Catching up on lost time – the Ancestral Health Symposium, food reward, palatability, insulin signaling and carbohydrates… Part II(e, as in “end” and “enough already”)

  In our last post, we discussed, among other things, an experiment from the 1960s that Dr. Stephan Guyenet of wholehealthsource.org has evoked to support the food reward/palatability hypothesis of obesity. This was an experiment by Sami Hashim and Ted Van Itallie published in 1965. Four subjects, two lean and two obese, consumed a formula … [Read more]

Catching up on lost time – the Ancestral Health Symposium, food reward, palatability, insulin signaling and carbohydrates… Part II(d)

  When last I left off, the subject of discussion was the critical question about the food reward/palatability hypothesis of obesity: Can palatability and reward value of foods be disassociated from the metabolic and hormonal effects of the individual nutrients being consumed and, in particular, the sugar and refined grains that “hyper-rewarding” foods seem to … [Read more]

Catching up on lost time – the Ancestral Health Symposium, food reward, palatability, insulin signaling and carbohydrates… Part II(c)

  We’ve been discussing the food reward/palatability hypothesis of obesity and whether this idea adds anything meaningful to our understanding of obesity.  Is the evidence for it sufficiently compelling that we should cease to pay attention to the fact that insulin, as Yalow and Berson noted in 1965, is “the principal regulator of fat metabolism?” … [Read more]

Catching up on lost time – the Ancestral Health Symposium, food reward, palatability, insulin signaling and carbohydrates… Part II(b)

When last we left off, the subject was the food reward/palatability hypothesis of obesity and why I find it so unconvincing and problematic. This post is going to address that issue by first discussing three new papers published on the subject of sugar.  Then I’m going to ask a lot of questions, hoping at least … [Read more]

Catching up on lost time – the Ancestral Health Symposium, food reward, palatability, insulin signaling and carbohydrates… Part II(a)

  When last I posted, oh so long ago, I promised next to discuss the food reward/palatability hypothesis of obesity and why I find it so uncompelling and more than a little bit disheartening.  Why, in effect, I think it is the kind of bad science that begs to be challenged, as I did, when it … [Read more]