Big Belly #4 points to his (Big Belly #4′s) belly, then hubby’s belly and says, “Hey, what’s up with that?” Ha ha ha! If you knew this guy! His joking insinuation was, “Hey, we’re ‘normal’ – what’s up with you?”

    After being blessed truly by personal knowledge of LCHF’s efficacy in reaching, as you say, one’s “normal” state, it becomes poignant and disturbing to see all about one people to whom GT’s (and Robert Atkins’) message is obviously essential. Yet one is separated from them by a wall that human communication can’t breach. And if you try, it’s like telling an alcoholic “Put down that drink and you can get your life and your loved ones back” but he cannot, being owned, and I mean owned, by his problem. Maybe we’re lousy communicators: I think I’ll have a card that says “Taubes” printed out to hand to anyone who comments on how hubby and I now look. And refuse to say more!
    I think the secret is, people have to learn each thing (that GCBC teaches) themselves. They have to be disabused of notions (with GCBC’s proofs) one at a time (a wonderful process as those who have read GCBC can attest), that one pent-up schpiel just cannot teach them. They need to be initiated into the secrets themSELVES. By an education THEY seek.
    The cancer not seen in traditional diets, but rampant in Western ones: My best girlfriend, my age (56) got CANCER last summer (actually, she’s Big Belly #4′s wife) and after radiation and lots of hope that it had been squelched for good; it returned last month – now it’s chemo and radiation. And now this woman who has taught me so much in my life — she can analyze a book, a movie, a play, like no one else — is probably going down for the count. She won’t give up the carbs and sugar (tho in WWGF which hubby and I just reread, there is one mention of LCHF curing cancer potentially, if memory serves; it would certainly prolong her life). I’ve promised not to bother her any more after subjecting her to my schpiel a final time – before her 1st encounter with the cancer I’d given her a copy of GCBC…but people are resistant… :-/ Even tho she says she KNOWS Atkins works because she did it in her youth… Talk about poignant.
    Talk about who can ever talk to me about the things she can talk to me about?

    • Anonymous says:

      @ Paula – you might get her a copy of Detoxify or Die (I forget the author’s name); worth a shot. I can’t imagine not reading something like that if I had cancer. Course I can’t imagine not trying the LCHF diet if I had it either. Sigh.

      • Paula says:

        Thanks Marcia, I’m going to look that book up!  It’s hard to describe my friend.  Adamantine.  Completely unmoveable.  Her mother was a war bride (married an American G.I.) who was Austrian and did some amazing feats of heroism during the war (she CHOSE to stay behind to care for a ton of Austrians who were being left behind by the army – the army was escaping and she could have gone with them since she worked for them)…  Due to this choice she lost an eye to shrapnel.  A stubborn woman who saw her duty and did it.

        Her daughter (my friend) is stubborn like that, but it works against her.  I think my friend sees her duty as being that of dying.  She doesn’t have the most fabulous life and part of me thinks she wants to die.

        Jerry Brunelle is interviewed in 2006 here, regarding how he boosted his immune system and beat a cancer he had little chance (via regular medicine) of beating:  http://www.healthruthrevealed.com/articles/1150/article  Discusses how cancer loves SUGAR.

        Now I’m going to go look up that book you recommended!

  113. Paula says:

    Added to Weight Loss, Nutrition, Diet on Tue 04/19/2011

    The Return of the Man Who Thinks Everything I Say Is Wrong

    By Mehmet Oz, MDA little over a month ago, we had award-winning science writer Gary Taubes on the show, who my producers aptly nick-named “The Man Who Thinks Everything I Say Is Wrong.” Gary is a well-respected journalist who has been heralding theories that contradict the medical community’s most fundamental assumptions about weight loss. I invited him to the show because, despite our conflicting beliefs, I still respect his drive and research. The main thing that we clash about is diet. Gary believes that eating fat does not actually make you fat – but rather, that weight gain is linked to the way your hormones respond to carbohydrates. While I generally disagree with this statement (I’m a huge proponent of fruits and whole grains), there are a couple of carbs where Gary’s theory proves sound – white flour and sugar. Although you may not think of the powdery sweetener you spoon into your coffee as being in the same family as bread and pasta, the building blocks of refined sugars called sucrose are carbohydrate molecules: fructose and glucose. In a recent article in The New York Times, Gary explores the danger of sugar, referring to both sucrose (white and brown sugar) and high-fructose corn syrup, and metabolic syndrome – a group of risk factors that make you inclined to develop heart disease and diabetes. The piece maintains that the way we metabolize sugar has many harmful implications for your health. Although inconclusive, this research raises some very relevant questions about our diets. Gary was certainly persuaded, and he practices what he preaches in terms of what he puts on his plate. During his appearance on the show, I wanted to put Gary’s ideas to the test, so for 24 hours, I ate only foods that Gary recommended. Because he believes that saturated fat is not detrimental to cholesterol levels, Gary’s diet consists of eggs, cheese and animal protein. My experience was not a pleasant one, and I maintain that the long-term repercussions of such a diet would be detrimental. If I didn’t gain weight, I believe that my overall health would’ve suffered. As we debated, I challenged Gary to get his blood work done to truly evaluate how his diet was affecting his body. He emailed me back this week and I was surprised by the results. All his cholesterol measurements were in the optimal range. In a person who eats a very high amount of protein, we would be concerned about their kidney function; this factor is completely normal in Gary.This is wonderful news and I’m truly relieved for Gary and his family. Although he will argue that these tests exonerate saturated fat, I believe that his positive bill of health is a result of him avoiding simple carbs like sugar and processed white flour. Among other consequences, these foods have been shown to increase levels of triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood). These results do not sway my stance on what you should eat. I stand staunchly behind the value of disease-fighting foods. Incorporating fruits, vegetables and whole grains into your meals can help prevent everything from Alzheimer’s to cancer, along with providing blood pressure benefits and antioxidants. There’s a lot less sugar in fruit and vegetables than processed foods, and the sugar in these foods is bound by fiber and thus digested more slowly. I believe this wholeheartedly because I have seen firsthand (both on the show and in the operating room) the real consequences of food. I encourage you to research what you’re eating. The next time you grab a packet of sweetener or are choosing a snack, be aware of how it will affect your body. Your health is too important to not be informed.

    • montmorency says:

      “relieved” – he’s a patronising little so-and-so isn’t he?

      Sugar in these foods bound by fiber:  Vegetables are one thing, but I question how effectively the fiber in fruits slows down the absorption of the sugars. I googled to find how much fiber was in a banana, and got a hit with a whole list of  foods. This was a site about rectal health not blood sugar issues as it happens. Anyway, I found this quote:

      “*Important as dietary fiber is, laboratory technicians have not yet been able to ascertain the exact total content in many foods, especially vegetables and fruits, because of its complexity. Consequently, estimates vary from one source to another. Where differing estimates have been found, an approximation is given in the chart, as indicated by an asterisk. The same symbol following calorie content means the number of calories has been estimated, varying
      according to other added ingredients, especially fats and sugars, and to the size of the “average” fruit or vegetable unit.”

      So basically, we may not know how much fiber there is in a banana, but anyway, they say it’s 3 gm in an average size one. I wonder how much of that is in the “string” that you peel away? But the amount is irrelevant if it’s not actually doing what people like Oz say it’s doing. Has this been tested?

      You would have to do a test something like:

      Group 1 is given pieces of uniform weight fruit to eat and their insulin and glucose reaction tested at intervals. Identical weight fruit would be analysed to find the sugar content.

      Group 2 is given the exact equivalent of sugars in the form of a drink, diluted by the same amount of water that is in the fruit.

      Group 3 is given the exact equivalent of sugars in the form of junk food (if an appropriate sort of junk food can be found).  

      All candidates have their insulin and glucose reaction tested at appropriate intervals and compared

      Have any such tests been documented in the literature.?

    • montmorency says:

      “relieved” – he’s a patronising little so-and-so isn’t he?

      Sugar in these foods bound by fiber:  Vegetables are one thing, but I question how effectively the fiber in fruits slows down the absorption of the sugars. I googled to find how much fiber was in a banana, and got a hit with a whole list of  foods. This was a site about rectal health not blood sugar issues as it happens. Anyway, I found this quote:

      “*Important as dietary fiber is, laboratory technicians have not yet been able to ascertain the exact total content in many foods, especially vegetables and fruits, because of its complexity. Consequently, estimates vary from one source to another. Where differing estimates have been found, an approximation is given in the chart, as indicated by an asterisk. The same symbol following calorie content means the number of calories has been estimated, varying
      according to other added ingredients, especially fats and sugars, and to the size of the “average” fruit or vegetable unit.”

      So basically, we may not know how much fiber there is in a banana, but anyway, they say it’s 3 gm in an average size one. I wonder how much of that is in the “string” that you peel away? But the amount is irrelevant if it’s not actually doing what people like Oz say it’s doing. Has this been tested?

      You would have to do a test something like:

      Group 1 is given pieces of uniform weight fruit to eat and their insulin and glucose reaction tested at intervals. Identical weight fruit would be analysed to find the sugar content.

      Group 2 is given the exact equivalent of sugars in the form of a drink, diluted by the same amount of water that is in the fruit.

      Group 3 is given the exact equivalent of sugars in the form of junk food (if an appropriate sort of junk food can be found).  

      All candidates have their insulin and glucose reaction tested at appropriate intervals and compared

      Have any such tests been documented in the literature.?

  114. Adam Ross says:

    Gary and others -

    I’d love to see some menu plans (or a weekly food diary) for Taubes-style eating. Is anyone willing to make some suggestions?

  115. Paula says:

    A SCARY VIEW FROM “THAT WORLD” OUT THERE – A COMMENT FROM TODAY, FROM DR. EADES’ BLOG:

    Author: Melody
    Comment:
    I just spent a day in the hospital (ruling out post-surgical blood clot/heart problems) where the cardiologist tried to put me on a ‘diabetic diet’ of 160gm of carbs and half the protein I usually eat. When I told him I eat less than 45gm per day and only in low carb vegies (no grains, fruit, etc.) and that if I ate his diet my sugars would be high enough to need insulin, his response was “well that’s why they make medication.” Amazing. He did remove the dietary restrictions when I told him my husband would be bringing my meals in for me.

  116. Paula says:

    A SCARY VIEW FROM “THAT WORLD” OUT THERE – A COMMENT FROM TODAY, FROM DR. EADES’ BLOG:

    Author: Melody
    Comment:
    I just spent a day in the hospital (ruling out post-surgical blood clot/heart problems) where the cardiologist tried to put me on a ‘diabetic diet’ of 160gm of carbs and half the protein I usually eat. When I told him I eat less than 45gm per day and only in low carb vegies (no grains, fruit, etc.) and that if I ate his diet my sugars would be high enough to need insulin, his response was “well that’s why they make medication.” Amazing. He did remove the dietary restrictions when I told him my husband would be bringing my meals in for me.

  117. “Then came Tom Bunnell” whom discovered the true and actual “beginnings of civilization”. — Being stimulant drugs called hybrid fruit and hybrid grains and hybrid vegetables..milk was soon to follow as was alcohol and processed grains and processed sugars, along with juice’s and syrups. Caffeine – Nicotine. — But man didn’t know it and man still doesn’t know it, and he was laughed at, and ridiculed and scorned and made fun of and ignored and transposed and banned and disgraced and forgotten forever. — What a fool this man is to say such things. ” He thinks were dumb monkeys, “higher than a kite” but we don’t know it”. — Somebody shut this man up! — Outrageous! Stupidity! — He plunders, on and on. But to no avail. Such a disgrace! A pitiful example of humanity and mind and function and disposition. — Yet he thinks this is real. What a fool! — To think that this is the core to civilization. “Stimulant Drugs”! — “Powerful, potent, meaningful, stimulant drugs. — “All the kings horses and all the kings men”! — And Gods, lots and lots of gods and gods, but one only. One and only. — God and “all the kings horses and all the kings men”. — No we’re not stimulated! — What a fool I am! A fool I am! I am1 I am! I am! — God Bless!!! — We need help. Lots and lots of help here. — Taubes is our man.

  118. Anonymous says:

    Would you have posted it, if your results were less positive? I doubt it and I think other people will doubt that to: http://markyoungtrainingsystems.com/2011/05/should-you-buy-why-we-get-fat/

    John

    • He wasn’t confronted by that dilemma, was he? Is it not unethical to cast doubt on person’s integrity based on what you imagine he might do but hasn’t? What possible defense could someone offer against your implied accusation?

    • While I was mowing the lawn, your post came to mind, and reminded me of a Mencken quote that is apropos:

      It is hard to believe that a man is telling the truth when you know that you would lie if you were in his place. — H. L. Mencken

    • Philippa says:

      Your question implies to me that you don’t really believe what Gary and the other low/zero carbers are saying about the role of carbs in the metabolism. Just saying.

      Philippa

      http://www.carboholicsanonymous.com

  119. It must have been mentioned, but I’m too busy to look: you don’t need a prescription to order blood tests. There are many sites selling discounted tests obtainable through LabCorp.

  120. Gary, when are you going to post a Fumento-like shot of yourself?
    http://www.bigfatblog.com/images/fumento.jpg

  121. Gary, when are you going to post a Fumento-like shot of yourself?
    http://www.bigfatblog.com/images/fumento.jpg

  122. John says:

    I don’t know. You caved in pretty early, a lot earlier than that other guy. I wonder that you didn’t lose it in the ocean or that Oz’ commandos didn’t invade your fortress to obscond it. What does it say when important intellectuals submit to the demands of raving lunatics with bad hair? Maybe you should run for president?

  123. Razwell says:

    Dr. Robert Eckl just confirms again what myself, Dr. Stephan Guyenet, Dr. Linda Bacon ,Dr. Jeffrey Friedman and other genuine scientists have said all along, and it completely refutes CarbSane. Namely, that body fat regulation is extremely complex, tightly regulated by the hypothalamus, and full of vast unknowns. The brain seems to know when body fat dips too low.

    Also, insulin is a MAJOR player in fat storage , as Gary Taubes has shown with his work.

  124. Gary, great lab results! I was curious to see what the effect of eating, say, a bowl of steel-cut oats and one apple daily would have on those numbers. Let’s say over a period of two months. I’d love to see a “before/after” ….would your LDL be not quite as fluffy? Triglycerides spike? It would make for an interesting study I think….
    Happy belated bday, btw! :-)

  125. Anonymous says:

    “Sub-clinical, or hidden, gluten intolerance is a health problem at epidemic proportions in certain populations in the United States and remains largely unrecognized by conventional medicine.” (kalishresearch.com).
    My question is (perhaps rhetorical), WHY has gluten intolerance become such a health problem of epic, and epidemic proportions? I believe it is related to the AMA, USDA’s Food Pyramid suggestion that we eat carbs, and lots of them. And clearly GCBC, WWGF and Gary’s other articles are revealing the reason why, we have been eating too many carbs, and too much sugar!

    • Anonymous says:

      @ Skinqueen, couldn’t agree more. Grain is the original processed food (and, I believe, not good for humans or other living animals except, perhaps, mice who seem to love it); you can eat a raw oyster (well, maybe not everyone wants to but it’s possible); as far as I know, you can’t eat raw wheat — not for long, at any rate, and not with any good health results. I gave the stuff up in ’95 and noticed (among other not-so-pleasant side-effects that immediately disappeared) that my joints no longer hurt. All I needed for confirmation. People can bang on forever about the virtues of grains – I’m not buying it!

  126. “The “Origins of The Species and of “Man’s Mind” and Intelligence, “Discovered and Discussed and Disclosed”.
    By Tom Bunnell
    – A small herd of deer stood near a field by the edge of the forest and woods in northern North Alberta, Edmonton, B.C., Canada. — It was somewhat near dusk with darkness and a moonlit night slowly came forward. — It was warm and becoming dark in the evenings breeze of the coming nighttime. The moon was already rising slightly into the darkening sky. A perfect night for feeding and it was getting nearer and nearer to the annual birthing of the new fawns this year. The yearlings from the year before were romping and frolicking and playing about. It was in the early spring of the year and the young and old alike, frolicked and socialized as they ate and drank water and sniffed about from a nearby creek. All the while shaking off the long winters cold. It had been -40 below zero going on months to this point. It was pure bliss right now and a spirit filled mania had set in. It was also restful and peaceful and relaxing what they were having. They were having it all. The world could not have been a better place and the world could not have been brighter or purer or with less fault. — Then the twig snapped!All hands were instantly focused and alert. Adrenaline surged through their bodies. Their hearing and sense of smell and eyesight intensified instantly. Their eyes were wide and their pupils fully dilated. Their ears stood alert and their smell focused and intensified. — Their muscles and legs readied for instant flight as soon as they were to know what and where they should go, or they might just disappear like a wisp of smoke into the night and into their background, if that was the better of choice’s in this situation. If they hadn’t possibly been seen yet they might disappear like a wisp of smoke into their background. — They can do that, they can disappear right into their background if given the opportunity or if the opportunity avails itself. An indian can do this too.

