What would happen if…? Thoughts (and thought experiments) on the calorie issue

Thought experiments are devices of the imagination used to investigate the nature of things…. The primary philosophical challenge of thought experiments is simple: How can we learn about reality (if we can at all), just by thinking? More precisely, are there thought experiments that enable us to acquire new knowledge about the intended realm of investigation … [Read more]

Metabolism, Diet, and Disease Conference

Well, it’s  Back to the Better-Late-Than-Never… There’s an interesting conference starting Tuesday the 29th in Washington – today –and I should have written about it months ago. It’s the Metabolism, Diet and Disease conference being held at the Georgetown University Conference Center. The editors of BioMed Central, a British open-access science publishing company, are the organizers. … [Read more]

On the greatly-exaggerated demise of the insulin-hypothesis

NEJM

Last week, I tweeted a New England Journal of Medicine image challenge, part of the journal’s continuing education program for physicians. I suggested that it might be a source of comfort to those who were worried about the insulin hypothesis as a viable hypothesis to explain obesity and excess fat accumulation. Although I linked to … [Read more]

Updates for 2012

  Checking in after a long absence (working too hard, and blogging too little), I have news and updates for 2012. The first order of business is a letter to the editor of the New York Times in response to Tara Parker-Pope’s “The Fat Trap” article that ran on the cover of the January 1st  NYT Magazine. I … [Read more]

Catching up on lost time – the Ancestral Health Symposium, food reward, palatability, insulin signaling and carbohydrates… Part II(d)

  When last I left off, the subject of discussion was the critical question about the food reward/palatability hypothesis of obesity: Can palatability and reward value of foods be disassociated from the metabolic and hormonal effects of the individual nutrients being consumed and, in particular, the sugar and refined grains that “hyper-rewarding” foods seem to … [Read more]

Catching up on lost time – the Ancestral Health Symposium, food reward, palatability, insulin signaling and carbohydrates… Part II(c)

  We’ve been discussing the food reward/palatability hypothesis of obesity and whether this idea adds anything meaningful to our understanding of obesity.  Is the evidence for it sufficiently compelling that we should cease to pay attention to the fact that insulin, as Yalow and Berson noted in 1965, is “the principal regulator of fat metabolism?” … [Read more]