What would happen if…? Thoughts (and thought experiments) on the calorie issue

Thought experiments are devices of the imagination used to investigate the nature of things…. The primary philosophical challenge of thought experiments is simple: How can we learn about reality (if we can at all), just by thinking? More precisely, are there thought experiments that enable us to acquire new knowledge about the intended realm of investigation … [Read more]

Metabolism, Diet, and Disease Conference update and a job posting

  I promised in my last post — yes, far too long ago — that I would give an update on the Metabolism, Diet and Disease Conference, which was held at the end of May in Washington, DC. As the months passed, I was waiting to hear from the organizers that they had posted a … [Read more]

Science, Pseudoscience, Nutritional Epidemiology, and Meat

  I’m writing this post with a little more haste than is my wont. I’ve received dozens of e-mails asking me to comment on the recent news — ala the the New York Times — that meat-eating apparently causes premature death and disease. So this post is likely to contain more than my usual number of typos, egregious spelling … [Read more]

Updates for 2012

  Checking in after a long absence (working too hard, and blogging too little), I have news and updates for 2012. The first order of business is a letter to the editor of the New York Times in response to Tara Parker-Pope’s “The Fat Trap” article that ran on the cover of the January 1st  NYT Magazine. I … [Read more]

Catching up on lost time – the Ancestral Health Symposium, food reward, palatability, insulin signaling and carbohydrates… Part II(e, as in “end” and “enough already”)

  In our last post, we discussed, among other things, an experiment from the 1960s that Dr. Stephan Guyenet of wholehealthsource.org has evoked to support the food reward/palatability hypothesis of obesity. This was an experiment by Sami Hashim and Ted Van Itallie published in 1965. Four subjects, two lean and two obese, consumed a formula … [Read more]

Catching up on lost time – the Ancestral Health Symposium, food reward, palatability, insulin signaling and carbohydrates… Part II(d)

  When last I left off, the subject of discussion was the critical question about the food reward/palatability hypothesis of obesity: Can palatability and reward value of foods be disassociated from the metabolic and hormonal effects of the individual nutrients being consumed and, in particular, the sugar and refined grains that “hyper-rewarding” foods seem to … [Read more]