    Moments later two squirrels came out, one chasing the other as they too, frolicked in the early springtime night.

    The deer relaxed and their adrenaline glands went back to normal, as did their seeing and other senses that had been alerted and intensified.

    Hybrid plants and hybrid fruits and hybrid vegetables and what I call hybrid carbohydrates in general, along with refined sugar and flour, like cocaine and speed, put this adrenaline like substance into our bloodstream non-stop from birth to the grave and 24/7 and /365 days a year for our entire lifetimes. Man and our adrenaline glands never go back to normal because we never stop ingesting these hybrid carbohydrate stimulants.

    Country singer “Jewel”, the one from Alaska, — Merle Haggards prodigy, — Does a song where she sings “They say you are only half alive until you give the whitening a try”. — That’s lines of speed or coke or methamphetamine snorted or ingested or smoked into your system.

    Speed on top of speed if what I’m saying is true.

    What they didn’t tell her, or probably didn’t or don’t even know themselves, is that when you get into this false high, it not only alters your senses but your thought patterns, it alters your life dramatically and not for the good.

    Then when you try to enter the normal world which is rich and full in itself, instead you drop to a low you might not be able to get out of. Then you truly are “half alive”.

    Playing with our senses is not a good thing to do and the adverse effects far outnumber this false high and euphoria experience .

    Cocaine and amphetamine and hybrid carbohydrates, induce “highs” and otherwise, and are mans road to complete destruction and nothing less than that.

    There is also a false sense of confidence that comes with these “highs”. — We can’t be told anything.

    We will listen attentively and then go right back to what we were doing.

    That, my friend, is why an apple or a piece of toast or a glass of milk or a potato, — turn out to be deadly poisons, just like all the other forms of speed.

    Sincerly
    -Tom Bunnell

  127. Here is a “Quote from Mark Twain” Darwinian Theory:1909 I have been studying the traits and dispositions of the “lower animals” (so-called) and contrasting them with the traits and dispositions of man….it obliges me to renounce my allegiance to the Darwinian theory of the Ascent of Man from the Lower Animals; since it now seems plain to me that that theory ought to be vacated in favor of a new and truer one, this newer and truer one to be named the Descent of Man from the Higher Animals.

  128. Anonymous says:

    Thank you, Gary, for giving me the ammunition to put my 7 year-old, obese son on a low-carb diet. I have been trying to be “moderate” with him for 2 years and I have come to the conclusion that he just can’t do simple carbs. We are an active, progressive family, but I let him slip into the pasta, pizza and peanut butter and jelly diet.
    Are there other parents out there with insight into this process? We have only been at it for a month, but already he is losing weight and his underweight brother is gaining weight, in a good way. I also wonder if Gary, or anyone else, has any thoughts or references on dehydration. We seem to be consuming a lot of salt and my son’s legs are still bloated.

    I would also love to see Gary write an article about the sociological implications of removing sugar and flour from one’s diet. He hinted at being the Grinch that Stole Christmas. I have been accused of much worse. It drives me nuts that we make a big deal of making sure that our kids tie on a sugar buzz at every birthday party and holiday celebration, yet we act all shocked when they move up to alcohol and and drugs in high school or college.

    • I have a son who actually has written/given college papers and speeches on the way we drug kids with poor diets and pharmaceuticals for the resulting “ADHD,” and then criminalize the use of “illegal” drugs, such as marijuana, which those kids use to “self-medicate.”
      I did not understand the carb/insulin connection until my kids were in their late teens. Happily, they have both adopted low-carb diets in their twenties and are healthy and productive young people. My daughter has conquered weight, depression, and eating disorder issues and my son’s ADHD is well-managed.

    • Anonymous says:

      We eat low carb as a family, including our 2.5 yr old. Our primary health motivation is improving our dental health which it does. When we go to parties and such I loosen things up for my daughter so inevitably she’ll eat some junky food, though I still try to avoid allowing the worst of the worst like soda and candy. This occurs 1x a month or less and the rest of the time we’re eating meat, veggies and select dairy & fruits. 

      Socially, it’s interesting to notice how frequently random people are offering your kid things like juice, candy, cookies, crackers, etc. Luckily, most are polite and ask first. I am polite back and say no thank you :) We actually escaped easter without a single piece of candy being eaten. I’m positive that school situations will be a whole new ball game, however. 

    • Anonymous says:

      Do not doubt that you are doing the right thing for your son!  I believe the bloated legs will take care of themselves (if they haven’t already–I’m kind of late on the scene) as his insulin levels naturally drop.  As insulin levels drop,  the kidneys will begin to excrete salt and, with it, water.  It just takes time.  Eating lots of salt on a low carb diet is fine–we need it to replace the salt the kidneys get rid of. Just drink plenty of water, too!   

  129. Anonymous says:

    Hey Gary,
    The fact that you were invited on the Dr. Oz show says alot about your books. Obviously even the “wrong” (meaning closed minded) people are intriqued, but at the same time, in disbelief of what your book is saying and reporting. You mention in your book that even though there can be strong evidence against a strong belief which people have in their heads, there’s almost nothing you can do to get them to see outside that particular box. Then there is politics as well, as your book details quite nicely. If your thesis had been welcomed and eccepted on the show, then they would have to start the Dr. Oz show from day one and change their approach to the scheme of the show. Ya think they’re going to do that? I don’t think so! That obviously would mean that all the other past Dr. Oz shows, condemning animal fats and promoting high carb diets would be an embarrassment. Of course they would lose all of their sponsors.

    Gary, you’re going to have your followers increasing in numbers everyday. You and the proven scientific information you represent on the association of fats/carbs on heart disease, cancer, obesity, diabetes, dimentia and most other diseases is impeccably written and stands in a class all by itself. There’s no place on any tv show for this astounding information to be mocked by its shows host and producers as well as their sedentary viewers. I found your books from doing research on nutrition through the best source of information in the world, the internet. Not some tv show that’s sponsored by pharmaceutical drugs and the food industry and their various foods not fit for human consumption. If I asked 100% of all my family, friends, relatives and even my clients if they watched the Dr. Oz show, I’m sure 95% or more would say no. If I asked them if they seen my latest video on my website, I’m sure that 95% or more would chk it out because they believe in what I do and the passion I have in what I do. They also understand that I search for the truth and I practice what I preach.

    The point is Gary, you have alot of people right now out there like me who are so passionate about proper nutrition and “correcting” our health issues and the health issues of many others that no tv show on health and nutrition can hold a candle to people like us and the people we teach, and the people they teach and so on. Word of mouth Gary is what you have going for you because of the nature of your book and how compelling the evidence is and how it makes so much more sense than what our doctors, dieticians and nutritionists teach. Your thesis is having a huge effect on alot of us now and will with many more in the future. What you represent is what we respect…..THE TRUTH!!

  130. Razwell says:

    Today is a great day. Gary Taubes’ very vocal attackers , all of whom are uneducated and deeply ignorant very have been publicly and thoroughly debunked.

    It’s safe to say the Caloric Hypothesis is dead. It has no predictive value and is much. much, much too simplistic to explain all the things genuine science has turned up about obesity.

    The Caloric Hypothesis CANNOT explain:

    *Normal weight obesity ,where you appear to be thin or normal weight, but carry around very high levels of body fat ( a very real medical condition the Mayo Clinicc fully recognizes)

    * How and why women fatten and store fat much easier than men, despite eating proportionately LESS calories than men.

    *How and why fat cells behave differently at different sites in the body ( hence extremely stubborn saddle bags)

    *Fuel PARTIONING. How the body PRIORITIZES WHERE it wants to put energy …….. Does it want to put energy into
    the fat mass OR does it want to put energy into the lean muscle mass to be burned? THAT is something the calories in/calories out hypothesis does NOT AT ALL ADDRESS, AND IT IS A CRITICAL FACTOR-POSSIBLY THE CENTRAL FACTOR

    Keep in mind , Dr. Stephan Guyenet , a real scientist, applauds Gary Taubes getting the ball rolling in the right direction and pointoing out the complete failure of the Caloric Hypothesis.

    • Anonymous says:

      Gary Taubes is a real scientist, too.  He has a degree in Physics, I believe.  And Stepan Guynet has recently posted in the comment section of his blog that he doesn’t agree with Gary Taubes’ hypothesis that insulin is the fat storing hormone–in fact, he kind of ridiculed it in one of his replies to a comment.  He has proposed some kind of food reward hypothesis as an alternate hypothesis.  I don’t know what changed Stephan’s mind, but I’m still going with Gary Taubes’ as making the most sense to me as a biochemist.

  131. Anonymous says:

     I have a question. I’m 24 and recently been on the low carb (mainly extremely low intake of carbs such as grains) diet for about a month or so. Each meal i consume a large amount of veggies, fruits and a generous amount of protein. for breakfast sometimes i would have 3 whole eggs along with some nuts and lots of fruits. (i’m 5 foot 7 and weigh around 135 lbs) i consider my physical activity level high as I work out six days a week (a combination of resistance and interval trainings). I’ve been leaner and stronger than I have ever been. However, I stumbled over some articles talking about when we consume low carbs, our body turns to ketone for necessary energy fuel (for both brain and physical activities); keytone then stay in our blood and can cause illness in our joints, some type of diabetes, and several other health problems? sorry I’m not not precise with these medical terms at all. I hope you can understand what my concern is. Thanks!

    • The sources you are reading are confusing ketosis and ketoacidosis, which is a very common mistake. I would expound upon it, but Gary explains it very well on pp. 177-178 of “Why we get fat.”

      • Anonymous says:

        Thanks for your reply. There seems to be so much to learn, and at times it almost seems like we will never master all the knowledges out there within our own bodies…. Here is my another question: besides the weight/cholesterol correction benefits of restricted-carb diet, is our body able to supply our brain with enough carbs for it to develop and function from ketone? In other words, is ketone a efficient source of carbs for our brain to function to its fullest( I don’t mean it like 100% brain development or anything along the line)? and function from ketone? In other words, is ketone a efficient source of carbs for our brain to function to its fullest( I don’t mean it like 100% brain development or anything along the line)?

        • My understanding is that ketones are not related to carbs, but are the by-product of fat metabolism and are the perfect source of fuel for our bodies, and especially for the brain. Low-carbers convert from glucose to ketone burning. The process of converting to using ketones for fuel is in Gary’s book on p. 214
          I am a “die-hard” cyclist and ride thousands of miles a year. I have no problem doing multi-day 55-plus bike rides on my usual low-carb diet. (Except for the challenge of eating on rides that are catered and supplied by people who think that carb-loading is still in vogue).
          I also believe that my cognitive functions are sharper than ever after 11 years of a very low-carb lifestyle.
          I am 58, by the way, and have a strong family history of insulin-resistance that contributed to the poor health and early death of both my father and paternal grandfather. I firmly believe that if I had not changed my lifestyle 11 years ago, I would have by now suffered the same fate.

          • Anonymous says:

             I see. Ya ever since I’ve been on the restricted carb diet (i still do believe in fruits and veggies tho) I feel like I’m in the best shape of my life ever. My performances on the court and in the gym has risen to a different level. If I did not give this diet a shot I would have never understood why I always got so drowsy and feel so burdened after a supposingly-healthy meal. Thank you for your insights!!!

          •  My brother, who of course is genetically very similar to me, was a vegan for an extended period. At one point, he thought he must have chronic fatigue syndrome or a psychiatric disorder and was considering going to a therapist to try to figure out why, as he put it “I wanted to die every afternoon.”
            He started his low-carb regime the same year I did,  January of 2000. Although we approach it in different ways because he is a bit more carb-tolerant than I am, we are both believers and have experienced excellent health and high energy following low-carb lifestyles. Both of my children have converted in the past couple of years. My daughter is crediting low-carb for reversing her depression and allowing her to lose a few pounds easily, as well as being the final key to ending a struggle with bulimea. My son has reduced his ADHD syndromes and is an organic low-carber working at a Whole Foods store and training to be a yoga instructor. We are all so grateful to Gary and his cohorts in the fight to reverse the low-fat mania that has done so much harm to so many. Glad to have you on board.

          • montmorency says:

            I’m glad someone has mentioned depression. How is it possible that this is so widespread and so many people are on anti-depressants? I firmly believe this is yet another disease of civilisation, and if the low-fat/unsaturated fat mantra has not caused it, then it has certainly contributed to it.

            If you like your conspiracy theories neat, here is how it could work:

            First scare the bejasus out of people by demonising fatty meat, possibly the the most healthy thing to eat imaginable.

            Get the population drugged-up on anti-depressants to try to counter the inevitable widespread depression as people feel deprived of what they like and what is good for them, or feel guilty about wanting it.

            Fluoridate the water to further rot the brains of the voters and taxpayers.

            Prescribe statins to continue this process (polypill anyone?)

            Result: one nice, compliant population.

            As Bill Hicks used to say: “Go to sleep America; your government is in control”.

            Too fanciful?  I’m in England but it’s much the same here.

          • montmorency says:

            I’m glad someone has mentioned depression. How is it possible that this is so widespread and so many people are on anti-depressants? I firmly believe this is yet another disease of civilisation, and if the low-fat/unsaturated fat mantra has not caused it, then it has certainly contributed to it.

            If you like your conspiracy theories neat, here is how it could work:

            First scare the bejasus out of people by demonising fatty meat, possibly the the most healthy thing to eat imaginable.

            Get the population drugged-up on anti-depressants to try to counter the inevitable widespread depression as people feel deprived of what they like and what is good for them, or feel guilty about wanting it.

            Fluoridate the water to further rot the brains of the voters and taxpayers.

            Prescribe statins to continue this process (polypill anyone?)

            Result: one nice, compliant population.

            As Bill Hicks used to say: “Go to sleep America; your government is in control”.

            Too fanciful?  I’m in England but it’s much the same here.

        • Paula says:

          CARBS   ARE   NECESSARY   FOR   BRAIN   FUNCTION!!! 

          NOT!
           
          On pp. 456 in GCBC, GT ANNIHILATES THIS MYTH.
           
          “It is not the case, despite public-health recommendations to the contrary, that carbohydrates are required in a healthy human diet.  Most nutritionists still insist that a diet requires 120 to 130 grams of carbohydrates, because this is the amount of glucose that the brain and central nervous system will metabolize when the diet is carbohydrate-rich.  But what the brain uses and what it requires are two different things.  Without carbohydrates in the diet, as we discussed earlier (see page 319), the brain and central nervous system will run on ketone bodies, converted from dietary fat and from the fatty acids released by the adipose tissue; on glycerol, also released from the fat tissue with the breakdown of triglycerides into free fatty acids; and on glucose, converted from the protein in the diet.  Since a carbohydrate-restricted diet, unrestricted in calories, will, by definition, include considerable fat and protein, there will be no shortage of fuel for the brain.  Indeed, this is likely to be the fuel mixture that our brains evolved to use, and our brains seem to run more efficiently on this fuel mixture than they do on glucose alone.  (A good discussion of the rationale for a minimal amount of carbohydrates in the diet can be found in the 2002 Institute of Medicine [IOM] report, Dietary Reference Intakes. The IOM sets an “estimated average requirement” of a hundred grams of carbohydrates a day for adults, so that the brain can run exclusively on glucose, “without having to rely on a partial replacement of glucose by [ketone bodies].” It then sets the “recommended dietary allowance” at 130 grams to allow margin for error. But the IOM report also acknowledges that the brain will be fine without these carbohydrates, because it runs perfectly well on ketone bodies, glycerol, and the protein-derived glucose.)
           
          “Whether a carbohydrate-restricted diet is deficient in essential vitamins and minerals is another issue. As we also discussed (see page 320-26), animal products contain all the amino acids, minerals, and vitamins essential for health, with the only point of controversy being vitamin C.  And the evidence suggests that the vitamin C content of meat products is more than sufficient for health, as long as the diet is indeed carbohydrate restricted, with none of the refined and easily digestible carbohydrates and sugars that would raise blood sugar and insulin levels and so increase our need to obtain vitamin C from the diet. 
           
          “Moreover, though it may indeed be uniquely beneficial to live on meat and only meat, as Vilhjalmur Stefannson argued in the 1920S, carbohydrate-restricted diets, as they have been prescribed ever since, do not restrict leafy green vegetables (what nutritionists in the first half of the twentieth century called 5percent vegetables) but only starchy vegetables (e.g., potatoes), refined grains and sugars and thus only those foods that are virtually without any essential nutrients unless they’re added back in the processing and so fortified, as is the case with white bread.  A calorie-restricted diet that cuts all calories by a third, as John Yudkin noted, will also cut essential nutrients by a third.  A diet that prohibits sugar, flour, potatoes, and beer, but allows eating to satiety meat, cheese, eggs, and green vegetables will still include the essential nutrients, whether or not it leads to a decrease in calories consumed.”
           

  132. Stacy Lu says:

    Per my most recent blood lipids checkup, my LDL was 96; my HDL 104.  I eat a 95 percent plant-based diet, with a little fish now and then.  I do abstain almost totally from sugar and processed carbs, while getting the benefits of the nutrients from fruits and vegetables. So while I do agree with your premise, I’m not sure it’s mandatory to ingest huge amounts of meat and saturated fat to get to a good lipids profile.  Particularly when one takes environmental and ethical considerations into account, if that is a factor.  You probably don’t intend to make it sound mandatory to ingest so much animal protein…but that’s the way it comes across. 

    • It’s a common misconception that eating plant seeds and flesh is a nice, good thing to do, and eating animal flesh a bad thing. Crushing and eating baby plant life embryo’s and life is no better than eating animal life. It’s all brutal and it’s all life. Living things crushed with our teeth and eaten and swallowed and digested. Sometimes alive and sometimes dead is the way of all living things. Plant life is consuming and destroying the earths ecosystem more, not less than animal and fish and bird farming. — It’s a huge dilemma we all face in this destruction of our earth and peoples and all living things.

    • I agree….when he says “low-fat diets are making us fat” it’s assuming that one is replacing fats with refined carbs (simple sugars and starches). While that may be true, it’s not “always” the case (such as with YOU)

    • Nickie Woodward says:

       What kind of LDL and HDL do you have?  ApoA or ApoB?

    • I’m also curious as to what your glucose and triglyceride levels are. Can you please post? Thank you!

    • Paula says:

       GARY TAUBES’ EXCHANGE WITH A VEGETARIAN ON THIS BLOG (how does one explain these good lipid results on the part of Frank Spence?  No sugar?  Obviously high fat, low carb, but where does protein come from and HOW MUCH PROTEIN DOES ONE NEED IN ONE’S DIET?):

      frankjspencejr
       
      Gary, this is spooky. As you know I have also been on the 3 eggs a day, high fat, very low carb diet about 2 years. Just yesterday I had my lipids checked, with almost identical results as yours:T Chol 192, TG 65, LDL-C 114, HDL-C 65.3, VLDL 13, Chol/HDL 2.9Weight staying mid 180s. Thanks again for your good work.
       
      garytaubes
       
      Hi Frank,
      Spooky it is, since you don’t eat any meat at all and I live on it. Nice numbers and nice to hear from you, as ever.
      gt
      Here’s Christopher D. Gardner, PhD – presenting how – unexpectedly — in his A-Z diet study, Atkins beat every other diet in every category (Gardner himself is a vegetarian – he called these findings “a bitter pill to swallow” — GT does mention this study in WWGF):

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eREuZEdMAVo
      HIS VIDEO PRESENTATION OF HOW LOW CARB (HIGH FAT?) BESTED ALL OTHERS IN EVERY CATEGORY:The Battle of the Diets: Is Anyone Winning (At Losing?)

      In light of how well Frank Spence’s vegetarianism has done, lipid-wise, it would be interesting to watch this Gardner presentation again…to see what can be garnered…

    • Paula says:

       GARY TAUBES’ EXCHANGE WITH A VEGETARIAN ON THIS BLOG (how does one explain these good lipid results on the part of Frank Spence?  No sugar?  Obviously high fat, low carb, but where does protein come from and HOW MUCH PROTEIN DOES ONE NEED IN ONE’S DIET?):

      frankjspencejr
       
      Gary, this is spooky. As you know I have also been on the 3 eggs a day, high fat, very low carb diet about 2 years. Just yesterday I had my lipids checked, with almost identical results as yours:T Chol 192, TG 65, LDL-C 114, HDL-C 65.3, VLDL 13, Chol/HDL 2.9Weight staying mid 180s. Thanks again for your good work.
       
      garytaubes
       
      Hi Frank,
      Spooky it is, since you don’t eat any meat at all and I live on it. Nice numbers and nice to hear from you, as ever.
      gt
      Here’s Christopher D. Gardner, PhD – presenting how – unexpectedly — in his A-Z diet study, Atkins beat every other diet in every category (Gardner himself is a vegetarian – he called these findings “a bitter pill to swallow” — GT does mention this study in WWGF):

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eREuZEdMAVo
      HIS VIDEO PRESENTATION OF HOW LOW CARB (HIGH FAT?) BESTED ALL OTHERS IN EVERY CATEGORY:The Battle of the Diets: Is Anyone Winning (At Losing?)

      In light of how well Frank Spence’s vegetarianism has done, lipid-wise, it would be interesting to watch this Gardner presentation again…to see what can be garnered…

  133. Anonymous says:

    Gary - have you watched forks over knives yet? They repeatedly promoted a “whole foods, plant based diet” and were very anti-meat. When you actually looked at what they were eating though, it seemed like a low-carb diet in the main (saw pasta once, but no bread, no sugar and mostly salads). They seem to think you will get cancer due to the excessive protein you eat.

  134. Heather Empey says:

    Hi Gary!  I loved “Why We Get Fat” and it has made a big impact on my life.  You made me believe that I could lose weight again–after being on a low-carb diet, losing weight, getting sucked into the calories in/calories out mentality and then gaining it back again.  Thank you from the bottom of my heart! 
     I wanted to share this recent article from the BBC with you and your readers.  It’s about Mauritania’s so called wife-fattening farms, where they force-feed girls to make them fat and desirable.  While I can’t say that I wasn’t tempted to pack up and move to Mauritania, I do want to point out that they feed the girls what they call “fattening food” such as dates and couscous: carbs of course and not eggs and meat.  One more for your what-really-makes-us-fat file: 

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/3429903.stm

    • CarbSane says:

       Oh I don’t know there Heather:

      “I make them eat lots of dates, lots and lots of couscous and other fattening food,” Fatematou, …

      “I make them eat and eat and eat. And then drink lots and lots of water,” she explained.”I make them do this all morning. Then they have a rest. In the afternoon we start again. We do this three times a day – the morning, the afternoon and the evening.”

      Sounds a lot like inane overeating to me.  Oh, and then drinking lots of water is fattening too?  The “forcing” sounds pretty intense as well.  IOW, the girls are forced to gorge themselves for fear of punishment (beating), left to their own devices they would not overeat the dates and couscous.  The girls MUST overeat to get fat.

  135. Anonymous says:

    Dr. McDougal and other vegan advocates claim to reverse or
    cure type II diabetes just by eliminating all animal products.  Is this at all possible? Or are they leaving
    something out? A friend of mine who went to McDougal keeps saying my low-carb
    diet with animal fats and protein will lead to all sorts of health problems.
     

    • Those sorts of claims seem suspect to me.  As I mentioned in another post here, my brother was a vegan for a fairly extended period and my children have experimented with varying degrees of vegan/vegetarianism all with undesirable results. My family does seem to have a particularly extreme form of insulin-resistance that causes all sorts of issues from obesity to ADHD and eating disorders, to diagnosable “Type II Diabetes” ( a term I don’t like to use). I followed a very low-fat, grain-based diet for 20 years and my insulin-resistance progressed to the point that I suspect I would also have converted to chronic high blood sugar readings that doctors would have called “diabetes.” I have never reached the “magic number” and have had very low fasting blood sugar readings for the past 11 years since making a massive dietary shift to very low-carb. If I tried to eat a plant-based diet, I have no idea what I would eat since my insulin-resistance has not gotten any better and I can get symptoms (I get shaky and hyper and my “skin crawls” in a few minutes, then I go into a brain-fog comatose state an hour or so later) from a single strawberry! My brother switched from vegan to low-carb around the same time and has experienced much improved mental/emotional health and normalized blood sugar/insulin levels.
      So, I just can’t fathom how “Type II Diabetes” can be reversed a diet that is based on foods that are the ones that will raise blood sugar and insulin levels.
      Perhaps Gary will read and comment on this as well as “Forks over Knives” which has been getting quite a discussion going on Huffpo this past week. Articles by T. Colin Campbell and Esselyn always bring us low-carbers out in full force to battle the forces of vegevangelicalism.

  136. Paula says:

    http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/low-carb-library/why-we-get-fat/#more-4454

    RE: 

    (1)  TIREDNESS & SPACEY-HEADEDNESS OF GOING LOW CARB; and
    (2)  ”PROTEIN RAISES INSULIN TOO”

    Dr. Eades, on May 6, put up this review of WWGF – As usual with everything Dr. Eades writes, it’s really intelligent and has a great ending!  Funny!

    No spoilers here, I give you just the beginning of the ending:

    “One of my favorite chapters [in WWGF] is the one titled “The Nature of a Healthy Diet.”  Although you wouldn’t know it from this title, the chapter fairly presents most of the arguments against low-carbohydrate diets and refutes them.  I’m sure many will find these refutations helpful in their dealings with naysayers, who seem compelled to point out non-existent problems with carb-restricted dieting.  There is one in particular that I plan to deploy at the next opportunity.  Since I have my own arguments against the rest of the anti-low-carb idiocy, it annoys me greatly that I didn’t think of this one myself.

    Here is a scenario I often endure at a party or other get together after my identity as a diet book writer and low-carb expert has been revealed:

    Other person, OP (typically an overweight female): I tried a low-carb diet once.

    Me: (Dreading what’s sure to follow.) Oh, really.

    OP: Yes, and it worked for a while, but I couldn’t stick to it.

    Me: Oh, really?  Why not?

    OP: Well, I felt tired and spacey headed….”

    (I leave you to savor the whole review and great ending for yourselves!  Paula)

    But I wanted to add what was for me an important paragraph from Dr. Eades’ review:

    “Some people with a little learning may be quick to point out that PROTEIN DRIVES INSULIN UP AS WELL.  This is true, but with a catch.  Protein drives both insulin and glucagon up, so you don’t have the pure insulin effect.  Only carbs will give you that.  With carbs, insulin goes up while glucagon goes down.  With meat and other proteins, the effects of the elevated insulin are muted by the concomitant rise in glucagon. (Glucagon isn’t called insulin’s counter-regulatory hormone for nothing.)”
     

  137. Paula says:

    http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/low-carb-library/why-we-get-fat/#more-4454

    RE: 

    (1)  TIREDNESS & SPACEY-HEADEDNESS OF GOING LOW CARB; and
    (2)  ”PROTEIN RAISES INSULIN TOO”

    Dr. Eades, on May 6, put up this review of WWGF – As usual with everything Dr. Eades writes, it’s really intelligent and has a great ending!  Funny!

    No spoilers here, I give you just the beginning of the ending:

    “One of my favorite chapters [in WWGF] is the one titled “The Nature of a Healthy Diet.”  Although you wouldn’t know it from this title, the chapter fairly presents most of the arguments against low-carbohydrate diets and refutes them.  I’m sure many will find these refutations helpful in their dealings with naysayers, who seem compelled to point out non-existent problems with carb-restricted dieting.  There is one in particular that I plan to deploy at the next opportunity.  Since I have my own arguments against the rest of the anti-low-carb idiocy, it annoys me greatly that I didn’t think of this one myself.

    Here is a scenario I often endure at a party or other get together after my identity as a diet book writer and low-carb expert has been revealed:

    Other person, OP (typically an overweight female): I tried a low-carb diet once.

    Me: (Dreading what’s sure to follow.) Oh, really.

    OP: Yes, and it worked for a while, but I couldn’t stick to it.

    Me: Oh, really?  Why not?

    OP: Well, I felt tired and spacey headed….”

    (I leave you to savor the whole review and great ending for yourselves!  Paula)

    But I wanted to add what was for me an important paragraph from Dr. Eades’ review:

    “Some people with a little learning may be quick to point out that PROTEIN DRIVES INSULIN UP AS WELL.  This is true, but with a catch.  Protein drives both insulin and glucagon up, so you don’t have the pure insulin effect.  Only carbs will give you that.  With carbs, insulin goes up while glucagon goes down.  With meat and other proteins, the effects of the elevated insulin are muted by the concomitant rise in glucagon. (Glucagon isn’t called insulin’s counter-regulatory hormone for nothing.)”
     

  138. Paula says:

    Did anyone see this article in the May 16th WSJ?

    The Diet That Shook Up Tennis?   Starch Madness: Novak Djokovic’s Domination of the Sport Has Coincided With His Gluten-Free Turn 
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703509104576327624238594818.html#printMode

    You’ll notice low-carb is not mentioned – but as funnyman Richard D. Feinman, M.D. states:
     
    “Carbohydrate restriction has attained the status of the name of G-d in Hebrew:  it’s never pronounced out loud.”
      
    found at 9:00  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIkP-JHOeEk&feature=related
     
    The WSJ articles does depict Djokovic and Federer running around in meat suits; one might well assume low or no sugar is involved because I myself doubt Djokovic would not have been personally investigating diet on the internet… Where he would definitely have come upon “our crowd”… primal, paleo, crossfit, atkins…

  139. SUGAR AND CARBOHYDRATE ADDICTION TURNS OUT TO BE THOUSANDS OF ADDICTIONS, —  NOT JUST ONE!!!
    Gary
    In all of my 66 years of life I have eaten and drank probably several thousand if not several tens of thousands of different combinations of fruits and juices and candies and vegetables and grains and dairy along with my meat and eggs. —  Often blended and eaten with some or all of these sugars and carbohydrates as a snack or meal.

    It’s an interesting view the protein/fat/carbohydrate combinations we all came to love.

    A hotdog or a hamburger or cheeseburger or BLT or steak and baked or a salad with dressing or pie and ice cream, fish and chips or pot roast or chicken and dumplings.

    It goes on forever.

    Millions of combinations and we all became connoisseurs and gourmets with all of these taste delights.

    All addictions to sugars and carbohydrates but most often with meat and fats included for balance.

    We sophisticate wine and alcohol consumption and we sophisticate all of these sugar and carbohydrate substances.

    All stimulant drugs.

    No small wonder the whole  world has fallen into this trap without knowing it and no small wonder how hard it is to break these life long addictions passed on from generation to generation endlessly.
    -Tom Bunnell 

  140. Paula says:

    Here’s the May 17th WSJ:

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704810504576305250845743700.html

    SPUDS, ON THE VERGE OF BEING EXPELLED, START A FOOD FIGHT IN THE CAFETERIA: Federal Plan to Limit Potatoes on School Menus Whips Up Supporters; ‘Gateway Vegetable’

    By JENNIFER LEVITZ And BETSY MCKAY PORTLAND, Maine—

    Around here, you can find “Maine Potato Candy”—mashed potatoes rolled in coconut and dipped in chocolate—and potato donuts. A popular county fair offers wrestling matches in a vat of potatoes. In a state where spuds are the top agricultural product, locals can’t get enough of them, even at schools.

    “We’ve got to have potatoes—our children are used to potatoes,” says Louise Bray, food-service director for Caribou, Maine, public schools. She regularly serves hash browns for breakfast, plus mashed potatoes, “Maine fries,” a baked potato bar and potato puffs for lunch.

    BUT NOW THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT WANTS TO ALL BUT TOSS TUBERS OUT OF SCHOOL.

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is proposing to eliminate the “white potato”—defined as any variety but the sweet potato—from federally subsidized school breakfasts and to limit them sharply at lunch.

    ….

    The proposed change is part of a push to make school meals healthier, with more nutrient-rich vegetables and fewer French fries.

    Under the USDA proposal, school cafeterias would have to limit starchy vegetables such as potatoes, corn, peas and lima beans to a total of one cup per week for lunch….”

    With the USDA set to release final rules in coming months, and put them into effect in the 2012-2013 school year, the National Potato Council in Washington, D.C., is urging the “entire potato industry” to mobilize.  [etc.]

    (Full article at url…)

  141. Paula says:

    AN INTERESTING INTERCHANGE:

    http://forum.lowcarber.org/showthread.php?t=416502 

    “I learned over on Peter’s Blog that Optimal Dieters have been dying of gastrointestinal cancers at a disturbing rate. Recently Adam Jany, president of the OSBO (the Polish Optimal Dieters’ association), died of stomach cancer at 64 after 17 years on the Optimal Diet. Earlier Karol Braniek, another leader of the OSBO, died at 68 from duodenal cancer. “A Polish former Optimal Dieter who has now switched to something closer to the Perfect Health Diet noted that gastrointestinal cancers seem to be common among Optimal Dieters: “The impression we get is that there’s rather high occurrence of gut cancer, including stomach, duodenum, colon … ”
     
    RESPONSE
     
    http://forum.lowcarber.org/archive/index.php/t-419731.html
     
    Nutr Cancer. 2004;48(2):149-59.
    DIET AND STOMACH CANCER RISK IN WARSAW, POLANDLissowska J, Gail MH, Pee D, Groves FD, Sobin LH, Nasierowska-Guttmejer A, Sygnowska E, Zatonski W, Blot WJ, Chow WH.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Cancer Center and M. Sklodowska-Curie Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. lissowsj~coi.waw.plAbstractSome of the world’s highest rates of stomach cancer are found in Poland. Reasons for the increased incidence are not known, but high intake of sausages and other preserved foods and low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables may be involved.
    DIET AND STOMACH CANCER RISK IN WARSAW, POLAND
    Lissowska J, Gail MH, Pee D, Groves FD, Sobin LH, Nasierowska-Guttmejer A, Sygnowska E, Zatonski W, Blot WJ, Chow WH.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Cancer Center and M. Sklodowska-Curie Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. lissowsj~coi.waw.plAbstractSome of the world’s highest rates of stomach cancer are found in Poland. Reasons for the increased incidence are not known, but high intake of sausages and other preserved foods and low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables may be involved.
     
    A case-control study comprising residents newly diagnosed with stomach cancer during 1994-96 and controls randomly selected from the general population was conducted in Warsaw, Poland. Standardized interviews were conducted to ascertain usual consumption of 118 common foods and beverages and other exposures. Using data from direct interviews with 274 cases and 463 controls, odds ratios of stomach cancer were calculated as estimates of risks associated with dietary factors, adjusting for age, sex, education, smoking, and caloric intake. Risk of stomach cancer was inversely related to intake of total fruits and dark green-yellow vegetables and to indices of vitamins C and E and alpha- and beta-carotenes.
     
    However, RISK WAS NOT SIGNIFICANTLY INCREASED AMONG THOSE WITH HIGH INTAKE OF PICKLED/SALTED VEGETABLES AND SAUSAGES. RISKS WERE POSITIVELY ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED INTAKE OF BREADS/CEREALS/RICE/PASTA AND OTHER REFINED GRAINS, AS WELL AS A HIGH CARBOHYDRATE INDEX.
     
    Our findings add to the evidence of a protective effect of fruits and certain vegetables on stomach cancer risk, but do not indicate that high intake of sausage and other preserved foods typical in the Polish diet has contributed to the country’s elevated stomach cancer incidence.
     
    OUR DATA ALSO SUGGEST THAT HIGH CARBOHYDRATE CONSUMPTION MAY INFLUENCE RISK, but further confirmation is needed.

  142. Razwell says:

    This one’s for the commercial dieting industry which rakes in $ 100 billion  a year resting on false promises and assumptions:

    The first law of thermodynamics  HAS  been violated many times – Black Holes. Astrophysicists like Dr. Michio Kaku already know this. The cosmology texts are currently being re- written in light of this new infomation.

    Nothing in science is infallible. Science is a work in progress. 

    The commercial dieting industry is  not scientific at all, and talks with 100 % certitude.

    • Anonymous says:

      The First Law of thermodynamics = conservation of energy = conservation of mass — and black holes do, in fact, obey the First Law.

      They obey the Second Law, too, with black hole entropy proportional to event horizon area, and Hawking radiation shows that they have temperatures consistent with this.

      Gary, BTW, has no quarrel with the First Law itself, only with what nutritionists think that it implies.

  143. Razwell says:

    Gary Taubes’ way of eating is what all the professional natural bodybuilders do. My brother just came in second in the big leagues- the same league the  Mr. Olympia competes in. ( the 170 pound natural division)

    He  had some top IFBB  professionals VERY  favorably  ranking him.

    How does eat? EXACTLY like Gary Taubes recommends. He watches his carbs like a HAWK. I find it intesting that all the bashers  of Gary’s writings have very average builds or overweight  themselves. ( McDonald, Colpo, Aragon, Krieger and CarbSane)

    What have they won? 

    All the  natural bodybuilders are eating this way. There MUST be something to it. They EMPHASIZE CARBS especially.

  144. Anonymous says:

    Congrats on some excellent blood results. What I don’t see here are homocysteine and a PSA. BTW i think the biggest post-Dr Oz Show lesson after listening to your interview with Jimmy is to instead of “being afraid” that you might ruffle a few feathers, focus on your truth/mission/purpose and stand up for yourself and your work. By easily backing down or taking the silent high road (as you do in the clip http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/man-who-thinks-everything-dr-oz-says-wrong-pt-3) in essence you are doing America a great disservice!! 

    My advice for you is to get some professional media training and at least level the playing field. (If it were a boxing match would you train less than your opponent or more?) Well, these TV guys like Dr Oz are media pros (professionally trained) and you need to one up them. Practice your answers to tough questions so when you need it most you are ready – guns blazing!! I implore you to fight back and take a stronger stand!!!  

  145. Anonymous says:

     Congrats on some excellent blood results. What I don’t see here are homocysteine and a PSA. BTW i think the biggest post-Dr Oz Show lesson after listening to your interview with Jimmy is to instead of “being afraid” that you might ruffle a few feathers, focus on your truth/mission/purpose and stand up for yourself and your work. By easily backing down or taking the silent high road (as you do in the clip http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/man-who-thinks-everything-dr-oz-says-wrong-pt-3) in essence you are doing America a great disservice!! 

    My advice for you is to get some professional media training and at least level the playing field. (If it were training for a boxing match would you train less than your opponent or more?) Well, these TV guys like Dr Oz are media pros (professionally groomed and trained and want to protect the interests of their advertisers – big pharma and the food industry in this case) and you need to one up them. Practice your answers to tough questions so when you need it most you are ready – guns blazing!! I implore you to fight back and take a stronger stand!!!  

  146. Anonymous says:

      Congrats on some excellent blood results. What I don’t see here are homocysteine and a PSA. BTW i think the biggest post-Dr Oz Show lesson after listening to your interview with Jimmy is to instead of “being afraid” that you might ruffle a few feathers, focus on your truth/mission/purpose and stand up for yourself and your work. By easily backing down or taking the silent high road (as you do in the clip http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/man-who-thinks-everything-dr-oz-says-wrong-pt-3) in essence you are doing America a great disservice!! 

    My advice for you is to get some professional media training and at least level the playing field if not get the edge. (If you were training for a boxing match would you train less than your opponent or more?) Well, these TV guys like Dr Oz are media pros (professionally groomed and trained and want to protect the interests of their advertisers – big pharma and the food industry in this case) and you need to one-up them. Practice over and over and over your answers to tough questions so when you need it most you are ready – guns blazing!! I implore you to fight back and take a stronger stand!!!  

  147. montmorency says:

    Hello Gary,

    Congratulations on posting these results and the results themselves. Someone mentioned that they showed (among other things) good kidney function. Could you or anyone point out which part of the results apply?

    I have you to thank for basically converting me to low-carb living, after I discovered your various articles and then your book, around end-2007/beginning 2008. I was low-carb for all of 2008, and then very-low-carb/near-zero-carb for most of 2009. I was eating mostly  Beef, some offal, eggs and sometimes cheese, cooking with beef-dripping or butter.

    In the middle of 2009, I went for a blood test. Although I live in Britain, I didn’t use the NHS, but found a private clinic which could do as comprehensive a test as I wanted. It was not cheap, but worth it to be a bit more in control, and crucially to avoid being bossed around by my own doctor into taking statins.

    The results generally were excellent. High HDL. Good HDL to LDL ration. Low Triglycerides. (There was more, but I won’t go into it here). The only slightly worrying thing was that my HbA1c test was a little on the high side. I think it was “the high side of normal” rather than “high”, but even so, this surprised me, on a virtually zero-carb (zero sugar) diet. I should add that before I went low carb in 2007, I was almost certainly in a pre-diabetic state, so this has always been a slight worry – is my blood sugar under control or not?

    In your 2010 online presentation, you referred to the synthesis of glucose from the amino acids metabolised when protein is consumed, and I wondered if this could be a problem for some people, especially those who had a high-blood-sugar level prior to starting a low-carb regime.

    Sadly, I fell off the wagon somewhat during 2010, and have not had a blood test since that one in 2009. In 2011, I have been trying to get back to the very-low-carb ideal, with mixed success. At some point, I will have another blood test, concentrating on HbA1c, and a kidney function test if possible. I have sometimes read dire warnings about kidney function impairment by meat-based diets from extreme vegetarians, so I would like to try to eliminate that worry.

    Thank you for all you have done and continue to do.

    p.s.. Any chance of a lecture tour or media interviews in the UK? We need your message as much as the US does.

    Regards,
    Mike Ellwood, Oxfordshire, England

  148. Razwell says:

    Top notch bodybuilder Scott Abel has a beautiful article on the SUPREME failure of the calories in/calories out nostrum/ Caloric Hypothesis dogma. He knows what Gary Taubes already knows. Namely that the Caloric Hypothesis  a complete failure for explaining obesity, and the current conventional commercial dieting industry advice does NOT work.

    Calorie counting is a complete illusion. Also labeling is inaccurate, being off by as much as 80 %

    Here is the link:

    The Calories Myth

    http://scottabel.blogspot.com/2011/03/calories-myth.html

  149. Zapped says:

    I wanted to thank Gary Taubes for posting his numbers and also share my recent experience, just a few weeks into a low-carb nutrition plan.

    I’m a 50-year-old male living in Austin TX, married with two kiddos, 5’11″, current weight 182lbs. I’ve had elevated triglycerides in previous lipid tests (as high as 294 mg/dL in 2001, 281 in 2009, lower numbers in between) so I was really interested to know what my lipid profile looked like after following the Duke Diet (low-carb plan) Gary outlined in the Appendix of “Why We Get Fat” for the last four weeks. I didn’t plan to have my annual physical until later this summer, so I ordered the test directly from an Internet service and had my blood drawn yesterday morning in a local lab.For context, my previous physicals were
    Mar 2009 – total=173, HDL=41, LDL= 76, trig=281
    Apr 2010 – total=155, HDL=44, LDL= 73, trig=192My new numbers (drawn May 25 2011) were total cholesterol=162 HDL=56, LDL=88, triglycerides=88Yes, my LDL and triglycerides were exactly the same number. These are the highest HDL (“good” lipoproteins) and lowest triglycerides I’ve ever gotten, and my LDL result was well under the 130 that’s considered top of range for those “bad” lipoproteins. Those low triglycerides tell me that I’m not cheating with carbs, even though I am allowing myself about a 1/2-cup of berries (raspberries, blueberries, blackberries) with a little whipped heavy cream & Stevia in the evening. Other test results that are sometimes a concern with low-carb diets (low glucose, high uric acid, low potassium, high serum protein, liver panels getting out of whack) were all in the normal range.I didn’t spring for the VAP test which Gary’s doctor ordered since I was paying for my test out-of-pocket, but for my insurance-covered physical later this summer I’ll definitely request that. I’d like to get confirmation that my LDL is Pattern A, and also to see those apoB100, Lp(a), HDL-2, HDL-3, and VLDL-3 numbers.

    The 2002 article NY Times article “What If It’s All Been A Big Fat Lie” and the 2011 “Is Sugar Toxic?” were real eye-openers for me. Before the South Beach diet became a fad, Big Fat Lie got me started reading the Eade’s book Protein Power, and of course the recent sugar article got a lot of eyeballs pointed toward Dr. Lustig’s Sugar: The Bitter Truth lecture. After reading Why We Get Fat, I went on to do a quick read of Good Calories Bad Calories and now plan to go through it much more deliberately to make sure I’ve got a good handle on the material. The evidence presented in all of these books, articles, and lectures may not yet be mainstream, but the effort to explain these nutritional issues that affect us all is sincerely appreciated.

    Thanks again Gary for all your hard work.

  150. Elna says:

    I have been reading up on Gary Taubes and Micheal Eades and they have inspired me to eat low carb. I have a question though:
    I’ve recently started cutting out all carbs and sugar products and only eat meat, eggs, cheese, veggies, cream and a small amount of berries. My husband is concerned that I am deficient in vitamins and minerals as I don’t eat a lot of leafy greens of vegetables. In a typical day I would consume maybe a 1/2 pepper or 1/3 cucumber or 1/2 tomato with or without a salad.I do take a multi, potassium (3x day), vit C, cal/mag (3x/day), salmon oil, folic and probiotics. Am I getting enough vitamins/minerals?
    thanks

    • Paula says:

      Hi Elna,

      Sounds like you’re doing great!

      GT likes to point out that Vilhjalmur Stefansson (1879-1962), the Canadian artic explorer and ethnologist, ate (for extended periods of time with the Inuit AND under medical observation) JUST MEAT …  for very long periods of time indeed.

      p. 323-4 of Good Calories, Bad Calories, discusses what happened when “Eugene Du Bois and then of his colleagues from Cornell and the Russell Sage Institute of Pathology [oversaw] the day-to-day details of the experiment” which was the study of Stefansson and Karsetn Anderson, a Danish explorer, as they ate only meat for a year:

       ”…vitamin deficiencies did not appear.  Nor did mineral deficiencies, although the diet contained only a quarter of the calcium usually found in mixed diets..”   Stefansson by the way published ‘Not by Bread Alone’ in 1946, Dr. Du Bois wrote the introduction.

      GT makes the point that while fruit (citrus) can cure … what are they called… the diseases sailors get… that that doesn’t mean ONLY citrus can cure them.  Meat only completely staves them off as well.

  151. Elenor says:

    Okay folks, now I’m starting to feel HDL-envy!  Here I’ve been (sorta-mostly) low-carbing along, all thrilled and excited with my really high 84 HDL (132 LDL and 65 trigs) and — and now I’m beginning to think of it as my measly 84…  {sigh}   Good for y’all, and you’re raising my bar.

  152. Elna says:

    Thanks Paula
    On week two on this diet I started exhibiting joint pain, a weird sensation at my knee and upper back. My husband attributed this to potassium deficiency at which point I started taking supplements. I also, undoubtablly did a “carb up” and that seemed to help. I’m on week 5 and no joint pain. Someone mentioned that joint pain and lethargy were just a sign that my body was going into ketosis but since I did a “carb up” I knocked myself out and then went back into low carb kicking myself back in.
    I still feel that I may not be absorbing the vitamins I am supplementing nor the minerals and that my diet isn’t varied/colorful enough (indicating a diet high in nutrients). I want to start a family this summer and I don’t want my diet to interfere with my ability to conceive and keep a pregnancy. Logic tells me that having minimal vegetables isn’t sufficient, but is it?

    • Paula says:

      Hi Elna!  I’m surprised by the joint pain because mine ended with LCHF.  Joint pain seems strongly to correlate with sugar and wheat from what I’ve read (and in my personal experience; also see Mark Sisson).  But the potassium deficiency could be key.  The Dr. Eades recommend four 99 mg tabs a day (OTC potassium); says Potassium Gluconate 595 mg on the front, but 99 [elemental] potassium on the side of the bottle. What do other posters on this blog have to say about vitamins and minerals, the LCHF diet, and pregnancy? I don’t remember who in my “stable” of diet gurus (LCHF) in my database wrote about it, but GETTING pregnant is greatly helped by LCHF; sometimes it’s all it takes when every other avenue has been tried.  Being overweight definitely correlates with having trouble getting pregnant.  Both typical and the IMHO enlightened doctors agree with this.  While pregnant, IT’S WELL KNOWN THAT FOLIC ACID IS KEY (it’s in the big horse-size vits pregnant women absolutely should take; your average obstetrician has his/her patients taking these; it’s common wisdom, for once not screwed up in the typical medical world) FOR PREVENTING SPINA BIFIDA (this folic acid business was discovery of a woman doctor if I remember rightly).  Folic acid is definitely in these big “horse” vits.  I think it’s even recommended that one start taking these big “horse vits” while trying to conceive, not just during the pregnancy. Whether this magnesium recommendation is pregnancy-specific I don’t know, but the Drs. Eades are really big on magnesium (see their “Protein Power Life Plan”); FYI they do a LOT of research of the research (like GT) and have had a huge clinical practice where they’ve seen everything in action, are very into LCHF – I get the real sense they know what they’re talking about.  Dr. Mike Eades also read, like, 3 versions of GCBC while it was being written, so he, his brilliant wife Dr. Mary Dan Eades, and GT are good friends and very much on the same page. Maybe Vit D is important?  You can get that from sunshine (duh)… but if in winter, OTC Vit D-3 is recommended (Vit D-3 is better than the Vit D-2 your doc would prescribe, from what I’ve heard – see what GT says about the Vit D he takes, below in a blog response of his to Jimmy Moore). Hey, why not get a baseline lipid profile?   See where you are with everything. VITAMINS – VIA FRUITS & GREEN VEGGIES?  GT says he eats them ’cause his Mom always told him to.  :-)   And in the short “What you should eat” section in his WWGF, green leafy veggies are there, but they’re not key from all I’ve read, or actually necessary, believe it or not.  Ditto fruit, believe it or not.   As always the key is to NOT have the typical chronically raised insulin levels one gets with the SAD (standard American diet).   Linus Pauling (and currently, Thomas Levy, M.D. who following Pauling) was a HUGE proponent of Vit C.  But Pauling was working in a paradigm of the usual high carb diet.   LOOK  WHAT  TAUBES  HAS  UNEARTHED  ABOUT   VIT   B   AND   C (and A and D): The key pages in GCBC are pp.  322, 325 & 456.   As GT puts it on p. 325 of GCBC, “Glucose and vit C compete in this cellular-uptake process, like strangers trying to flag down the same cab simultaneously.  Because glucose is greatly favored in this contest, the uptake of Vit C by cells is ‘globally inhibited’ when blood-sugar levels are elevated…”  “IN OTHER WORDS, THERE IS SIGNIFICANT REASON TO BELIEVE THAT THE KEY FACTOR DETERMINING THE LEVEL OF VIT C IN OUR CELLS AND TISSUES IS NOT HOW MUCH OR LITTLE WE HAPPEN TO BE CONSUMING IN OUR DIET BUT WHETHER THE STARCHES AND REFINED CARBS IN OUR DIET SERVE TO FLUSH VIT C OUT OF OUR SYTEM, WHILE SIMULTANEOULSY INHIBITING THE USE OF WHAT VIT C WE DO HAVE.  We might get scurvy because we don’t faithfully eat our fruits and vegetables, but it’s not the absence of fruits and vegetables that causes  the scurvy; it’s the presence of the refined carbs.” I really really really recommend reading the full info on pp. 322, 325 & 456 re vitamins.

  153. Paula says:

    Hi Elna!  I’m surprised by the joint pain because mine ended with LCHF.  Joint pain seems strongly to correlate with sugar and wheat from what I’ve read (and in my personal experience; also see Mark Sisson’s blog).  But the potassium deficiency could be key.  The Dr. Eades recommend four 99 mg tabs a day (OTC potassium); says Potassium Gluconate 595 mg on the front, but 99 [elemental] potassium on the side of the bottle.
     
    What do other posters on this blog have to say about vitamins and minerals, the LCHF diet, and pregnancy?
     
    I don’t remember who in my “stable” of diet gurus (LCHF) in my database wrote about it, but GETTING pregnant is greatly helped by LCHF; sometimes it’s all it takes when every other avenue has been tried.  Being overweight definitely correlates with having trouble getting pregnant.  Both typical and (if I may say) enlightened doctors agree with this.
     
     
     
    While pregnant, IT’S WELL KNOWN THAT FOLIC ACID IS KEY (it’s in the big horse-size vits pregnant women absolutely should take; your average obstetrician has his/her patients taking these; it’s common wisdom, for once not screwed up in the typical medical world) FOR PREVENTING SPINA BIFIDA (this folic acid business was discovery of a woman doctor if I remember rightly).  Folic acid is definitely in these big “horse” vits.  I think it’s even recommended that one start taking these big “horse vits” while trying to conceive, not just during the pregnancy.
     
    Whether this magnesium recommendation is pregnancy-specific I don’t know, but the Drs. Eades are really big on magnesium (see their “Protein Power Life Plan”); FYI they do a LOT of research of the research (like GT) and have had a huge clinical practice where they’ve seen everything in action, are very into LCHF – I get the real sense they know what they’re talking about.  Dr. Mike Eades also read, like, 3 versions of GCBC while it was being written, so he, his brilliant wife Dr. Mary Dan Eades, and GT are good friends and very much on the same page.
     
    Maybe Vit D is important?  You can get that from sunshine (duh)…
     
    I’d recommend getting a baseline lipid profile.
     
    Green veggies?  GT says he eats them ’cause his Mom always told him to.  And in the short “What you should eat” section in his WWGF has them, but they’re not key from all I’ve read, or actually necessary, believe it or not.
     
    If I were able to do my 2 pregnancies over again (had my babies in the early 1990s), I’d definitely do LCHF (no sugar, no hydrogenated veg oils like corn oil – and none of the sainted canola oil either) with coconut oil (saturated fat is good for you), olive oil, GT says peanut oil is good too… I’d probably make sure I took cod liver oil.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    SURVEY  RE  PREGNANT  PATIENTS  CURTAILING  WEIGHT  GAIN
    pp. 407 of GCBC
     
                “As Craddock reported at the [1968] conference, he had recently completed a survey of a hundred pregnant patients, sixty of whom had begun to fatten excessively during the early months of their pregnancy.  ‘This weight gain was controlled in most cases’ – fifty-seven of the sixty – ‘simply by restricting carbohydrates in the diet,’ he said.”
     
     
     
    MATERNAL WEIGHT, INFANT WEIGHT & FUTURE ADULT WEIGHT 
    pp. 401-403 of GCBC
     
    “It is now clear that the roots of this epidemic are evident even in infants and in the birth weights of newborns.   Among middle-income families in Massachusetts, for example, as a team of researchers led by Matthew Gillman of Harvard reported last year [2006? Paula], the prevalence of excessively fat infants increased dramatically between 1980 and 2001.  This increase was most conspicuous among children younger than six months of age.  [Dr. Lustig goes into this in detail in ‘Sugar:  the Bitter Truth” on YouTube which now has 1,355,397 hits – 26,600 hits more than one week ago; I’m keeping track!  Paula]
     
    “The probable explanation is that as women of childbearing age get heavier and more of them become diabetic, they pass the metabolic consequences on to their children through what is known technically as the intrauterine environment.  The nutrient supply from mother to developing child passes across the placenta in proportion to the nutrient concentration in the mother’s bloodstream.  IF THE MOTHER HAS HIGH BLOOD SUGAR, THEN THE DEVELOPING PANCREAS IN THE FETUS WILL RESPOND TO THIS STIMULUS BY OVERPRODUCING INSULIN-SECRETING CELLS.  
     
    ‘THE BABY IS NOT DIABETIC,’ EXPLAINS BOYD METZGER, who studies diabetes and pregnancy at northwestern university, ‘BUT THE INSULIN-PRODUCING CELLS IN THE PANCREAS ARE STIMULATED TO FUNCTION AND GROW IN SIZE AND NUMBER BY THE ENVIRONMENT THEY’RE IN.  SO THEY START OVER-FUNCTIONING.  That in turn leads to a baby laying down more fat, which is why the baby of a diabetic mother is typified by being a fat baby.’
     
    “This is also the most likely explanation for WHY CHILDREN BORN TO WOMEN WHO GAIN EXCESSIVE WEIGHT DURING PREGNANCY ALSO TEND TO BE FATTER.  As Laura Riley, medical director of labor and delivery at Massachusetts General Hospital, told the Boston Globe in response to the Harvard study, she now tells her patients, ‘If you overdo it during pregnancy, you’re setting yourself up for a bigger baby,’ and that, in turn, means ‘YOU ARE SETTING YOUR BABY UP FOR POTENTIALLY A LIFETIME OF WEIGHT PROBLEMS.’  Gillman and his colleagues described the problem this way:  ‘Our observation of a trend of increasing weight among young infants may portend continued increase in childhood and adult obesity.’
     
    “But if fatter mothers are more likely to make fatter babies, and fatter babies are more likely to make fatter mothers, which is also a well-documented observation, then this is another vicious cycle.  It suggests that, once a generation of adolescents and adults start eating the highly refined carbohydrates and sugars now ubiquitous in our diets, even their children will feel the effect, and perhaps their children’s children as well.  The extreme instance of this phenomenon today is the Pima Indians, whose incidence of diabetes is among the highest of any population in the world.  In 2000, NIH investigators reported that Pima born to mothers who were diabetic have a two- to three-fold increased risk themselves of becoming diabetic as adults, and so have a two- to three-fold increased risk of passing diabetes on to their own children – of ‘perpetuating the cycle,’ as the NIH investigators explained.  The ‘vicious cycle’ of the ‘diabetic intrauterine environment,’ they wrote, can explain much of the post-World War II increase in Type 2 diabetes among the Pima, and may also as the NIH investigators explained.  The ‘vicious cycle’ of the ‘diabetic intrauterine environment,’ they wrote, can explain much of the post-World War II increase in Type 2 diabetes among the Pima, and may also ‘be a factor in the alarming rise of this disease nationally.’
     
                “The question we now face is whether the same vicious cycle may also be a factor in the alarming rise of obesity nationally, as well as internationally.  THERE’S NO REASON TO THINK THAT THE HORMONAL AND METABOLIC CONSEQUENCES OF HIGH BLOOD SUGAR – from what James Neel in 1982 called the ‘excessive glucose pulses that result from the refined carbohydrates/over-alimentation of many civilized diets’ – DO NOT PASS FROM MOTHER TO CHILD THROUGH THE INTRAUTERINE ENVIRONMENT, WHETHER THE MOTHER IS CLINICALLY DIABETIC OR NOT.  If so, the longer the obesity epidemic continues, and the longer we go without unambiguously identifying the causes of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes, the worse this vicious cycle is likely to get.”
     
     

  154. Paula says:

    HI 
     

  155. Paula says:

    HI

  156. Paula says:

    Sorry, can’t figure out how to delete a post, so I put in the word HI :-0

  157. Anonymous says:

    As usual CarbSane blocks  me.  I saw her latest article.

    While the law of the conservation of energy is true about conventional matter ( although Black Holes violate it all the time) , the wrong headed and misguided  EXTRAPOLATION of that scientific law by the commercial diet industry to simply “eat  less and move more”  to lose FAT TISSUE  REMAINS UNPROVEN.

    Dr. Linda Bacon  has said many times “eat less, move more” is scientifically UNPROVEN  fat loss advice long term.

    You have no counter argument, CarbSane. The top scientists in the world contradict you. Calorie labels are off by  ALOT more than your number   try as much as 80 %  ( cheese curls)  and 25 – 30 % for potato chips. Dr. Friedman pointed this out in his lecture.

    You have a BIOLOGICAL  system which COUNTS calories for you. It operates with 99.6% precision. Studies from all around the world demonstrate this.  Look up Dr. Jeffrey Friedman , people. he ADMITS  eat less move more is a nostrum UNPROVEN and INEFFECTIVE for the treatment of obesity.

    You’re just an Internet yahoo with a  chip on your shoulder, grossly misinformed about obesity. Look toward genuine science, everyone.

    Look at the FAILURE of bariatric surgery. They eat 700 calories a day and STILL  fat……..  They are VICTIMS of bad advice.

    Intelligent people MOVE ON from eat less move more and look toward recent advancements in medical science  to guide them , as Dr. Friedman recommends……..

    This is what happens when you pit BELIEF systems vs SCEINCE.

  158. Matthew Ward says:

    You should do a blog post on Mark Bittman’s recent NYTimes blog post “Hooked on Meat”. It seems to contain some misinformation and lots of comments are citing things like the China Study to support that meat eating is bad. I know you can’t go around policing everything ever written on nutrition, but I’d like to see a response since Mark Bittman is so widely read.

  159. Anonymous says:

    Having given the Duke diet a try for a couple of months now and seen a weight loss  of a couple of pounds per week, I can say it seemed to make a significant change.  Now that I try to avoid carbohydrates on the no go list as suggested, I am amazed at how it seems the whole world does not want to accept that we can limit carbohydrates.  The food industry and food stuffs that are out there, put relentless and tremendous pressure to consume carbs from pasta to flour based foods to spuds, to sugars, ad nauseum,   And here I was fanatical on fibre and carbs from a load of porridge and oat bran every morning to low fat brown foods, no meats, etc. 

  160. Caleb McVey says:

    Hi All, 

    Thanks for the post. Gary, I’ve read WWGF & am currently finishing GCBC. Began a low-carb diet two weeks ago due to your writing. Staying below 20g net carbs daily. The first week went well; however, I have lost no weight (and gained none) during week two. I periodically check my urine for ketones (I’m a nurse so I can get the strips at work) and am still testing positive. 

    Any thoughts on why I may have stalled in week two? I have not started a regular exercise program at this time, but I’m still fairly active. I have a significant amount of weight to lose so I do not think it related to an already low body fat percentage, etc. Thoughts? 

  161. Anonymous says:

    Caleb, Gary is a science journalist, not a dietician or medical doctor. I suggest you research any of the low-carb forums or blogs online (there are dozens), such as the Atkins community or About.com, where you will find a great deal of information on low-carb weight loss. Off the top of my head, not everyone loses a great deal of weight in two weeks, and weight loss often is not constant. Concentrate on changing your food habits permanently, because if you treat it like a temporary diet the weight will come back.

  162. Anonymous says:

    Have you  responded to Anthony Colpo’s blog post of April 27, 2011? I don’t mention it to challenge you, only that Colpo did a very well-referenced takedown of The China Study. It may be that there have been no real low-carb diets tested, or that other variables may affect the studies he quotes, but I would be very interested in your take on his post. (He seems perpetually pissed off; maybe he works out too much.)

  163. We “self sabotage” this diet a thousand different ways in order to get back to carbohydrates and not have to reduce them further and further, as we detoxify and remove them from our systems. Our addictions lead us on. — We will find a medical/health reason to keep indulging carbohydrates. All of the “prove this, prove that”, and all of the compounded science and theory and analysis and discussion, make for a great smoke screen and detouring and distraction. We throw up our arms and walk away. This is not metaphysical, this is fact. — We will never prove our carbohydrate addictions wrong. — Never. — To death do us part and probably an early grave! Cigarettes, alcohol, caffeine, drugs, gambling, carbohydrates, others. — Substances and behaviors we come to love and rely on. — It’s our comfort zone. It’s like cutting off our arms and legs to try to remove them. — The pain and the suffering and the withdrawal symptoms are too great. Disguised or not! — We emotionally go crazy and we are not going to let that happen.

    We would be suffering for months and months on end.

    Exercise, exercise, then you get to eat carbohydrates!  – Cut the fat and you will make the good even better!  – Except now, you are no longer satiated and will go back to carbohydrates. It’s like a “Panther, in the night”.

    Carbohydrate addictions.

  164. Razwell says:

    In support of Gary Taubes’ excellent  insulin research, I wanted to point out that scientists feel we now have solid evidence that insulin is directly involved in the brain’s reward circuitry.

    Insulin is a MAJOR player in the development of the extremely complex phenomenon of obesity.

  165. Anonymous says:

    Colpo himself is an example of Lustig’s “endurance atheletes” who can actually use carbohydrates at the level of up to 500 g per day.  Nobody probably works out as much as he does.

    Anyone see Oz’s program “Carbs, the New Cocaine?” Guess what his solution is? Behavior modification through exercise, sex, hugs, pets, dealing with “emotional issues” around food, enlisting other people to come between you and that “second or third bagel” and substituting whole-wheat bread and pasta for white. Don’t cut out carbs completely, oh no–that might make you feel bad. Not a single mention of increasing protein and/or fat to assuage insulin-driven hunger. The three obese women he interviewed as “carb addicts” are likely to remain fat and addicted following this “cure.” He’s obviously trying to have it both ways, to jump on the low-carb bandwagon without giving up his corporate sponsors (or admitting Gary is right).

    • Paula says:

      You write, “The three obese women he interviewed as “carb addicts” are likely to remain fat and addicted following this “cure.” “   Take a look at Dr. Oz’s main patient, Oprah, not to mention Dr. Oz’s own wife (knock-down drop-dead gorgeous, and quite overweight).  Google Image her.  (sorry, mea culpa, aka “Meow!”)

  166. Anonymous says:

    Science Diet shows the link between cancer tumors and diet http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110614115037.htm .  Interesting article! It matches what Gary wrote about in GCBC.  I really believe his book opened the way for the real scientists to speak up about what the science actually shows.

    Also, just remember there is a fly-in-the-ointment for low-carb diets if you are sensitive to Arachidonic Acid. See Protein Power for more information, this forum exhange talks about it http://www.proteinpower.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4295 .  I am sensitive, and need to avoid egg yolks and red meat.  As my body generates a rash when I eat either, I’m not sure the one poster is correct about red meat not being a trigger.  My big concern is the inflammation in the arteries.  For several years, my only high lab result number was CRP.  It dropped when I went away from egg yolks and red meat, but still stayed on a low carb diet. 

  167. Centinel says:

    OK, good results, Gary. But, can you refute this post, specially the studies about live expectancy?
    http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/index.php/why-we-get-fat/

  168. Centinel says:

    Hi, Gary.
    In your excellent last book you say that every night we burn fat throught a ketosis process, becouse after a few hours glucose is finished . Is that really true? When I have changed my diet to low carb, ketone bodies appeared in my blood test. But when I return to “normal” diet, ketone bodies aren’t present in the test, and I always extract blood in the morning, after the last dinner and without have a breakfast (so with 12 or 14 hours of starvation)

  169. Donna Morley says:

    im from a group of “healers” seeing how most doctors is we keep a eye on everyones reaserch. even dr oz, but when we saw the ep. i think dr oz wint into the new diet to hard. he just jumped ito it so his body,after eating like he does for as long as he does, reacted. i must say, seeing the resalts are public here, are head ‘healers” looked at it. i hope you dont mind gary. must say, not bad resolts.are group thinks your onto something here.

  170. Priscilla says:

    I wish people would stop using the word ‘carbs’ for, I presume, starches.  Why not call them appropriately fiber and starches?

  171. Anonymous says:

    Actually, I think the comments pretty clearly took down the post.

  172. james says:

    Dear Gary Taubes,
    I would like to thank you for writing your two books on diet/nutrition. I have read both of them and they are very impressive. Your major book -published here in the UK as The Diet Delusion was literally the first thing I saw when I went to my local public library to check out the possibility of going on a diet myself. I had always thought of diets as fads and gimmicks but that was a lucky day; both from the point of my own health and for the sheer pleasure of reading a huge and authoratitive work on the history of diet and the development of scientific consensus. It was good to see the references to the many German and some British scientists researching the topic in the early to mid C20. Perhaps Prof Keys’ reputation will not be maintained.  I don’t read much about the history of science but in terms of quality I was reminded of Richard Rhodes’ book on the history of the atom bomb.

     I see that you have won awards as a science journalist. I have a feeling that you should be nominated for an award relating to the public understanding of science and/or public health. 

    At 63 I was and still am considerably overweight for my 6 foot height, but on June 1, 2011 I started a low carb diet similar to the one you mention in Why we Get Fat. I   bought that one and it was money well spent!

     Since June 1 I have lost 11 pounds and am likely to lose more.

    I had always thought that dieting must be a horrible experience .But this has not been the case. The advice I would give to someone thinking of going onto a low carb diet would be to understand the principles involved. Your books helped me to understand and internalize those principles and I shall always be grateful.

    Best wishes,
    James Holland 

  173. Rebecca Mohr says:

     Thank you for a great article about sugar! The more I read about that subject the more convinced I am that it has been the right decision to eliminate sugar (and most carbohzdrates) from my diet! I have just been diagnosed with altered cells in my cervix which basically means pre-cancer. I have a biopsi scheduled in a month in order to verify the diagnosis but am very optimistic that by not eating sugar I am not giving any fuel to those pre-cancerous cells and that everything will turn out just fine!
    Thanks again for your work! I am very new at this kind of diet and have not read your book yet. But I am certainly going to do so as son as I can manage to get it here (in Norway).
    Keep up the god work and don’t let ignorant people like Dr. Oz discourage you! I used to watch the show but after having seen how he treated and tried to ridicule you (luckily he just ridiculed himself) I will definitely stop watching!!
    Looking forward to reading “Why we get fat”!!!

  174. This is the most powerful website that exists in the world today of low carb. — This and Dr. Jay  Wortman’s “My Big Fat Diet” website are the same epitome of brains and balance and non-selfish attitude and observance. — These sites are prime indicators of the state of the world as regards sugars and hybrid carbohydrate consumption and marketing, advertising and farming of same! — Great work!

  175. Zapped says:

    Hi Priscilla – I’m not quite sure what your objection is here, but let me explain what I think we mean when we refer to “carbs”. 

    There are three macronutrients that compose our human diet – protein, fat, and carbohydrates. Speaking in layman’s terms, carbohydrates can be classified as simple (e.g. sugars), complex (e.g. starches), and fiber. We don’t readily digest fiber, so when we’re concerned with the impact of carbohydrates listed on nutrition labels on our insulin and blood sugar levels, we subtract off the dietary fiber from the total carbohydrate count.

    When I say I’m trying to minimize “carbs” in my diet, I meant that I’m trying to minimize my consumption of both sugar and starches but I can basically consume as much fiber as I like.

    Hope that helps,
    - Jim in Austin TX

  176. Frank Aieta says:

    Hi Gary, I’m a naturopathic physician practicing in Connecticut and I recommend your books to all my patients so they understand better the importance of a low carb diet.  In looking over your blood results I did notice that your carbon dioxide levels were a little low.  The significance of this is actually nutritional in nature.  Low Co2 indicates that the B-vitamin thiamine may be deficient.  I did notice that you are a blood type A as well.  Blood type A’s tend to under produce stomach acid and may require more thiamine and zinc to produce adequate amounts.  Stomach acid is essential for proper digestion and absorption of your nutrients.  Some common indicators that I see in my practice in people that have a thiamine deficiency are the following:  muscle cramps on exertion, sleepy after meals, especially high carb meals, swelling in the ankles especially at night, lower blood pressure, hypoglycemia, carbohydrate sensitivity, and improvement in digestion with taking betaine HCL supplementation.  You should try taking a good high potency b-complex vitamin maybe twice a day with food.  If you notice that you have a harder time digesting larger portions of meats then you should try supplementing with some betaine HCL, maybe a few capsules at the beginning of a meal.  I hope you are not offended by me commenting on your blood results but as a holistically oriented doctor those markers stood out to me and I figured I’d give you a heads up.  Thank you for your great books and all the research you did to write them.
    Dr. Frank Aieta, ND

  177. If we were to discover two identical planets just like the earth in every way and very visible to us because they just magically appeared in the sky one day and were closer than the moon to us, so we could visit and walk around these earths because they are mirror images of our planet earth except that one had developed farming and hybreeding and processing of sugars and carbohydrates and alcohols and the other one didn’t..

    That’s what you got going on here folks.

  178. One is before white mans invasions and the other one, after!

    A pristine earth.

  179. Paula says:

    FYI Looks as if Robert Lustig’s famous YouTube video (Sugar:  The Bitter Truth) will log 1,500,000 hits today.  Gary Taubes mentions in his “Is Sugar Toxic?” NYT Magazine cover article of 4/13/11 that Dr. Lustig’s site had 800,000 hits…  When GT’s article actually appeared (as opposed to when GT wrote about the 800,000 hits), the site had almost a million hits.  But after GT’s article, hits went astronomical (when a friend forwarded me the link to Sugar:  The Bitter Truth back in the Spring of 2010, it had around 250,000 hits).

    Lustig is a big player in this, an important ally; we and the world owe him bigtime.

    DR. LUSTIG INTERVIEWED ON TV
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHoIDMOB-_A&feature=related

    ANOTHER LUSTIG INTERVIEW
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4D3LB8oNKs&NR=1

    That said, and altho Lustig finally agreed to appear on Jimmy Moore’s low-carb show last year after originally turning him down, and as much as Lustig hates sugar, he has no opinion one way or the other about low carb because its efficacy “hasn’t been proven by clinical trials.”  He doesn’t say he’s against low carb — he just wants to see the proof.

    Fair enough – or is it?

    Dr. Lustig gets very in-depth in his YouTube video (if I remember correctly) about leptin and ghrelin as signaling factors of satiety, and hence implicates them big-time in the “bads” of sugar consumption.  Missing the forest for the trees by NOT mentioned carbs’ HUGE impact and importance.

    Read GT in GCBC, p. xxiii where — for the only time in the book (except for p. 463 in the Afterword where “ghrelin” is unfortunately mispelled which is probably why that page’s mention of it didn’t make it into the Index) – GT mentions leptin and ghrelin (with a very interesting parallel discussion of cancer). 

    GT ENDS his mention of leptin and ghrelin on p. xiii by asking “IN THIS CASE, IF REFINED CARBOHYDRATES AND SUGARS ARE INDEED THE REASONS WHY WE FATTEN…AND IF OUR GOAL IS TO PREVENT OR REMDY THE DISSORDER, THE SALIENT QUESTION IS WHY ANY DEEPER EXPLANTAION, AT THE MOMENT, IS NECESSARY.”

    Exactly!  GT has common sense throughout (thank you Occam!) and by means of it, gets to the bottom of things.  Isn’t sidetracked.

    A reread of pp. 463-464 of the 2008 edition of GCBC is about how NOT to be sidetracked re ghrelin, etc.  It’s the great passage about “if you’re hit over the head with a hammer…”

  180. Just got my lab results back. I insisted on a a VAP particle analysis which the Dr. argued against and said it was not routine. The lab techs had trouble figuring out how to order it, but eventually did. The Dr. was pretty sure I would have to pay for the extra tests out-of-pocket (I haven’t received the bill yet).
    My results look very much like Gary’s, except that my total LDL (even the actual LDL of 115) is a bit higher as are are my triglycerides (75) The LDL particle analysis is identical. My only disappointment is that my HDL is much lower than it used to be. I once I had a reading of 110 and my last reading was 89. (Of course, this meant my total cholesterol was lower, which I suppose made my Dr. happy. She doesn’t bother discussing my cholesterol with me because “I refuse to do anything about it. LOL). This time, my HDL was 72. I am mystified as to why it fell so much. Any ideas? I am a 58-year-old post-menopausal woman who has been on a very low-carb diet for 11 1/2 years. I am extremely insulin-resistant. I exercise fairly strenuously. I don’t think much changed in my life in the past year, except some job-related stress. ???

  181. Paula says:

    Two posts on what Hyperlipid (“Petro Dobromylskyj, always known as Peter”) eats:

    http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/search/label/What%20do%20I%20eat%3F%20%281%29

    http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/search/label/What%20do%20I%20eat%3F%20%282%29%20recipes

    GT thanks him (among others) at the end of WWGF.  Peter also posts on what he feeds his little one:

    “Hmmm…having fed my infant raw cow’s milk and egg yolks from 3 months on, followed by grassfed pureed meats (cooked, sorry to the raw paleo crowd), I can tell you that humans are little carnivores! Meat and green veggies swimming in raw pastured butter is dinner most nights now. He’s 4 and has only had one cold so far, no dental caries. Seems to be working for us!”

    http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2011/04/first-meat.html

  182. Anonymous says:

    I’m dissappointed and pleased by your decision to “reveal” yourself in the Truth Tube Test!  Maybe I’ll make my GP happy and go for my lipid profile too.  BUT part of me wishes you had stuck by your convictions that serum cholesterol is BUNK.

    I’ve been a fan since Good Cals-Bad Cals but am reading Why we get Fat for the first time.  I wish you had not used the pictures of the Angus steer or bull (can’t tell in the photo) and the Jersey cow in your example of bovines bred with a different purpose.  I get your point but as a producer of 100 % grass-fed Lowline Angus beef cattle it makes me cringe because it undermines your credibility unnecessarily.  The male bovine doesn’t have a huge udder because he is not a COW!

  183. Anonymous says:

    Please, can someone explain how we can get enough potassium on a low carb diet?  Thank you.

  184. Anonymous says:

    Can you please explain how we get enough potassium on a low carb diet?  Thank you.

    • Paula says:

      I like

      (1)  the avocado recommendation from a poster on this blog (much better source than bananas ’cause bananas are very high sugar and NOT on the LCHF diet list); and

      (2)  Dr. Mike Eades and his wife, Dr. Mary Dan Eades, always put their patients on 400 mg of potassium a day (you get 400 mg of elemental potassium a day by consuming four 595 mg tabs of Potassium Gluconate – each tab has 99 mg of elemental potassium).

      THE ONLINE ANSWER FOR SOURCES OF POTASSIUM IN LOW CARB DIETS:

      “Avocado, brocolli, spinach.

      “Other high potassium low carb foods include:

      “4 oz beef (sirloin) 495 mg 4 oz
      grilled salmon – 480 mg
      1 cup chopped chicken breast meat – 358 mg
      2 Tablespoons tomato paste – 342 mg
      1 3X3” Miracle Brownie – 333 mg (chocolate is high in potassium)
      1 cup raw cauliflower – 303 mg
      2 T peanut butter – 240 mg”

  185. CraigsList Seller says:

    I’m 50, male, 5’10″.  I read WWGF and started following the diet about 3 months ago.  I feel much better and lost about 5lbs.  I was fluctuating between 165-170 but now I fluctuate between 160-165.  I had labs after about 3 months on the diet and I was a bit disappointed:

    Aug2010 labs (pre-low-carb):
    HDL=52; LDL=85;TRI=68;VLDL=15

    June2011 labs (post-low-carb):
    HDL=59;LDL=119;TRI=68;VLDL=14

    So the triglycerides and VLDL are unchanged and can be ignored. But I was expecting less of a jump in the LDL and more of a jump in the HDL  Now, I’ve only been eating this way for 3 months.  Has anyone noticed improved figures after the 3-month point, or this about all I can expect?

    • Paula says:

      Hi GLS –

      YOU STARTED OUT AT A GOOD PLACE:

      Except possibly for HDL, before going low carb, you started OUT healthy, at a good weight with good lipid numbers, including your LDL. And LDL doesn’t matter, it’s the sub-particles (VLDL in this case) that do matter, and there you’re doing well.

      As for HDL: My HDL started the same as yours: 52. In 1-1/2 years, it has reached 67.

      At least in women, GT’s book GCBC states for those age 50 and over, HDL is absolutely THE most important lipid factor correlating to heart attack risk (HDL should be 65 or over). You have had a significant HDL uptick in just 3 mos. and I’m sure it will rise further if my own HDL improvement is any indicator. See my 3 blood results below to see the uptick as it happened.

      As for your worry about LDL, mine is quite a bit higher than yours, but see p.172 of GCBC which is about how LDL as a 3-digit number is simply NOT important. Within the LDL, it’s the VLDL (a sub-particle measurement of LDL) and/or the apo-B result which matters. P. 172 begins: “Kwiterovich and Sniderman then collaborated with Krauss on the last of his three papers on the heterogeneity of LDL. In 1983, they reported that the disproportionate elevation in the apo B protein in heart-disease patients was due to a disproportionate elevation in the amount of the smallest and densest of the low-density lipoproteins [meaning VLDL – Paula]. This explained what Krauss had set out to understand: why two people can have identical LDL-cholesterol levels and yet one develops atherosclerosis and the other doesn’t – why LDL cholesterol is only a marginal risk factor for heart disease.”

      I’m 56 (55 at the time of first two lipid results), female, 5’8”

      MY NUMBERS AS THEY IMPROVED:

      Jan2010 labs (pre-low carb high fat – WEIGHT 168)
      HDL=52; LDL=156; TRI=105

      March2010 READ GCBC COVER TO COVER, HUBBY & I WENT FROM S.A.D. TO LCHF WITH A VENGEANCE (full compliance, except for a number of months we still ignorantly ate white stuff in the form of “low-carb” wraps and bought “CarbQuik” instead of Bisquik; but this turned out to transitional because ultimately you don’t want the white stuff since your body stops craving it, and the more you read, the worse you find out this white stuff is, no matter how labeled as low carb; I’m of course including in the “white stuff” we gave up (which included rice), the “yellow stuff” made with corn, such as chips… Also ditched ‘whole grain’ since grain in whatever form is major buddies, as in BFF, with insulin.)

      Sept2010 labs (post-low carb high fat – WEIGHT 152)
      HDL=65; LDL=159; TRI=54; (didn’t test for VLDL but Apo B was 98 with reference range 50-130)

      July2011 labs (even more post-low carb high fat – WEIGHT 152)
      HDL=67; LDL=158; TRI=48

      IMPROVING ONE’S HDL WHILE LOSING MORE WEIGHT:

      Dr. Eades in his blog at http://www.proteinpower.com has a new entry about jump-starting weight loss for those of us doing low carb high fat: he recommends UPPING the fat part and cutting back on the protein (again, this is about weight loss), but I expect it would do wonderful things for your HDL. As you know, saturated fat is NOTHING to be worried about. Try upping your coconut oil intake. I love dipping my occasional snack of a spoonful of peanut butter into the stuff. Mmmmm!!!! I fry my eggs and fish in it; I pour 2T of it in my (very low-carb, very low-sugar) whey protein shakes into which I also put a bit of heavy cream, water, and peanut butter and blend in my $20 Hamilton “personal blender.”

      Good HDL is about avoiding the carbs (including beer by the way!!!) and getting lots of the GOOD fats. The BAD fats/oils to be avoided are ANY vegetable oil (see Dr. Eades blog from January 2010 entitled “Saturated fat and heart disease: studies old and new” at this link
      http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/cardiovascular-disease/saturated-fat-and-heart-disease-studies-old-and-new/
      or just type “saturated fat” in the Search box and keep going in the results till you get to it). You will NOT eat vegetable oil after reading it. Our bodies WILL TAKE IN vegetable oil, but it hardens our arteries. Olive oil and peanut oil, not so bad – but coconut oil is the best.

  186. Anonymous says:

    Gary is a science writer, not a dietician. Check out the Atkins website for answers to questions of cholesterol rising (not uncommon in the first 3 months of low-carbing) and how to get enough potassium (green vegetables are a good source, and supplements are also available). As I recall, an avocado has more potassium than a banana.

  187. Amy Younkins says:

    Dr. Taubes,
    I eat a low carb diet, but I don’t know what to feed my toddler.  Should it be meat, eggs, cheeses, some veggies and nuts for him as well?  Also, when I am pregnant, it is difficult to sustain this eating (the nausea!)- does anyone have helpful links/suggestions?  Thanks!

    • Paula says:

      Hi Amy,See my post (a few posts below) which has posts from the famous “Hyperlipid” (GT thanks him at the end of WWGF) on what he feeds his child; click into the links so you don’t miss the comments from others to his post(s) — comments on what others feed their young ones, and the young ones’ reactions, are great!  But first:

      “Hmmm…having fed my infant raw cow’s milk and egg yolks from 3 months on, followed by grassfed pureed meats (cooked, sorry to the raw paleo crowd), I can tell you that humans are little carnivores! Meat and green veggies swimming in raw pastured butter is dinner most nights now. He’s 4 and has only had one cold so far, no dental caries. Seems to be working for us!”

  188. E Velyn says:

    I’ve been somewhat critical of you in the past, Gary, but I’m here to admit that I’ve really been a fangirl at heart all along. :) I might still disagree with you on particular conclusions you reach, but your ability to synthesize so many disparate strands of research – and present it all in layman’s terms – is truly genius. There’s much we can all learn from you – we just need to put our own pride and (perhaps even) jealousy in time-out…LOL. So take that for what it’s worth…and rock on!

  189. E Velyn says:

    Oh, forgot to add, Gary – you bring some much needed ‘carbsanity’ to this whole debate. About time!

  190. Anonymous says:

    Hi Gary,

    I wanted to quickly share my trials and tribulations after reading your book. It was a life-saving, eye opening experience for me! After years of trying to lose weight and getting nothing but fatter (and sicker, high BP, higher than normal glucose level) from an almost vegan lifestyle, I happened upon a reader’s digest arctic.e (tucked among the candy in the check out isle).
    Seven months later, and several Fine tunings, I have managed to drop my weight by 14 pounds, my blood pressure by twenty points and my glucose level by 80 points!
    I want to point out that originally I thought I fell into that minuscule part of population that it was to late for. Then after happening upon an article from an English doctor’s blog, I adjusted my fat to protein ratio to 70% of my protein. That was the turning point.
    Now every time I see jnews reports about how to lose weight with a balanced diet I cringe with disgust on how wrong they are. Even Jack Lalane had it wrong.
    T
    A Thousand Thank-Yous!!!!!!!!

  191.  It’s amazing how many people eat high cholesterol diets, exercise and assume that their blood cholesterol will fall on its own. This is not always the case, its always good to watch what people eat as different bodies respond differently to meals. You might get away but on the other hand, someone might not.

    I’m a researcher into cholesterol, please find me at http://tipsforlowercholesterol.com/how-lower-cholesterol.html

    • Paula says:

      Wow do you ever have it WRONG.  The url you posted contains all the totally WRONG “common wisdom.”  It’s all a humongous outdated cliche.  It says in part : “Cholesterol comes in two groups, the  LDL which is the bad cholesterol [NO LONGER SO-CONSIDERED:  SEE P. 172 IN GOOD CALORIES BAD CALORIES] and HDL the good cholesterol [THIS IS TRUE.]. Fats are divided into two groups, the saturated and the unsaturated. Saturated fats contain the bad cholesterol [ ! ! !  NOT TRUE!!!  SATURATED FAT IS GOOD!  CONTRARY TO COMMON WISDOM] which builds up plaques in the arterial walls [AGAIN NOT TRUE - IT'S THE SUGAR & CARBS WHICH ARE THE BASIS FOR PLAQUES - if you eat sugar & carbs you get VLDL - the BAD TYPE OF LDL - and VLDL ravages your arterial walls which cholesterol then comes to patch]. 

      You obviously have ZILCH knowledge of Taubes’ enterprise and works relating to diet.

      If you’re a “researcher into cholesterol,” for crimenellies’ sake, read Taubes “GCBC” cover to cover.

      Please.

  192. Anonymous says:

    Hi Gary, I listened to your radio show on Peoples Pharmacy and immediately bought the ebook, Why WeGet Fat.  I am 63 and pretty sure I’m insulin resistant; I’ve tried the HCG 500 calorie diet and lost about 14 lbs, have regained 7.  Of course it’s not one you can maintain for long … sorry I even tried it.  I do have most of my HCG drops left and wondering if it would be okay to take them along with following a strict low carb diet?  Thank you for reminding me of why we’re fat and what to do about it!!!

  193. Zapped says:

    In late May, I wrote here that I was a 50-year-old male from Austin, TX who had been following the Duke Diet outlined in the appendix of Gary Taubes’ “Why We Get Fat” for a few weeks. I should add that I started at 197 lbs on Apr 8 2011 and was then at 182 lbs around May 25 2011 – about 7 weeks into the change in nutrition. Last Friday I dipped below 170lbs for the first time since I was just out of college.That’s 27 lbs lost in 17 weeks. This morning there are 168.6 lbs hanging on my 5’11” frame. Never before in my life have I felt so satisfied by eating large meals of meat, green salad, and non-starchy vegetables – and both my wife & I seem to be losing weight effortlessly (she’s down 20lbs in the same period). We’re now both about center of the “normal” range based on BMI, and for me the weight continues to melt off at just under 1lb/week.Even though the change in nutrition is almost effortless and very rewarding, I do find two things that help me a lot personally. The first is a low-carb bread that has 4g carbs of which 3g are fiber – so it’s 1g net (effective) carb count. I will allow myself two pieces of toast (buttered) about every other day. The second “helper” is 1/2 cup of mixed berries when I need something sweet – blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries. Carbs are there but hopefully, as Dr. Lustig says, the poison (fructose) is packaged with the antidote (fiber).In my earlier post I wrote:> For context, my previous physicals were> Mar 2009 – total=173, HDL=41, LDL= 76, trig=281> Apr 2010 – total=155, HDL=44, LDL= 73, trig=192> My new numbers (drawn May 25 2011) were > total cholesterol=162 HDL=56, LDL=88, triglycerides=88At my annual physical on July 14 2011, these were my new numbers:total choleserol=169, HDL=58, LDL=91, trig=91Glucose, iron, liver enzymes, everything else in normal range. Statistically,  this diet is not killing me – I’m thriving!When I started this way of eating I thought I’d use it to drop a few pounds before returning to *moderate* carb consumption. After experiencing these great levels of satiety, increased energy, better sleep, lack of hunger pangs, and complete absence of low-blood-sugar droopiness in the afternoons, I can’t see bring carbs back into my diet in the future in any significant quantity.Yes, I’ll enjoy a forkful or two of cake on my birthday. Yes, I’ll have spoon or two of stuffing at Thanksgiving. Yes, I’ll dip a small hunk of crusty bread into the rosemary-and-wine broth left behind from a heaping plate of steamed mussels. These are all in the future, maybe after my weight has settled during the remained of 2011. But no more breakfast cereal, no more toast, no more sandwiches, no more chips or any other regular source of carbs. Never again for this slightly-insulin-resistant middle aged man who feels like a kid again.

    • Hi Zapped. I am a 51, 5″11″  yr old male that just had a physical and blood work done, March 1 2011, and 207 lbs. 8/29/11, 179 lbs with the same feelings as you! TCL-164 HDL- 57 LDL 96 and Tri- 96. Read about Taubes in Reader’s Digest then read the book, and changed my life. Only problem is that I run off at the mouth about it sometimes when people ask me what I did. Amazing!

    • Anonymous says:

      Hey Zapped. I’ve read Gary’s book a coupla times. Soooo eager to try the change. Tell me something…how expansive of a meal plan do you have? Plus, I LOVE lifiting weights hard (have for years) is this diet something you can maintain whilst kicking the $hit out of yourself in the gym? I do indeed like getting “bigger” with muscle!!

    • M. J. says:

      What is the name of the bread you found with only 4 carbs and where did you find it?  The best I can find is a bread with 5 grams of net carbs.

  194. Chris says:

    Stephen Guyenet deserves a PUBLIC apology from you, Gary.

  195. Amit Mehta says:

    Very impression blood numbers. Love to see the plant-based diet gurus share their blood numbers. Funny you NEVER seen that!  

    Great presentation at AHS btw. What’s your response to Stephen Guyenet who claims to have refuted your work (at least related to obesity) in a recent blog post?

    • Paula says:

      Actually, oddly enough, in this blog, there is this doctor who had this exchange with gt:

      frankjspencejr
      Gary, this is spooky. As you know I have also been on the 3 eggs a day, high fat, very low carb diet about 2 years. Just yesterday I had my lipids checked, with almost identical results as yours:T Chol 192, TG 65, LDL-C 114, HDL-C 65.3, VLDL 13, Chol/HDL 2.9Weight staying mid 180s. Thanks again for your good work.

      garytaubes
      Hi Frank,Spooky it is, since you don’t eat any meat at all and I live on it. Nice numbers and nice to hear from you,
      as ever.
      gt

  196. Anonymous says:

    In your books you claim that hunter gatherers ate a diet high in saturated fat and therefore modern humans are adapted to do the same. But HGs ate wild game, not supermarket meat. If you look up wild elk, moose or whale meat in the USDA National Nutrient Database, you will find that their palmitic acid content (represented as 16:0 under saturated fat in the database) is so low they could be part of an Ornish diet. Even though they ate the whole carcass, their total palimitic acid consumption is only 1/2 that of Americans according to Professor Loren Cordain who collected the evidence. In fact whale meat contains about 1/75 the amount found in a comparable portion of T-bone from a feedlot steer.

    In metabolic ward studies when Americans eat a high saturated fat diet, ON AVERAGE their serum cholesterol goes up a lot. The Masai seem to contradict this, but 82% of their food additives contain cholesterol lowering saponins or phenolics. If their food wasn’t full of statin-like chemicals their serum cholesterol would be high instead of low.

    For an American your lipid profile looks okay, but HGs including the Inuit average between 100 and 150 total cholesterol. In order to immulate the HGs it seems necessary to reduce saturated fat as well as sugar. 

  197. Anonymous says:

    In your books you claim that hunter gatherers ate a diet high in saturated fat and therefore modern humans are adapted to do the same. But HGs ate wild game, not supermarket meat. If you look up wild elk, moose or whale meat in the USDA National Nutrient Database, you will find that their palmitic acid content (represented as 16:0 under saturated fat in the database) is so low they could be part of an Ornish diet. Even though they ate the whole carcass, their total palimitic acid consumption is only 1/2 that of Americans according to Professor Loren Cordain who collected the evidence. In fact whale meat contains about 1/75 the amount found in a comparable portion of T-bone from a feedlot steer.

    In metabolic ward studies when Americans eat a high saturated fat diet, ON AVERAGE their serum cholesterol goes up a lot. The Masai seem to contradict this, but 82% of their food additives contain cholesterol lowering saponins or phenolics. If their food wasn’t full of statin-like chemicals their serum cholesterol would be high instead of low.

    For an American your lipid profile looks okay, but HGs including the Inuit average between 100 and 150 total cholesterol. In order to immulate the HGs it seems necessary to reduce saturated fat as well as sugar. 

  198. Anonymous says:

    The Women’s Health Initiative is often cited as evidence that a low saturated fat diet does not reduce heart attacks. But it also tells us that increasing whatever they ate instead of animal fat, most likely sugar and white flour, didn’t increase heart attacks either. I think the most reasonable interpretation of that study is that animal fat as well as sugar and white flour increase heart attacks but they cancelled each other out.

    In John Yudkin’s experiments both animal fat and sugar raised serum cholesterol and the combination raised it more than either one alone.

  199. Anonymous says:

    A diet experiment like the WHI that reduces animal fat isn’t much better than an uncontrolled observational study if it doesn’t tell people what to eat more of when they reduce animal fat. Replacing it with stick margarine should increase heart attacks. Replacing it with sugar and white flour (which is just as bad) shouldn’t make any difference. Replacing it with canola oil based margarine should reduce heart attacks like it did in the Lyon Diet-Heart Study. Replacing it with fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains should also reduce heart attacks like it did for the rural Chinese during the 80′s and like it did for Dr. Ornish and Dr. Esselstyn’s clinical trials.Everybody can’t eat low fat and everybody can’t eat low carb, but low fat, low carb and Mediterranean diets can all reduce heart attacks if they also reduce animal fat, sugar and white flour. This is what the modern hunter gatherers, Mediterranean diet of Crete during the 50′s and the rural Chinese during the 80′s, the Okinawa centenarians have in common.The French and other groups manage a moderately low rate of heart disease while eating a lot of animal fat, but they do other things to compensate for it. Like drinking wine with meals which raises HDL and eating more fruits and vegetables and probably other things as well. The bottom line is that none of the groups with a low rate of heart disease are eating a traditional Atkins diet, which works deceptively well for weight loss and blood sugar control in people with the metabolic syndrome, but which doesn’t reduce the risk of heart disease in any study that measures mortality.

  200. Anonymous says:

    A diet experiment like the WHI that reduces animal fat isn’t much better than an uncontrolled observational study if it doesn’t tell people what to eat more of when they reduce animal fat. Replacing it with stick margarine should increase heart attacks. Replacing it with sugar and white flour (which is just as bad) shouldn’t make any difference. Replacing it with canola oil based margarine should reduce heart attacks like it did in the Lyon Diet-Heart Study. Replacing it with fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains should also reduce heart attacks like it did for the rural Chinese during the 80′s and like it did for Dr. Ornish and Dr. Esselstyn’s clinical trials.Everybody can’t eat low fat and everybody can’t eat low carb, but low fat, low carb and Mediterranean diets can all reduce heart attacks if they also reduce animal fat, sugar and white flour. This is what the hunter gatherers, Mediterranean diet of Crete during the 50′s and the rural Chinese during the 80′s, the Okinawa centenarians have in common.The French and other groups manage a moderately low rate of heart disease while eating a lot of animal fat, but they do other things to compensate for it. Like drinking wine with meals which raises HDL and eating lots of fruits and vegetables which probably lowers oxidation of LDL. The bottom line is that none of the groups with a low rate of heart disease are eating a traditional Atkins diet, which works deceptively well for weight loss and blood sugar control in people with the metabolic syndrome, but which doesn’t reduce the risk of heart disease in any study that measures mortality.

  201. Anonymous says:

    post

  202. Anonymous says:

    Hello,
    I have just stumbled into your world!! I mostly agree w a high protein diet, good fat (only whole milk, yogurt etc), good grains, vegs and fruits for myself and my family (two boys). I don’t care for hot dogs or bacon or sausage on a regular basis. For our protein I preferred organic, clean meat (non of the antibiotics etc) and we love eggs!!!  Of course, i tried to keep us from junk food as much as possible….my husband can be hardheaded sometimes but we do love rice and bread. My children do not watch TV at all and generally live an active lives. Sugars have been difficult to avoid….of course no sodas ever, hardly any juices if they have apple juice it is always water down, but ice cream, Popsicles, cookies (organic) and the occasional lollipop are difficult to avoid for us!! 
    I’m getting to a point, as tedious as this unsolicited information can be, both of my boys were exclusively breastfed for the first six months of their lives and were nursed til over the age of two. The youngest one is still currently nursed. My  first brother and I were both nursed for the first year of my our lives, my youngest brother who was born in this country was unfortunately nursed and bottle fed formula from birth ( he is currently overweight).
    I just wonder with all the data that you have seen that pertain to obesity in this country….has breastfeeding, breastfeeding exclusively for the first six months and the over all length of nursing been used as a determining variable in the causation of obesity and the rise obesity in this country. The decrease/decline of nursing in the states started pretty early on so that formula fed first generations probably did not nurse at all their young? Formula is known to be terrible in comparison to breastmilk. Countries that normally would not have such obesity problems now do along with other issues and this comes w the decrease in breastfeeding  and preference to formula since this is pus pro pushed by the Formula companies as the best thing for babies or just as good as breastmilk!!  I just wonder how come such crucial factor as nursing/breastmilk are not really held as a basic factor for a healthy diet to start your life with? It seems to me that once you laid this foundation the chances for good health, weight are better with a diet that resembles our natural state….meaning high protein, high fat low carbs (unless geographically/environmentally you have lived w a high carb diet and thrived a la Jared Diamond).
    It just seems to me that there is not enough mentioned in these talks about the genesis of nutrition and not enough emphasis on it….yes i realize that there are a lot of people currently obese but good  science should be looking at what these people were fed as newborns!! And what generations of newborns are being fed or will be fed.
    I did see that u mentioned in passing that u didn’t know how much sugar was in formulas or what was in formulas but that seems to be a big omission since this first and original nutritional foundation can possibly lay out very different paths for people who are genetically predisposed to obesity and otherwise. Further, pregnant women’s diets should be examined and considered on how they impact their newborns and if they  impact their babies health. Moreover, i wonder if they expectant mothers who were nursed differed from expectant mothers that were not nursed. I remember reading somewhere that if my mother would have smoked in her lifetime that could have affected not just me but my unborn children.
    Of course, I suspect you have been formula fed ;)
    Apologies in advance, if you have already cover this since I just could not go through all your post and research is not my forte!
    Best,Jessica 

  203. Will somebody kindly tell me please, how we can hold an intelligent discussion between kindergardeners and PHD’s. — That’s what Gary is facing.

  204. Will somebody kindly tell me please, how we can hold an intelligent discussion between kindergardeners and PHD’s. — That’s what Gary is facing.

  205. Plainsboro House says:

    I read the Gary Taube’s book which open my eyes and since May I am trying to follow the rules to lose my weight. I did pretty good job for 3 months (starting from May) and I lost most of my post pregnancy weight but I would like still to lose more.
    But now it’s really hard for me to resist all the temptations give up all the carbs, from time to time I crave sweets.

    Last weekend I read the article in New York Times magazine about willpower and how it weakens because of making different decisions. The whole article is interesting, but there is one paragraph about glucose and willpower:

    Here is the excerpt:
    >The discoveries about glucose help explain why dieting is a uniquely difficult test of self-control — and why even people with phenomenally strong willpower in the rest of their lives can have such a hard time losing weight.
    They start out the day with virtuous intentions, resisting croissants at breakfast and dessert at lunch, but each act of resistance further lowers their willpower.
     As their willpower weakens late in the day, they need to replenish it. But to resupply that energy, they need to give the body glucose.
     They’re trapped in a nutritional catch-22:
    1. In order not to eat, a dieter needs willpower.
    2. In order to have willpower, a dieter needs to eat. <

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/21/magazine/do-you-suffer-from-decision-fatigue.html

  206. Anonymous says:

    Gary,

    A few things.

    I have been reading about how they are breeding wheat to have more gluten, and some are linking that to increased obesity and diabetes.  Your thoughts.

    Another issue is whether doctors measure the most important items for people who are at risk for diabetes/obesity/heart disease.  Do you agree that HDL, LDL fractions, Triglycerides, CRP are the most important items?  Are you willing to go out on a limb and suggest it in an article?

    Thirdly, I was looking at Fox News health site, where they expound the old calories in, calories out, and the requirement of 5 hours exercise per week and more for the obese!!!!  Such bad advice.  People can’t/won’t follow it.  It’s the shame game etc.  You are slothful, weak, etc.

    Just food for thought, ha ha.

    • Paula says:

      Hi Shawn – Sorry, I know your comments and questions are addressed to Gary – he seems to be busy writing his sugar/HFCS book which is expected to come out around Oct 2012 if all goes well.  Gary, are you out there?!? 

      In the meantime… Wheat is a big topic nowadays.  Here’s William Davis on it:

      http://www.wheatbellyblog.com/2011/07/wheat-belly-frequently-asked-questions/

      Just a couple days ago I was excited to come across William Davis, M.D., whom I think of now as “MR. WHEAT” – or make that “DR. WHEAT” :  The site says, “William Davis, MD, is a preventive cardiologist whose unique approach to diet allows him to advocate reversal, not just prevention, of heart disease.” 

      He’s written a book against wheat called “Wheat Belly.”  He also knows a lot about what they’re doing to wheat nowadays, similar to what they’re doing to alfalfa, soy, and God knows what else.

      http://www.wheatbellyblog.com/2011/07/herbicide-resistant-wheat/#comment-122This is exactly the GMO stuff that, when they did it to the potato in Europe not that long ago (England to be specific) and tried to foist it on people there and in continental Europe (I’m talking about foisting GMOs on the populace), Arpad Pusztai was hired to test these potatoes and didn’t like what he saw in his dear ratties.  They tried to shut him up (there was an actual gag order and they smeared his reputation – big money involved regarding these GMO potatoes) but FINALLY the gag order was lifted because he was called to testify to Parliament 9 months later or something.  If my understanding is correct, his testimony (slides of rat tummy cell growth after eating GMO potatoes, etc.)  is why GMOs didn’t make it in Europe.

      Here, in the USA, GMOs aren’t even labeled.  You can see snippets of this political fight filmed in “Food, Inc.” (the documentary).  Food, Inc. is a must see.   It will blow your ever-livin’ mind.  “Food libel laws.”  Elsewhere — on YouTube somewhere — Jerry Brunetti jokes about ending up in jail for ”dissing” Florida tomatoes; after watching Food, Inc., one knows he wasn’t kidding (these food libel laws initially ‘sprouted’ after the false “Alar” scare regarding apples cost a number of growers their livelihoods; so dissing food got exempted from First-Amendment-protected speech rights, just as free-speech rights don’t include yelling “Fire!” for fun in a crowded theatre…)

      As for doctors measuring all those things that count – most doctors don’t know their arse from a hole in the ground.  (Am watching Tom Naughton’s “Science for Smart People” on YouTube which explains how this can happen.) 

      But Chris Kresser’s blog shows how, at the end of this video, one can send one’s blood to the labs he mentions to get one of 3 tests he explains, including the VAP test whose results Gary displays at this blog post.  SO!  re VAP tests, etc. go to http://www.thehealthyskeptic.org Special Reports>Heart Disease/Cholesterol>Healthy Skeptic Videos>I Have High Cholesterol and I Don’t Care

    • Pattye says:

      Hi Shawn, Read the new book “Wheat Belly” an excellent companion to Gary’s books. I learned so much from this book too, but also cemented the realization that I have acquired either full blown non-intestinal symptom Celiac’s Disease or at least full blown gluten sensitivity. It is truly frightening all the things that the present day hybridized wheat can cause, particularly given the fact that the current 42 chromosomes in present day wheat has some new gluten proteins present that weren’t 20 years ago.

  207. Anonymous says:

    You’re obviously a very smart person and you talk elequently about how important it is to do good science. You also tell us how easy it is for very smart people to be misled by observational studies. Yet your arguments promoting saturated fat as heart healthy are based mainly on observational studies of other cultures and anecdotal evidence. The idea that hunter gatherers ate a diet high in saturated fat (especially palmitic acid) is objectively false. Any one can verify this by looking up various wild game in the USDA National Nutrient Database. The HGs serum cholesterol range of 100 to 150 and their near-absence of heart disease is impossible to duplicate in a large group of average people eating a high animal fat diet.

  208. Paula says:

    Wow, this guy REALLY hates wheat!

    http://www.wheatbellyblog.com/

  209. Charles says:

    I think the premiss of the debate is about which eating habits will help people lose weight long term keep it off and be healthy. The determining factor for me is which diet would I tell my kids is better for them long term one high in saturated fats and animal based products or one with low saturated fats and high in plant based products. 

  210. Anonymous says:

    Hi Gary,

    First please allow me to laud your work — I don’t think many, even including most who have read your books, appreciate the depth and breadth of your research and understanding of the subject you cover. The lack of this breadth, I think, is what in most tends to lead to wrong-headed conclusions …. a convenient selection of that evidence (from the vast body) which fits the desired hypothesis.

    I recently visited East Africa and had the privilege of staying with a Masai society in their village, eating their diet of blood and milk and occasional meat. The young leader (a very bright guy) of the group of less than a hundred people or so was very interested in the subject you have researched, specifically with regard to the possible negative affect of adopting even a partial diet of starches and refined carbohydrates. Most of the Masai now supplement their traditional living with income from tourism, and of course they are tempted to purchase modern foods to supplement their traditional diet. Anyway, I thought you might appreciate this anecdote.

    I sent this young leader both of your books, in addition to some older works of people such as Weston Price.

    I was struck by the unique physical build and musculature of the Masai who still maintain the traditional diet, and I believe that it is the result primarily of the raw milk from which they derive the vast majority of their macronutrients.

    I, like almost everyone else who comes to be interested in the evolutionary model of human diet and health, have my own chronic health issues. I am about your own age, and I have responded very well to a low-carb diet. This has stabilized my body composition at a fat percentage of ~10% or so.

    Interestingly, although my HDL and Tg’s cleaned up nicely, my LDL-c went way up from the high hundreds to the mid to high 200s (mg/dL). Hence, I am considered hypercholesterolemic. I also discovered that I have isolated fasting hyperglycemia which puts me roughly on the lower edge of what is now considered pre-diabetic. My insulin sensitivity is sky high — in the region of highly trained athletes (I have been doing serious weight lifting, and this is probably partly responsible). My blood pressure is ~95/60 mm-Hg fairly consistently, and occasionally a bit lower.

    Overall, I think I’d have to be considered pretty healthy (even by my PCP, who tried to put me on a statin). But I am concerned about the i-IFG — I have read the very limited research on this intensively. Ralph DeFronzo and his colleagues have generated much of the most interesting research. They have produced evidence that fasting hyperglycemia is caused by an age-related decrease in the non-insulin-dependent (i.e. mass-action) pathway for skeletal muscle glucose uptake. Some of my own personal experimentation is consistent with this — I have found supplements that have at least a temporary corrective effect upon my blood sugar regulation.

    Isolated IFG is characterized by an early dropoff in insulin secretion and normal whole-body (i.e. skeletal-muscle) insulin sensitivity. It appears to be a very different pathology from that of IGT — this is the one that most people seem to think characterizes all pre-diabetes, and unlike IFG it includes a phase of hyperinsulinemia before the following decline leading to onset of diabetes. IFG doesn’t respond much to diet, exercise and drugs (if at all), and hence almost all of the drug studies not only focus on IGT but usually exclude i-IFG subjects, I have noticed. It appears to be fundamentally related to aging-associated changes in genetic expression in the tissues, and has nothing to do with insulin resistance.

    I’d like to suggest pre-diabetes, and maybe even “impaired fasting glucose” specifically, as a potential topic for you in future. But I realize that the state of the research is still pretty immature, and maybe too much so to be appropriate.

    I made the effort to read your Science article entitled “Prosperity’s Plague”, and recognized almost all of the researchers that you quoted therein from my own reading of the literature. I’d love to see something like this article on the possible etiology of obesity and insulin resistance, but instead more focused on the pathology of blood-sugar disregulation.

    Here’s how I think it ties in with the body of work you have already produced — it seems to me that there must be something in the modern diet that produces hyperglycemia and T2DM, simply because T2DM appears to have been rare just a few centuries ago. While my own condition seems to have a strong genetic component of etiology, I believe it must also have an accompanying dietary component. Maybe fructose, for instance — I know you are currently working on this. I myself have never consistently eaten much sugar of any kind, but I didn’t avoid it until recently. I have always found HFCS distasteful in fact — much too saccharine. Now I meticulously avoid all sugar in my diet.

    I will continue to follow your work with much interest, and I hope for our society’s sake that you are successful. Count me a fan.

    Best regards,
    Ken MacKillop

  211. Paula says:

    Ken, you mention “isolated fasting hyperglycemia…”   I have something similar and came across this (not sure it’s precisely what you’re writing about) on Hyperlipid’s blog, regarding the phenomena among low carbers:

    http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2007/10/physiological-insulin-resistance.html

  212. Paula says:

    If you want to see what an LDL particle looks like, check this out (I found it in a post by Hyperlipid):

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK9831/figure/A2023/

    You can see why having one’s ApoB level checked tells you a lot…

  213. Paula says:

    http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/10/12/the-big-fat-lie.aspx

    “Host Angelo Coppola talks with best-selling author Gary Taubes (Good Calories, Bad Calories & Why We Get Fat). They discuss Gary’s early work, science, carbs, exercise, the Ancestral Health Symposium, and much more”

  214. I was really hoping that my latest lab results would be similar to GT’s above…after being on a HFLC diet since April I would have expected my HDL to have risen much more, and my LDL to have stayed the same or increased just slightly. 
    2010              Currently
    HDL-47           52
    LDL-137          193!!!
    Trig-120           95

    Gary, or anyone out there, can you please explain the drastic rise in LDL?  Let’s hope it’s the FLUFFY type!!!  Thank you!!!!!

    • Brooke777 says:

      Correction: 2010′s HDL was only 37; 2010′s tri was 130

      • anonymous says:

        I had a similar experience to Brooke’s after being on this diet for six months (beginning April 2011). My numbers:

        Feb 2011:
        Trig: 134
        LDL: 113
        HDL: 47

        Oct 2011:
        Trig: 210
        LDL: 264
        HDL: 46

        Difficult to explain, indeed.

  215. anon says:

    Sure many people should eat low/lower carbs much of the time, but even that isn’t the big picture. I have a blood type A friend with chronic acid reflux from eating meat. Should he reduce his carbs or cycle them? Sure. Eating red meat hasn’t helped him, nor do I believe eating a high protein will help him either. The blood type theory is flawed for sure but it’s a step in the right direction for most. I’m a blood type O genotyoed as a Hunter in D’Adamo’s system; I absolutely thrive on the high protein meat diet and have 15 years experience as a meat free vegan. I was fat and lethargic as a vegan and also developed binge eating disorder, something that magically went away the day I started eating animal foods again. I never have acid reflux or any kind of digestive disturbances and seem to have become more like the classic O personality type described in the D’Adamo books: much more conscientious and rule driven, no nonsense, practical etc. D’Adamo also uses Myers Briggs test to support the theory. As a vegan I was much more touchy-feely sensitive new age hippie out of it– the way I’ve noticed many As are naturally irrespective of diet—while 6 years on a meat diet has definitely toughened me up and made me a more positive personality.

  216. kg says:

    I have been eating the picture-perfect “healthy” diet the government recommends since I was 18… no fat, all whole grains, tons of carbs, little protein… and all I always struggled with my weight! In college, I did 2-2 1/2 hours of intense exercise (swimming, running, trampoline, jogging the bleachers, eliptical machine, strength training, tried it all…) every day, eating this way… and it didn’t help me lose pound! Considering the “healthy” way never worked for me… I’m willing to give this a try!

  217. Marion says:

    Hi Gary, great blood results! I have had amalgams removed at my biological dentist at Margate in Queensland, Australia and follow your diet on their advice to help with removal of mercury and lose some weight. I have lost weight and feel pretty good but I really struggle with meat at breakfast. My husband loves it but I have come to hate sitting down at the breakfast table. Does anyone have any suggestions so I can have protein and fat at breakfast?

  218. Charlie says:

    I have embraced (Last 5 months) the primal/paleo conceot of eating. Recently I had my cholesterol tested and my total cholesterol is up to 265. My HDL’s are at 75. TC is up from 220 before I started the primal/paleo concept. Does any one have any ideas on this or similar experience?

    • Warren Dew says:

      Low carb will generally increase HDL and decrease triglycerides, but doesn’t seem to have any reliable effect on LDL. Of course, since triglycerides divided by HDL is the strongest indicator of heart attack risk, that’s still good.

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  220. Michael says:

    Hi Gary,

    A couple of years ago you wrote an article about how a friend in whose home you were a guest took offense to the fact that you only wanted to eat steak, and skip the carb side dishes, and (IIRC) expressed some sympathy for how vegetarians must go through the same thing; it was a reflection on people’s intolerance for other folks’ dietary choices. I’ve been Googling around and can’t find it; could you direct me to a copy, or maybe post it here if it’s disappeared into digital Never-Never Land?

    Thanks!

  221. Magarietha Zondagh says:

    No doubt, Dr. Oz WILL find something in here that bothers him. Also isn’t it a fact that Dr. Oz is of Turkish extraction and could it be that they might be very carbohydrate tolerant since it’s such a high grain consuming country? Isn’t that why the Chinese and Japanese are relatively thin and healthy when really among the poor they eat probably 90% rice and are OKAY with it? Sorry might be talking out of turn, still have to purchase this book. Just read somewhere that some nations (races?) are carbo-tolerant and others not, hence their great prolification of diabetes type II. I notice all the letters are 2011 so yet again I’m slow on the button here. Cheers everybody. You’ve got to Love this diet.

  222. adamas says:

    Lol. 204 total cholesterol.
    According the dumb medical establishment Taubes openly dismisses, his cholesterol is “perfect”.
    According to say, the landmark Framingham heart study, the gold standard on heart disease? it’s 54 points too high, at the least. You are at risk for heart disease Taubes; take care of your heart!
    But 3 cheers for good genetics: my own cholesterol was around 154 on a standard american diet of processed crap (soda chips, fries, you name it)… I switched to a mostly plant based diet, and my cholesterol is now 120 (I lost 50 pounds too). I see nothing here that proves anything much: we’d need to see his cholesterol over time. My friend who had a cholesterol of 400 who went to 100% plant based now has a cholesterol under 70… Total. That’s the kind of change that impresses me in a diet.
    I would advise those of you on this diet to check your personal cholesterol numbers, Your genetics might not be good enough to keep your cholesterol down despite your diet.

    • Tomasz T says:

      You are writing this on Taubes’ blog. Have you actually read what he has to say on Framingham? Hint: it’s in his book, “Good Calories, Bad Calories”. Why don’t you check it out, then see if you have a cogent criticism to offer.

    • marylouise says:

      I am sure you meant well, but take care because if your numbers drop too low you will not have a brain cell left in your head.

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  224. marylouise says:

    March 2011 I started low carbin. Today I have lost over 120 pounds. I saw the Dr. Oz show when you were on it. He was very rude to you and sadly after some reading and many pounds later I found the Atkins web site. I could not lose weight on that new diet. I started on Atkins 72 with Dr. Atkins food list I found from the 60s. Over a year later and much lighter I am finally free from layers of lard caused by years of eating bad carbs! I have had my lipids checked and with a starting number of over 400 I am happy to say I have cut that in half. I don’t have my report yet but when I do I will post them.
    I am on a forum that eats low carb.
    Keep up the wonderful enlightenment to help people discover the truth about good carbs/bad carbs.
    I feel like I am alive today because of Dr. Atkins and I look for forward to this WOE for the rest of my life!

  225. Fraser says:

    Just more Evidence to support this diet! Thx Gary!

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